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THE ROARING 20'S ANTIQUE CARS ONLINE ONLY AUCTION

THE ROARING 20'S ANTIQUE CARS ONLINE ONLY AUCTION

Auction closed.
Auction closed.
THE ROARING 20'S ANTIQUE CARS ONLINE ONLY AUCTION

THE ROARING 20'S ANTIQUE CARS ONLINE ONLY AUCTION

Auction closed.
Auction closed.
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The Roaring Twenties Antique Car Museum Online Only Timed Auction.

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1925 Chandler Big Six Seven-Passenger Tourer

Lot # 503      

OHV inline six-cylinder engine, 55 HP, three-speed manual constant-mesh transmission with single reverse gear, leaf spring suspension, rear-wheel mechanical drum braking system; wheelbase: 123" The Chandler Motor Company was formed in 1913 by a group of former officers of Lozier Motors, a luxury manufacturer. After setting up shop in Cleveland, Ohio, they sought to produce a car based roughly on the Lozier Light-Six. Their product, the Chandler motorcar, was very successful and it quickly became one of the most highly regarded mid-priced automobiles in America. Though the cars were certainly not competition material, the Chandler's performance on the road earned it great merit. In 1915, a Chandler Six was driven nonstop across treacherous roads, paths, and trails from Tijuana, Mexico to Vancouver, Canada, traveling nearly 2,000 miles. Ten years later, in 1926, racecar driver Ralph Mulford drove 1,000 miles in just 689 minutes, setting yet another record in a Chandler. The brand took the Twenties by storm, with production increasing from 5,000 to 10,000 units in 1922 alone. Chandler was also the driving force behind several different innovations over the years such as the constant-mesh Traffic Transmission, introduced in 1924. The transmission's design enabled the car to climb from slow to fast speeds while remaining in high gear and not bucking upon initial acceleration. Its unique gearing assembly brought the Chandler a stunning victory at the 1925 Pike's Peak Hill Climb. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this lovely green and black 1925 Chandler Big Six Seven-Passenger Tourer. This handsome sedan is fitted with the famed "Pikes Peak Motor" smooth running inline six-cylinder, mated to the advanced constant-mesh three-speed manual transmission. This car comes with all the standard, as well as some optional, equipment including the rear end Stop signal, Motometer, cowl lights and an accessory trunk. The interior features comfortable tan velour seating, pull down window shades, a fuel gauge, amperemeter, speedometer. Chandler reached its peak production in 1927, manufacturing nearly 20,000 cars. Unfortunately, in 1928, a mere one year later, Chandler was absorbed by the Hupp Motor Car Corporation. Hupp's president Dubois Young, discontinued Chandler production upon acquiring the brand. While Chandler's manufacturing period was brief, their legacy lives on through the continued use and enjoyment of their products such as this 1925 Big Six Tourer.
OHV inline six-cylinder engine, 55 HP, three-speed manual constant-mesh transmission with single reverse gear, leaf spring suspension, rear-wheel mechanical drum braking ...moresystem; wheelbase: 123" The Chandler Motor Company was formed in 1913 by a group of former officers of Lozier Motors, a luxury manufacturer. After setting up shop in Cleveland, Ohio, they sought to produce a car based roughly on the Lozier Light-Six. Their product, the Chandler motorcar, was very successful and it quickly became one of the most highly regarded mid-priced automobiles in America. Though the cars were certainly not competition material, the Chandler's performance on the road earned it great merit. In 1915, a Chandler Six was driven nonstop across treacherous roads, paths, and trails from Tijuana, Mexico to Vancouver, Canada, traveling nearly 2,000 miles. Ten years later, in 1926, racecar driver Ralph Mulford drove 1,000 miles in just 689 minutes, setting yet another record in a Chandler. The brand took the Twenties by storm, with production increasing from 5,000 to 10,000 units in 1922 alone. Chandler was also the driving force behind several different innovations over the years such as the constant-mesh Traffic Transmission, introduced in 1924. The transmission's design enabled the car to climb from slow to fast speeds while remaining in high gear and not bucking upon initial acceleration. Its unique gearing assembly brought the Chandler a stunning victory at the 1925 Pike's Peak Hill Climb. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this lovely green and black 1925 Chandler Big Six Seven-Passenger Tourer. This handsome sedan is fitted with the famed "Pikes Peak Motor" smooth running inline six-cylinder, mated to the advanced constant-mesh three-speed manual transmission. This car comes with all the standard, as well as some optional, equipment including the rear end Stop signal, Motometer, cowl lights and an accessory trunk. The interior features comfortable tan velour seating, pull down window shades, a fuel gauge, amperemeter, speedometer. Chandler reached its peak production in 1927, manufacturing nearly 20,000 cars. Unfortunately, in 1928, a mere one year later, Chandler was absorbed by the Hupp Motor Car Corporation. Hupp's president Dubois Young, discontinued Chandler production upon acquiring the brand. While Chandler's manufacturing period was brief, their legacy lives on through the continued use and enjoyment of their products such as this 1925 Big Six Tourer.

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1931 Buick Series 50 Sedan

Lot # 501      

220 cid straight-eight engine, 77 HP, three-speed manual transmission with single reverse gear, semi-elliptic leaf springs with a semi-floating rear axle, four-wheel mechanical brakes; wheelbase: 114". One of the oldest automotive manufacturers in the United States, Buick's early success can be attributed to its development of the valve-in-head engine, known today as the overhead-valve engine. The first production Buick, the Model B, was very well-engineered even by modern standards, and was received well by the public. Headed by William "Billy" Durant who was a natural promoter, Buick moved into first place as the largest automotive manufacturer in America. It is reasonable to say that without Buick, there would not have been a General Motors, as Durant used Buick's profits to finance the corporations establishment. From then onward, Buick continued to impress consumers by taking the checkered flag at the first-ever race held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Buick introduced the Model D in 1907, which was the brands first full-size car. Buick's popularity was growing overseas as well, particularly in the Chinese Empire where it was regarded as a prestigious automobile that was driven by high-level politicians and even the Emperor. In 1914, Buick made its first six-cylinder motor and ten years later, detachable cylinder heads and four-wheel brakes were introduced. In 1925, the company abruptly opted out of producing four-cylinder motors, and all Buick's from then on used sixes. Buick repeated this move six years later when in 1931 it was announced that all cars would be produced with straight-eight engines. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, this 1931 Buick Series 50 Sedan displays the unchanged, classic styling that was continued from the previous year. Interestingly, the 220 cubic-inch straight-eight engine shared no interchangeable parts with any of the other eights used by Buick. The 114-inch wheelbase was brought over from Marquette, Buick's discontinued sister make. The interior of the Series 50 came equipped with either mohair or cloth upholstery and carpeting throughout. It also featured dome lights, arm rests, an adjustable drivers seat, and a rear foot rail. Several comfort options such as door-mounted stowage sleeves, an ash tray, passenger grip handles, and a wooden dash trim piece are also included on this Buick. This car also comes equipped with an oil temperature regulator that cools the oil at high temperatures and warms it when cold. This 1931 Series 50 easily lives up to Buick's well-known Motto, When better automobiles are built Buick will build them With minor restorative effort and a good cleaning, this Buick will provide years of enjoyment to its thrilled new owner.
220 cid straight-eight engine, 77 HP, three-speed manual transmission with single reverse gear, semi-elliptic leaf springs with a semi-floating rear axle, four-wheel mech...moreanical brakes; wheelbase: 114". One of the oldest automotive manufacturers in the United States, Buick's early success can be attributed to its development of the valve-in-head engine, known today as the overhead-valve engine. The first production Buick, the Model B, was very well-engineered even by modern standards, and was received well by the public. Headed by William "Billy" Durant who was a natural promoter, Buick moved into first place as the largest automotive manufacturer in America. It is reasonable to say that without Buick, there would not have been a General Motors, as Durant used Buick's profits to finance the corporations establishment. From then onward, Buick continued to impress consumers by taking the checkered flag at the first-ever race held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Buick introduced the Model D in 1907, which was the brands first full-size car. Buick's popularity was growing overseas as well, particularly in the Chinese Empire where it was regarded as a prestigious automobile that was driven by high-level politicians and even the Emperor. In 1914, Buick made its first six-cylinder motor and ten years later, detachable cylinder heads and four-wheel brakes were introduced. In 1925, the company abruptly opted out of producing four-cylinder motors, and all Buick's from then on used sixes. Buick repeated this move six years later when in 1931 it was announced that all cars would be produced with straight-eight engines. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, this 1931 Buick Series 50 Sedan displays the unchanged, classic styling that was continued from the previous year. Interestingly, the 220 cubic-inch straight-eight engine shared no interchangeable parts with any of the other eights used by Buick. The 114-inch wheelbase was brought over from Marquette, Buick's discontinued sister make. The interior of the Series 50 came equipped with either mohair or cloth upholstery and carpeting throughout. It also featured dome lights, arm rests, an adjustable drivers seat, and a rear foot rail. Several comfort options such as door-mounted stowage sleeves, an ash tray, passenger grip handles, and a wooden dash trim piece are also included on this Buick. This car also comes equipped with an oil temperature regulator that cools the oil at high temperatures and warms it when cold. This 1931 Series 50 easily lives up to Buick's well-known Motto, When better automobiles are built Buick will build them With minor restorative effort and a good cleaning, this Buick will provide years of enjoyment to its thrilled new owner.

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1929 Nash Advanced Six Four-Door Sedan

Lot # 507      

278 cid OHV inline six-cylinder engine, 78 HP, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, semi-floating rear axle, four-wheel mechanical drum brakes; wheelbase: 113" For Nash Motors, the year 1924 was one of sweeping changes. In this year, the "Special Six" replaced the long-running four-cylinder Nash, and four-wheel brakes made their emergence. For Nash, the Twenties can be summed up as a period of competition against their primary competitor, Hudson. Produced in the mid to late Twenties, the Advanced Six series embodies Nash's philosophy of producing solid, quality cars at practical prices. Though regarded as the top-of-the-line car for the brand, the Advanced Six still sold at a fair, affordable and reasonable price. This beautiful Advanced Six Four-Door Sedan, offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, represents Nash's top-of-the-line car for the 1929 production year. The Series 460 also denoted the last time a six-cylinder car would hold that position in the Nash lineup. Attractively styled, this car had several design similarities to the La Salle. These design influences are most visibly mirrored in the extended wheelbase and flowing curvature of the Advanced Six. 1929 is commonly recognized as the best year for Nash, with the Six featuring a dual ignition system and two spark plugs per cylinder exactly like the Duesenberg. Nash's signature overhead-valves were used on this motor and it also was equipped with seven main bearings. These modifications enabled the Advanced Six motor to increase from a rating of 70 to 78 horsepower, a considerable jump at the time. This type of engine would be used by Nash for the next 10 years. The interior of this Advanced Six includes all-chrome brightwork, the first time this was offered in the Nash motorcar. Combine this with the dark blue velour interior, elegantly accented by pull down shades and a hardwood dash and this Nash is quite the looker. In 1930, with the introduction of the straight-eight engine Nash marketed a "Twin-Ignition Eight" as their new high-level marque. The Advanced Six lost its place and was replaced by the "Twin-Ignition Six" While the entry level "Single Six", retained many of the styling features of the Standard Six from 1929, the Twin-Ignition Six was more of a watered-down version of its eight-cylinder big brother. Overall, given a good cleaning and some minor restorative effort, this Nash Advanced Six, the last of its kind, is certain to provide years of fun and enjoyment.
278 cid OHV inline six-cylinder engine, 78 HP, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, semi-floating rear ax...morele, four-wheel mechanical drum brakes; wheelbase: 113" For Nash Motors, the year 1924 was one of sweeping changes. In this year, the "Special Six" replaced the long-running four-cylinder Nash, and four-wheel brakes made their emergence. For Nash, the Twenties can be summed up as a period of competition against their primary competitor, Hudson. Produced in the mid to late Twenties, the Advanced Six series embodies Nash's philosophy of producing solid, quality cars at practical prices. Though regarded as the top-of-the-line car for the brand, the Advanced Six still sold at a fair, affordable and reasonable price. This beautiful Advanced Six Four-Door Sedan, offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, represents Nash's top-of-the-line car for the 1929 production year. The Series 460 also denoted the last time a six-cylinder car would hold that position in the Nash lineup. Attractively styled, this car had several design similarities to the La Salle. These design influences are most visibly mirrored in the extended wheelbase and flowing curvature of the Advanced Six. 1929 is commonly recognized as the best year for Nash, with the Six featuring a dual ignition system and two spark plugs per cylinder exactly like the Duesenberg. Nash's signature overhead-valves were used on this motor and it also was equipped with seven main bearings. These modifications enabled the Advanced Six motor to increase from a rating of 70 to 78 horsepower, a considerable jump at the time. This type of engine would be used by Nash for the next 10 years. The interior of this Advanced Six includes all-chrome brightwork, the first time this was offered in the Nash motorcar. Combine this with the dark blue velour interior, elegantly accented by pull down shades and a hardwood dash and this Nash is quite the looker. In 1930, with the introduction of the straight-eight engine Nash marketed a "Twin-Ignition Eight" as their new high-level marque. The Advanced Six lost its place and was replaced by the "Twin-Ignition Six" While the entry level "Single Six", retained many of the styling features of the Standard Six from 1929, the Twin-Ignition Six was more of a watered-down version of its eight-cylinder big brother. Overall, given a good cleaning and some minor restorative effort, this Nash Advanced Six, the last of its kind, is certain to provide years of fun and enjoyment.

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1947 Crosley CC Sedan

Lot # 504      

44 cid OHC four-cylinder engine, 26 HP, three-speed manual transmission, leaf spring suspension, four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase: 80" America has always maintained an on-or-off relationship with the subcompact class of automobiles. While almost all of today's major automotive manufacturers include a subcompact car in their lineup, this was not always the case. In the late 1930s, more than 30 years before America's fuel crisis, a small independent manufacturer called Crosley Motors set up shop in Cincinnati, Ohio. Production of the Crosley got off to a rather slow start in 1939 and was further interrupted by World War II production. After the war was over, Crosley accomplished several significant innovations within the industry. On top of producing the first affordable mass-market car with an overhead camshaft engine, Crosley was the first company to use the term Sports Utility. In the late 1940s, Crosley began producing a convertible station wagon as well as the first post-war sports car, called the Hotshot. Crosleys were lightweight, body-on-frame cars with rigid front and rear axles, a wheelbase around 80 inches, four-wheel caliper type disc brakes, and a compact 61 cubic-inch engine. Indeed, amongst the cars of the late 1940s, the Crosley certainly was an oddball. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, this adorable little 1947 Crosley sedan is as intriguing as it is interesting. Upon resuming civilian car production in 1946, Crosley, with help from Kaiser/Frazer, introduced its newly designed model CC Four. While many manufacturers were slow to transition and update their products, Crosley built 4,999 units its first post-war production year. This number increased greatly for 1947, with more than 22,500 subcompacts rolling off the assembly line. The CC Four was powered by the Cobra engine referring to its copper brazed construction. These engines, originally developed for military use in generators and refrigeration compressors, were made from sheet metal. Fitted with an overhead camshaft, the "Mighty Tin" motor produced an output of 26.5 horsepower while maintaining excellent fuel economy of 35 or more miles per gallon. It was this forward-thinking economical platform which made the Crosley perfect for any service-oriented tasks, whether in the city or country. In the early 1950s, the Big Three automakers began to introduce larger and more extravagant cars, some of which costed only a little more than a Crosley. By 1952, the company ceased all automotive production, fulfilled a few outstanding government contracts, and closed its doors. The Crosley automobile easily sparks curiosity of onlookers, and it is sure to generate keen interest at every stop.
44 cid OHC four-cylinder engine, 26 HP, three-speed manual transmission, leaf spring suspension, four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase: 80" America has always maintained a...moren on-or-off relationship with the subcompact class of automobiles. While almost all of today's major automotive manufacturers include a subcompact car in their lineup, this was not always the case. In the late 1930s, more than 30 years before America's fuel crisis, a small independent manufacturer called Crosley Motors set up shop in Cincinnati, Ohio. Production of the Crosley got off to a rather slow start in 1939 and was further interrupted by World War II production. After the war was over, Crosley accomplished several significant innovations within the industry. On top of producing the first affordable mass-market car with an overhead camshaft engine, Crosley was the first company to use the term Sports Utility. In the late 1940s, Crosley began producing a convertible station wagon as well as the first post-war sports car, called the Hotshot. Crosleys were lightweight, body-on-frame cars with rigid front and rear axles, a wheelbase around 80 inches, four-wheel caliper type disc brakes, and a compact 61 cubic-inch engine. Indeed, amongst the cars of the late 1940s, the Crosley certainly was an oddball. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, this adorable little 1947 Crosley sedan is as intriguing as it is interesting. Upon resuming civilian car production in 1946, Crosley, with help from Kaiser/Frazer, introduced its newly designed model CC Four. While many manufacturers were slow to transition and update their products, Crosley built 4,999 units its first post-war production year. This number increased greatly for 1947, with more than 22,500 subcompacts rolling off the assembly line. The CC Four was powered by the Cobra engine referring to its copper brazed construction. These engines, originally developed for military use in generators and refrigeration compressors, were made from sheet metal. Fitted with an overhead camshaft, the "Mighty Tin" motor produced an output of 26.5 horsepower while maintaining excellent fuel economy of 35 or more miles per gallon. It was this forward-thinking economical platform which made the Crosley perfect for any service-oriented tasks, whether in the city or country. In the early 1950s, the Big Three automakers began to introduce larger and more extravagant cars, some of which costed only a little more than a Crosley. By 1952, the company ceased all automotive production, fulfilled a few outstanding government contracts, and closed its doors. The Crosley automobile easily sparks curiosity of onlookers, and it is sure to generate keen interest at every stop.

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1941 Packard 160 Sedan

Lot # 508      

356 cid L-head straight-eight engine, 160 HP, three-speed synchromesh manual transmission, independent front suspension and live rear axle four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes; wheelbase: 138" By the end of the 1930s, Packard, with the ingenious help of its interchangeable single production line, managed to succeed where other luxury automakers had failed. The launch of the lower cost One-Twenty Series allowed Packard to weather the Great Depression. By 1938, Franklin, Marmon, Ruxton, Stearns-Knight, Stutz, Duesenberg, and Pierce-Arrow had closed shop. At the beginning of the 1940s, Packard's lineup underwent many significant changes. A new mainstream series called the One-Ten took the place of the Packard Six, followed by the One-Twenty. The senior level started with the Super Eight One-Sixty followed by the Custom Super Eight One-Eighty. The legendary Packard Twelve was discontinued after 1939, with the hugely successful 356 cubic-inch straight eight becoming the engine-of-choice for the top-of-the-line cars. Offering 160-horsepower, ultra-smooth operation, and exceptional torque, the eight easily took the place of its big brother. After a successful year, Packard introduced its 19th Series in September of 1940. The 19 Series cars received a few minor updates while retaining much of the body redesigns developed in the previous year. With a robust eight-cylinder engine and independent front suspension, Packard Super Eight models delivered a smooth, soft and responsive ride. It is not surprising that the One-Sixty cars remain highly desirable to this day, certainly a result of their drivability, quality workmanship, and of course the majestic image of the Packard automobile. Just 3,535 examples of the Super Eight One-Sixty were produced during the 1941 19th Series production run. Available from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this handsome 1941 Packard One-Sixty. Comprising of a single tone black paint job, this stately looking automobile provides onlookers with a captivating image of a time when American existentialism was at its highest in the immediate prewar era. Equipped with the synchromesh transmission and a 160-horsepower straight-eight motor, this Packard will deliver a smooth and graceful ride. The interior includes light gray upholstery, a pushbutton AM radio, dash clock, and fuel gauge. This is just one of 300 models produced with dual side-mounted spares enclosed by sleek covers. Last driven in 1974, this One-Sixty has only 33,000 miles on the odometer, so it certainly has a lot of enjoyment left to offer. Cast a bid and don't miss this attractive opportunity to own a low mileage prewar upper-echelon Packard.
356 cid L-head straight-eight engine, 160 HP, three-speed synchromesh manual transmission, independent front suspension and live rear axle four-wheel hydraulic drum brake...mores; wheelbase: 138" By the end of the 1930s, Packard, with the ingenious help of its interchangeable single production line, managed to succeed where other luxury automakers had failed. The launch of the lower cost One-Twenty Series allowed Packard to weather the Great Depression. By 1938, Franklin, Marmon, Ruxton, Stearns-Knight, Stutz, Duesenberg, and Pierce-Arrow had closed shop. At the beginning of the 1940s, Packard's lineup underwent many significant changes. A new mainstream series called the One-Ten took the place of the Packard Six, followed by the One-Twenty. The senior level started with the Super Eight One-Sixty followed by the Custom Super Eight One-Eighty. The legendary Packard Twelve was discontinued after 1939, with the hugely successful 356 cubic-inch straight eight becoming the engine-of-choice for the top-of-the-line cars. Offering 160-horsepower, ultra-smooth operation, and exceptional torque, the eight easily took the place of its big brother. After a successful year, Packard introduced its 19th Series in September of 1940. The 19 Series cars received a few minor updates while retaining much of the body redesigns developed in the previous year. With a robust eight-cylinder engine and independent front suspension, Packard Super Eight models delivered a smooth, soft and responsive ride. It is not surprising that the One-Sixty cars remain highly desirable to this day, certainly a result of their drivability, quality workmanship, and of course the majestic image of the Packard automobile. Just 3,535 examples of the Super Eight One-Sixty were produced during the 1941 19th Series production run. Available from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this handsome 1941 Packard One-Sixty. Comprising of a single tone black paint job, this stately looking automobile provides onlookers with a captivating image of a time when American existentialism was at its highest in the immediate prewar era. Equipped with the synchromesh transmission and a 160-horsepower straight-eight motor, this Packard will deliver a smooth and graceful ride. The interior includes light gray upholstery, a pushbutton AM radio, dash clock, and fuel gauge. This is just one of 300 models produced with dual side-mounted spares enclosed by sleek covers. Last driven in 1974, this One-Sixty has only 33,000 miles on the odometer, so it certainly has a lot of enjoyment left to offer. Cast a bid and don't miss this attractive opportunity to own a low mileage prewar upper-echelon Packard.

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1920 Dodge Brothers Touring

Lot # 505      

212 cid L-head inline four-cylinder engine, 30 HP, three-speed manual transmission with single reverse gear, semi-elliptic front and 3/4 elliptic rear leaf spring suspension, rear-wheel mechanical drum braking system; wheelbase: 114" The Dodge brand started out by supplying engines and transmissions to Ransom Eli Olds and Henry Ford. Finally, in 1914, brothers John and Horace decided to take a shot at their own automotive manufacturing gig. The first Dodge was a strongly built car, assembled with a welded all-steel body, a 12-volt electrical system, and powered by a 212 cubic-inch four-cylinder engine. With the success of this initial design, the brothers sought little change in the all-around construction of their machines over the next decade. With around 45,000 cars leaving the Dodge Brothers factory in Detroit by the end of 1915, the Brothers had made a milestone achievement for the Domestic auto industry's best first-year performance to that date. By the 1919 model year, Dodge expanded its range to eight models. The following year, it went on to introduce its most significant styling change yet by raking the windshield backward. At this point, sales of the Model 30 were second only to Ford. Available from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this well-kept 1920 Dodge Model 30 Touring. This Dodge proves that while the early Packards, Duesenbergs, and Pierce-Arrows get most of the attention, they don't get all the attraction. With its sliding gear transmission and floor-mounted controls, the Model 30 Dodge was an easier, more modern alternative to Ford's T. It has quite clearly been cared for and it still shows its black paint job very nicely. The interior of this Dodge has maintained its patina and presents equally well. Dash mounted instrumentation on this car includes an amperemeter, oil meter, and speedometer and options include front and rear bumpers, a spare tire, and a radiator-mounted Motometer. This Dodge retains its original motor, the reliable and capable 212 four-cylinder. Unfortunately, both John and Horace Dodge passed away in 1920 as a result of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic. It was not long after their deaths that their company went into a period of steep decline. With the brothers widows having sold the company off to investors, Dodge fell to 13th place in the U.S. industry rankings and by 1928 it was acquired by Walter P. Chrysler. Using Dodge as an affordable option to complement his more upmarket Chryslers, the brand rose back to 5th place in the manufacturing league albeit as a Chrysler subsidiary. This Dodge Model 30 is a great preservation candidate and it has many years left in its rare period splendor.
212 cid L-head inline four-cylinder engine, 30 HP, three-speed manual transmission with single reverse gear, semi-elliptic front and 3/4 elliptic rear leaf spring suspens...moreion, rear-wheel mechanical drum braking system; wheelbase: 114" The Dodge brand started out by supplying engines and transmissions to Ransom Eli Olds and Henry Ford. Finally, in 1914, brothers John and Horace decided to take a shot at their own automotive manufacturing gig. The first Dodge was a strongly built car, assembled with a welded all-steel body, a 12-volt electrical system, and powered by a 212 cubic-inch four-cylinder engine. With the success of this initial design, the brothers sought little change in the all-around construction of their machines over the next decade. With around 45,000 cars leaving the Dodge Brothers factory in Detroit by the end of 1915, the Brothers had made a milestone achievement for the Domestic auto industry's best first-year performance to that date. By the 1919 model year, Dodge expanded its range to eight models. The following year, it went on to introduce its most significant styling change yet by raking the windshield backward. At this point, sales of the Model 30 were second only to Ford. Available from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this well-kept 1920 Dodge Model 30 Touring. This Dodge proves that while the early Packards, Duesenbergs, and Pierce-Arrows get most of the attention, they don't get all the attraction. With its sliding gear transmission and floor-mounted controls, the Model 30 Dodge was an easier, more modern alternative to Ford's T. It has quite clearly been cared for and it still shows its black paint job very nicely. The interior of this Dodge has maintained its patina and presents equally well. Dash mounted instrumentation on this car includes an amperemeter, oil meter, and speedometer and options include front and rear bumpers, a spare tire, and a radiator-mounted Motometer. This Dodge retains its original motor, the reliable and capable 212 four-cylinder. Unfortunately, both John and Horace Dodge passed away in 1920 as a result of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic. It was not long after their deaths that their company went into a period of steep decline. With the brothers widows having sold the company off to investors, Dodge fell to 13th place in the U.S. industry rankings and by 1928 it was acquired by Walter P. Chrysler. Using Dodge as an affordable option to complement his more upmarket Chryslers, the brand rose back to 5th place in the manufacturing league albeit as a Chrysler subsidiary. This Dodge Model 30 is a great preservation candidate and it has many years left in its rare period splendor.

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1949 Buick Super Sedan

Lot # 502      

248 cid inline eight-cylinder engine, 115 HP, three-speed manual transmission, independent front coil spring suspension, four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase: 121" After World War II ended, Buick, like most other manufacturers, picked up exactly where they had left off prior to the War. Finally, in 1948, Buick's Super received a long-awaited redesign. The newly released Supers of 1949 rode on a 121-inch wheelbase and shared the C-Body platform which was made popular on the Buick Roadmaster. Several other Roadmaster styling cues were visible on the Super which made it a very strong mid-range contestant. The Super also featured VentiPorts on the front fenders. Known also as portholes, the Super models had three per fender and the larger, more upscale Roadmasters had four. Though Buick's advertising initially claimed that these helped cool the engine compartment, they eventually became plugged later in the production year. The sporty and prestigious look of the redesigned Super was widely popular amongst consumers and more than 22,000 were sold worldwide. Also carried over from the Roadmaster, albeit as an option, was the Dynaflow automatic transmission. Originally debuting in 1948 only as an option on the Roadmaster, it became available on Super models as well for 1949. When coupled to the 248 cubic-inch version of Buick's overhead-valve straight eight powerplant, the Dynaflow gave the car a comfortable, even stream of power. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this majestic looking single-tone black 1949 Buick Super sedan with the tried and true standard shift transmission. This car is notably recognized for its beautifully molded chrome grille, fender guards, and of course the Super's script which is found just above the full-length body fender molding on both front fenders. The Super's standard exterior options included newly designed taillights which were mounted on the rear fender edges, chrome embossed fender tips, and fender skirts. Fender top parking lamps and full-wheel trim discs were also standard equipment on this well-optioned car. The interior includes standard cloth upholstery, a cigar lighter, ashtray, and an automatic choke. With a good cleaning, this Buick Super would make an excellent show car. After several more redesigns, the Buick Super's sales dwindled, and in 1958 it was discontinued. Though it had no direct replacement, the Invicta is thought to be a likely successor to the Super, albeit with vastly different styling. Cast a bid on this gorgeous 1949 Super and own the car which Buick described as a "Big Buy in a Tidy Package".
248 cid inline eight-cylinder engine, 115 HP, three-speed manual transmission, independent front coil spring suspension, four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase: 121" After Wor...moreld War II ended, Buick, like most other manufacturers, picked up exactly where they had left off prior to the War. Finally, in 1948, Buick's Super received a long-awaited redesign. The newly released Supers of 1949 rode on a 121-inch wheelbase and shared the C-Body platform which was made popular on the Buick Roadmaster. Several other Roadmaster styling cues were visible on the Super which made it a very strong mid-range contestant. The Super also featured VentiPorts on the front fenders. Known also as portholes, the Super models had three per fender and the larger, more upscale Roadmasters had four. Though Buick's advertising initially claimed that these helped cool the engine compartment, they eventually became plugged later in the production year. The sporty and prestigious look of the redesigned Super was widely popular amongst consumers and more than 22,000 were sold worldwide. Also carried over from the Roadmaster, albeit as an option, was the Dynaflow automatic transmission. Originally debuting in 1948 only as an option on the Roadmaster, it became available on Super models as well for 1949. When coupled to the 248 cubic-inch version of Buick's overhead-valve straight eight powerplant, the Dynaflow gave the car a comfortable, even stream of power. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this majestic looking single-tone black 1949 Buick Super sedan with the tried and true standard shift transmission. This car is notably recognized for its beautifully molded chrome grille, fender guards, and of course the Super's script which is found just above the full-length body fender molding on both front fenders. The Super's standard exterior options included newly designed taillights which were mounted on the rear fender edges, chrome embossed fender tips, and fender skirts. Fender top parking lamps and full-wheel trim discs were also standard equipment on this well-optioned car. The interior includes standard cloth upholstery, a cigar lighter, ashtray, and an automatic choke. With a good cleaning, this Buick Super would make an excellent show car. After several more redesigns, the Buick Super's sales dwindled, and in 1958 it was discontinued. Though it had no direct replacement, the Invicta is thought to be a likely successor to the Super, albeit with vastly different styling. Cast a bid on this gorgeous 1949 Super and own the car which Buick described as a "Big Buy in a Tidy Package".

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1927 Nash Standard Six Two-Door Sedan

Lot # 506      

184 cid OHV inline six-cylinder engine, 45 HP, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel mechanical drum brakes; wheelbase: 113" Undoubtedly, Charles W. Nash has one of the most interesting life stories of all the captains of the early automotive industry. Born in 1864 in Illinois, he was abandoned at the age of six by his parents and put in the custody of a Michigan farmer by the district court. In return for working on the farm, young Charles was to receive room, board, and three months of schooling per year until the age of 21 when he was to be given $100 and a new suit of clothes to go off on his own. After running away at the age of 12, Nash worked in a slew of different jobs, eventually ending up as a cushion stuffer for the Flint Road Cart Company owned by none other than Billy Durant and J. Dallas Dort. After rising through the ranks, he ended up heading the Durant-Dort Carriage Company, followed by Buick, then General Motors, and finally in 1916 he ventured out to form his own company. Thus, in 1916, Nash Motors was born. Nash competed with Hudson and produced a single line of overhead valve six-cylinder cars which sold for a moderate price comparable to Oldsmobile. In the early 1920s, Nash briefly offered an even lower cost four-cylinder model, but this was ultimately scrapped and replaced by a smaller six which became known as the Special. An entry level Nash was added, known at first as the Ajax Six Series 220, then as the Light Six, and finally as the Standard Six. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this all original 1928 Standard Six. A well-kept museum car, this cream and black colored Nash looks delightfully charming. Equipped with four-wheel brakes, Nah provided its driver with "absolute safety" which was guaranteed as the Worlds Finest 4-Wheel Brakes The interior combination create the classic look of the late 20s business sedan. A beautifully kept oak dashboard adorned with timelessly appealing, simplistic original instrumentation gives this Standard Six all it needs to be a serious competitor in the preservation class. The Standard Six would only be offered for one more year upon which it was phased out and replaced by the Series 450 - Single Six. By this time, Nash would gradually begin to phase out their six-cylinder engine in favor of the new straight-eight. Eventually, in the late 1930s, Nash acquired Kelvinator, and finally went on to merge with Hudson to form American Motors Corporation in 1954. The history of Nash Motors is truly fascinating, making this wonderfully preserved 1928 Standard Six even more intriguing.
184 cid OHV inline six-cylinder engine, 45 HP, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel mechanical...more drum brakes; wheelbase: 113" Undoubtedly, Charles W. Nash has one of the most interesting life stories of all the captains of the early automotive industry. Born in 1864 in Illinois, he was abandoned at the age of six by his parents and put in the custody of a Michigan farmer by the district court. In return for working on the farm, young Charles was to receive room, board, and three months of schooling per year until the age of 21 when he was to be given $100 and a new suit of clothes to go off on his own. After running away at the age of 12, Nash worked in a slew of different jobs, eventually ending up as a cushion stuffer for the Flint Road Cart Company owned by none other than Billy Durant and J. Dallas Dort. After rising through the ranks, he ended up heading the Durant-Dort Carriage Company, followed by Buick, then General Motors, and finally in 1916 he ventured out to form his own company. Thus, in 1916, Nash Motors was born. Nash competed with Hudson and produced a single line of overhead valve six-cylinder cars which sold for a moderate price comparable to Oldsmobile. In the early 1920s, Nash briefly offered an even lower cost four-cylinder model, but this was ultimately scrapped and replaced by a smaller six which became known as the Special. An entry level Nash was added, known at first as the Ajax Six Series 220, then as the Light Six, and finally as the Standard Six. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this all original 1928 Standard Six. A well-kept museum car, this cream and black colored Nash looks delightfully charming. Equipped with four-wheel brakes, Nah provided its driver with "absolute safety" which was guaranteed as the Worlds Finest 4-Wheel Brakes The interior combination create the classic look of the late 20s business sedan. A beautifully kept oak dashboard adorned with timelessly appealing, simplistic original instrumentation gives this Standard Six all it needs to be a serious competitor in the preservation class. The Standard Six would only be offered for one more year upon which it was phased out and replaced by the Series 450 - Single Six. By this time, Nash would gradually begin to phase out their six-cylinder engine in favor of the new straight-eight. Eventually, in the late 1930s, Nash acquired Kelvinator, and finally went on to merge with Hudson to form American Motors Corporation in 1954. The history of Nash Motors is truly fascinating, making this wonderfully preserved 1928 Standard Six even more intriguing.

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1962 Studebaker Gran Turismo Hawk Coupe

Lot # 512      

289 cid V-8 engine, 210 HP, four-speed automatic transmission, independent coil spring front suspension, semi-elliptic rear axle, four-wheel finned drum brakes; wheelbase: 121" In 1954, Studebaker was purchased by Packard. The latter envisioned that the formera's large dealer network would help sell more Packard's. Meanwhile Studebaker anticipated building itself back up with the availability of Packard's bank account. Packard president James J. Nice hoped that the newly created Packard-Studebaker Corporation would then stabilize its balance sheets and product lines, form yet another merger with the Nash-Kelvinator Corporation, and assimilate the Hudson Motor Car Company as well to form American Motors. As complicated as it sounds, this would have immediately placed the American Motors Corporation ahead of Chrysler, making it the third component of America's Big Three. Unfortunately, the sudden death of Nash-Kelvinator’s president ultimately sunk the deal and sealed the fate of all four companies. Despite the turmoil, one of Studebaker's most interesting products came about during these years when in 1956 the Studebaker Golden Hawk was introduced. The Hawk took design influences from the earlier Champion models, but differed with the addition of a large, nearly vertical grille. A raised hood line was also added in order to accommodate Packard's 352 cubic-inch V-8. With an excellent power-to-weight ratio, the Golden Hawk was second in power to only the Chrysler 300B, essentially a street-legal race car. The late-1950s recession hit Studebaker-Packard hard, and the Golden Hawk was discontinued, its position ultimately taken over by the Silver Hawk, which was itself replaced by the last of the Hawk series, the Gran Turismo. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this 1962 Studebaker Gran Turismo Hawk. This car has a unique style that was cleverly thought up by Brooks Stevens who used the prior Hawks only as a starting point. The grille, for example, was borrowed inspiration from Mercedes-Benz while the rear end of the car closely resembles that of a Lincoln Continental, and the roofline of a Ford Thunderbird. All these different influences are combined in the Hawk to give it a unique, easily noticeable Euro-American style. This GT Hawk is equipped with Studebaker's 289 cubic-inch V-8, capable of producing 210 horsepower. Other options on this car include the four-speed Flight-O-Matic transmission, a clock, and a tachometer. Well worth the restorative effort, this GT Hawk is a collectible car that is bound to generate a lot of special interest when it returns to its former glory on the road.
289 cid V-8 engine, 210 HP, four-speed automatic transmission, independent coil spring front suspension, semi-elliptic rear axle, four-wheel finned drum brakes; wheelbase...more: 121" In 1954, Studebaker was purchased by Packard. The latter envisioned that the formera's large dealer network would help sell more Packard's. Meanwhile Studebaker anticipated building itself back up with the availability of Packard's bank account. Packard president James J. Nice hoped that the newly created Packard-Studebaker Corporation would then stabilize its balance sheets and product lines, form yet another merger with the Nash-Kelvinator Corporation, and assimilate the Hudson Motor Car Company as well to form American Motors. As complicated as it sounds, this would have immediately placed the American Motors Corporation ahead of Chrysler, making it the third component of America's Big Three. Unfortunately, the sudden death of Nash-Kelvinator’s president ultimately sunk the deal and sealed the fate of all four companies. Despite the turmoil, one of Studebaker's most interesting products came about during these years when in 1956 the Studebaker Golden Hawk was introduced. The Hawk took design influences from the earlier Champion models, but differed with the addition of a large, nearly vertical grille. A raised hood line was also added in order to accommodate Packard's 352 cubic-inch V-8. With an excellent power-to-weight ratio, the Golden Hawk was second in power to only the Chrysler 300B, essentially a street-legal race car. The late-1950s recession hit Studebaker-Packard hard, and the Golden Hawk was discontinued, its position ultimately taken over by the Silver Hawk, which was itself replaced by the last of the Hawk series, the Gran Turismo. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this 1962 Studebaker Gran Turismo Hawk. This car has a unique style that was cleverly thought up by Brooks Stevens who used the prior Hawks only as a starting point. The grille, for example, was borrowed inspiration from Mercedes-Benz while the rear end of the car closely resembles that of a Lincoln Continental, and the roofline of a Ford Thunderbird. All these different influences are combined in the Hawk to give it a unique, easily noticeable Euro-American style. This GT Hawk is equipped with Studebaker's 289 cubic-inch V-8, capable of producing 210 horsepower. Other options on this car include the four-speed Flight-O-Matic transmission, a clock, and a tachometer. Well worth the restorative effort, this GT Hawk is a collectible car that is bound to generate a lot of special interest when it returns to its former glory on the road.

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1931 Plymouth PA Sedan

Lot # 509      

196.1 cid L-head inline four-cylinder engine, 56 HP, three-speed manual transmission with free-wheeling, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes; wheelbase: 109" Up until the late 1920's, Ford and Chevrolet dominated the lower price automotive market. Chrysler Corporation President Billy Durant took note of this, and in 1928 he introduced the Plymouth automobile. This move turned out to be a lifesaver for the Chrysler Corporation and many believed that the company could not have weathered the Great Depression without a lower-end model. Being new to the low-end market, Durant relied on innovative engineering and technological advancement to make his Plymouth's more vendible than the competition. Not surprisingly, Durant's plan worked well and the new and totally redesigned PA Model Plymouth outperformed the expectations of both consumers and dealers alike. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, this 1931 Plymouth PA Sedan exemplifies that ingenuity and fluidity have been a longstanding tradition of the Chrysler Corporation. The Plymouth PA was the first low-priced car to include a combination of four-wheel hydraulic brakes, free wheeling, an independent front suspension, a double drop frame, full instrumentation, and full pressure engine lubrication. It is also equipped with floating power, a new means by which the engine was secured to the chassis with rubber-lined brackets at the fore and aft points. By suspending the engine along the car's center of gravity, torsional vibrations were greatly reduced allowing the car to run much smoother than the Fords or Chevy's. The PA is also handsomely designed, with a decorative grille, a rounded chrome radiator shell, and a double drop frame which give the car a much lower profile. Plymouth's four-cylinder L-head motor produced 56 horsepower, which was extremely notable in a day when that type of performance was barely achieved by sixes. Produced into the 1950,s, the Plymouth four gained a reputation for its excellent performance and terrific fuel economy, producing up to 25 miles per gallon. Plymouth's innovative nature was, from the very beginning, engrained into the brand itself. It is not coincidental that the Mayflower, depicted on the Plymouth emblem, equates the brand's pioneering spirit with that of the Pilgrims. Just after the introduction of the PA, a four-door sedan not unlike this one was driven from San Francisco to New York by two Chrysler employees, setting a new speed record and smashing one that was set in a much more expensive eight-cylinder Franklin. With a restoration, this 1931 PA will continue to uphold the legacy of the reliable and revolutionary Plymouth machine.
196.1 cid L-head inline four-cylinder engine, 56 HP, three-speed manual transmission with free-wheeling, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf sprin...moregs, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes; wheelbase: 109" Up until the late 1920's, Ford and Chevrolet dominated the lower price automotive market. Chrysler Corporation President Billy Durant took note of this, and in 1928 he introduced the Plymouth automobile. This move turned out to be a lifesaver for the Chrysler Corporation and many believed that the company could not have weathered the Great Depression without a lower-end model. Being new to the low-end market, Durant relied on innovative engineering and technological advancement to make his Plymouth's more vendible than the competition. Not surprisingly, Durant's plan worked well and the new and totally redesigned PA Model Plymouth outperformed the expectations of both consumers and dealers alike. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, this 1931 Plymouth PA Sedan exemplifies that ingenuity and fluidity have been a longstanding tradition of the Chrysler Corporation. The Plymouth PA was the first low-priced car to include a combination of four-wheel hydraulic brakes, free wheeling, an independent front suspension, a double drop frame, full instrumentation, and full pressure engine lubrication. It is also equipped with floating power, a new means by which the engine was secured to the chassis with rubber-lined brackets at the fore and aft points. By suspending the engine along the car's center of gravity, torsional vibrations were greatly reduced allowing the car to run much smoother than the Fords or Chevy's. The PA is also handsomely designed, with a decorative grille, a rounded chrome radiator shell, and a double drop frame which give the car a much lower profile. Plymouth's four-cylinder L-head motor produced 56 horsepower, which was extremely notable in a day when that type of performance was barely achieved by sixes. Produced into the 1950,s, the Plymouth four gained a reputation for its excellent performance and terrific fuel economy, producing up to 25 miles per gallon. Plymouth's innovative nature was, from the very beginning, engrained into the brand itself. It is not coincidental that the Mayflower, depicted on the Plymouth emblem, equates the brand's pioneering spirit with that of the Pilgrims. Just after the introduction of the PA, a four-door sedan not unlike this one was driven from San Francisco to New York by two Chrysler employees, setting a new speed record and smashing one that was set in a much more expensive eight-cylinder Franklin. With a restoration, this 1931 PA will continue to uphold the legacy of the reliable and revolutionary Plymouth machine.

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1925 Star Model F-25 Sedan Taxicab

Lot # 513      

152 cid SV four-cylinder Continental engine, 35 HP, three-speed sliding gear transmission, rigid front axle and live rear with semi-elliptic leaf springs, rear mechanical drum brakes; wheelbase: 102" After his dismissal from General Motors in 1920, William Durant introduced several different automobiles including the Durant, Frontenac, Flint, and Northern. The most affordable model was the Star, introduced in 1922 as a competitor to Ford's Model T. The press acclaimed that it was a great deal of car for the money and it was indeed much more advanced than the Model T. The Star used a sliding gear three-speed transmission and a continental engine which was much more easily operated than the planetary units used in the Model T. Put together with Spicer universals, Timken and later Adams axles, the Star was more assembled than it was produced. Not surprisingly, the Star was an immediate hit with consumers. Thousands of people flocked to see the car on its initial introduction, and in less than a year the 100,000th car was produced with rumors that Durant could have sold more if he only had the means to build them. This Star, offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, comes as a Miller Taxicab from Westminster, Maryland. This car is thought to be Maryland's oldest authentic Taxicab in existence. It displays the elegant patina of an early livery car and is featured with Smith headlamps and a Boyce Motometer. It is powered by the Continental four, a manufactured engine that obtained notoriety as a low maintenance proven runner. The Star even enjoyed success as an export, where it was rebadged as the Rugby as to not be confused with the pre-existing British automobile. Regrettably, the Star's success was inseparably tied to that of the Durant Empire. In 1928, just as he was celebrating his 25th anniversary in the automotive industry, Durant was forced to phase out the Star brand in the struggle to save his business. Both the six- and four-cylinder Star models became products within the Durant Motors brand. This was an unfortunate ending for what had, just a few years before, seemed to be a promising run for the Star. While the days of dialing "187" are long gone, the good news is that this Taxi can still be called by placing a bid, so don't miss this once in a lifetime chance to catch this delightful little Star F-25 taxicab.
152 cid SV four-cylinder Continental engine, 35 HP, three-speed sliding gear transmission, rigid front axle and live rear with semi-elliptic leaf springs, rear mechanical...more drum brakes; wheelbase: 102" After his dismissal from General Motors in 1920, William Durant introduced several different automobiles including the Durant, Frontenac, Flint, and Northern. The most affordable model was the Star, introduced in 1922 as a competitor to Ford's Model T. The press acclaimed that it was a great deal of car for the money and it was indeed much more advanced than the Model T. The Star used a sliding gear three-speed transmission and a continental engine which was much more easily operated than the planetary units used in the Model T. Put together with Spicer universals, Timken and later Adams axles, the Star was more assembled than it was produced. Not surprisingly, the Star was an immediate hit with consumers. Thousands of people flocked to see the car on its initial introduction, and in less than a year the 100,000th car was produced with rumors that Durant could have sold more if he only had the means to build them. This Star, offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, comes as a Miller Taxicab from Westminster, Maryland. This car is thought to be Maryland's oldest authentic Taxicab in existence. It displays the elegant patina of an early livery car and is featured with Smith headlamps and a Boyce Motometer. It is powered by the Continental four, a manufactured engine that obtained notoriety as a low maintenance proven runner. The Star even enjoyed success as an export, where it was rebadged as the Rugby as to not be confused with the pre-existing British automobile. Regrettably, the Star's success was inseparably tied to that of the Durant Empire. In 1928, just as he was celebrating his 25th anniversary in the automotive industry, Durant was forced to phase out the Star brand in the struggle to save his business. Both the six- and four-cylinder Star models became products within the Durant Motors brand. This was an unfortunate ending for what had, just a few years before, seemed to be a promising run for the Star. While the days of dialing "187" are long gone, the good news is that this Taxi can still be called by placing a bid, so don't miss this once in a lifetime chance to catch this delightful little Star F-25 taxicab.

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1933 Reo Flying Cloud Sedan

Lot # 510      

230 cid water-cooled Continental I-six engine, 80 HP, Self-Shifter transmission with dual Hi/Lo gearing range, four-wheel brakes; wheelbase: 115" Ransom E. Old's founded many companies within the automotive industry. In 1897, he founded the Old's Motor Vehicle Company, which would eventually become Oldsmobile. In 1905, Old's started the REO Motor Car Company in Lansing, Michigan. Old's also founded several subsidiary firms including the National Coil Company, Michigan Screw Company, and Atlas Drop Forge Company in order to ensure a reliable supply of parts. One of Reo's most memorable cars was the Flying Cloud, introduced in 1927. Equipped with Lockheed's new hydraulic braking system, the Cloud was very advanced for its time. A sleek yet aristocratic look was given to the car with design influences by Fabio Segardi. This Reo Flying Cloud, offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, gracefully accentuates all the artistic charm that Ransom Eli Olds sought to display in his automobiles. Originally purchased by businessman Elvin Lohr, it was acquired by the Museum in the late 1960s for just $750. As stunning as it is to look at, this Reo's most interesting attributes are mechanical. Equipped with the optional "Self-Shifter" semi-automatic transmission, this car is arguably the first of its kind. The Self-Shifter transmission was marketed by Reo in 1931 under a patent which covered device for automatically rendering either one of the two gear ratios effective during different rates of speed of the vehicle. The shifter, a dash-mounted T-handle, is pulled out and pushed back in to toggle between a Hi/Lo gear with two separate ranges available in each selection. Placing the handle in the mid-way position would put the car in neutral and pulling it all the way out with a twist to one side activates the reverse gear. This system proved to be very popular amongst drivers and is thought by many to have been the precursor to Chrysler's well-known "Fluid Drive." The Flying Cloud, as well as the Royale are undoubtedly amongst Reos most recognizable models. Early evidence of streamlining is visual in the skirted, high-crown front fenders. It would only be a few years later, in the mid-1930s, that Reo would shut down its car operation, opting to become a truck manufacturer instead. Don't miss this chance to own this 1933 Reo Flying Cloud - undoubtedly it has one of the most interesting transmissions of the era.
230 cid water-cooled Continental I-six engine, 80 HP, Self-Shifter transmission with dual Hi/Lo gearing range, four-wheel brakes; wheelbase: 115" Ransom E. Old's foun...moreded many companies within the automotive industry. In 1897, he founded the Old's Motor Vehicle Company, which would eventually become Oldsmobile. In 1905, Old's started the REO Motor Car Company in Lansing, Michigan. Old's also founded several subsidiary firms including the National Coil Company, Michigan Screw Company, and Atlas Drop Forge Company in order to ensure a reliable supply of parts. One of Reo's most memorable cars was the Flying Cloud, introduced in 1927. Equipped with Lockheed's new hydraulic braking system, the Cloud was very advanced for its time. A sleek yet aristocratic look was given to the car with design influences by Fabio Segardi. This Reo Flying Cloud, offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, gracefully accentuates all the artistic charm that Ransom Eli Olds sought to display in his automobiles. Originally purchased by businessman Elvin Lohr, it was acquired by the Museum in the late 1960s for just $750. As stunning as it is to look at, this Reo's most interesting attributes are mechanical. Equipped with the optional "Self-Shifter" semi-automatic transmission, this car is arguably the first of its kind. The Self-Shifter transmission was marketed by Reo in 1931 under a patent which covered device for automatically rendering either one of the two gear ratios effective during different rates of speed of the vehicle. The shifter, a dash-mounted T-handle, is pulled out and pushed back in to toggle between a Hi/Lo gear with two separate ranges available in each selection. Placing the handle in the mid-way position would put the car in neutral and pulling it all the way out with a twist to one side activates the reverse gear. This system proved to be very popular amongst drivers and is thought by many to have been the precursor to Chrysler's well-known "Fluid Drive." The Flying Cloud, as well as the Royale are undoubtedly amongst Reos most recognizable models. Early evidence of streamlining is visual in the skirted, high-crown front fenders. It would only be a few years later, in the mid-1930s, that Reo would shut down its car operation, opting to become a truck manufacturer instead. Don't miss this chance to own this 1933 Reo Flying Cloud - undoubtedly it has one of the most interesting transmissions of the era.

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1928 Whippet Model 98 Five-Passenger Sedan

Lot # 514      

178 cid six-cylinder engine, 50 HP, three-speed manual transmission with single reverse gear, front and rear semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel mechanical braking system; wheelbase: 103" The Whippet, aptly named for its swiftness and maneuverability, was one of the most successful short-lived brands in America. The history of the Whippet starts in the early 1900s when the original Overland car was developed by the Standard Wheel Company of Terre Haute, Indiana. In 1907, John North Willys, a major Overland customer, acquired the company, rescuing it from its financial woes. By the start of World War I, Overland's position had strengthened greatly, and only Ford had them beat in terms of production output. In 1926, the Whippet replaced the Overland brand in its entirety. With assistance from Crossley Motors of Great Britain, the Whippet was developed with distinctive European flare. America's smallest car at the time of its introduction, the Whippet proved to be very fascinating and intriguing to consumers. When taken to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for a 24-hour endurance run, a six-cylinder Whippet set an average of 56 miles per hour, a new record for cars costing under $1,000. In fact, the entry level four-cylinder cabriolet cost only $545, which had the Model T beat by five dollars. Adjusted for inflation, that comes out to around $7,900 today; imagine buying a reliable, well-built new car for just $7,900. Offered here from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this attractive tri-tone 1928 Model 98 Whippet. Originally, this car would have sold for around $615 to $745, allowing the Whippet to live up to its title, "The World's Lowest Priced Six". Amazingly, despite the Whippet's low price, standard components included four-wheel mechanical brakes, a seven-bearing crankshaft, full pressure lubrication to all bearings, and Nelson Bohnalite invar strut pistons. This Whippet features a longer wheelbase, more graceful body lines, and an overall artistic look that was not common among lower priced production cars. With a little restorative effort, this adorable Whippet will provide its new owner with years of fun and enjoyment.
178 cid six-cylinder engine, 50 HP, three-speed manual transmission with single reverse gear, front and rear semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel mechanical braking sys...moretem; wheelbase: 103" The Whippet, aptly named for its swiftness and maneuverability, was one of the most successful short-lived brands in America. The history of the Whippet starts in the early 1900s when the original Overland car was developed by the Standard Wheel Company of Terre Haute, Indiana. In 1907, John North Willys, a major Overland customer, acquired the company, rescuing it from its financial woes. By the start of World War I, Overland's position had strengthened greatly, and only Ford had them beat in terms of production output. In 1926, the Whippet replaced the Overland brand in its entirety. With assistance from Crossley Motors of Great Britain, the Whippet was developed with distinctive European flare. America's smallest car at the time of its introduction, the Whippet proved to be very fascinating and intriguing to consumers. When taken to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for a 24-hour endurance run, a six-cylinder Whippet set an average of 56 miles per hour, a new record for cars costing under $1,000. In fact, the entry level four-cylinder cabriolet cost only $545, which had the Model T beat by five dollars. Adjusted for inflation, that comes out to around $7,900 today; imagine buying a reliable, well-built new car for just $7,900. Offered here from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this attractive tri-tone 1928 Model 98 Whippet. Originally, this car would have sold for around $615 to $745, allowing the Whippet to live up to its title, "The World's Lowest Priced Six". Amazingly, despite the Whippet's low price, standard components included four-wheel mechanical brakes, a seven-bearing crankshaft, full pressure lubrication to all bearings, and Nelson Bohnalite invar strut pistons. This Whippet features a longer wheelbase, more graceful body lines, and an overall artistic look that was not common among lower priced production cars. With a little restorative effort, this adorable Whippet will provide its new owner with years of fun and enjoyment.

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1929 Whippet 96A Rumble Seat Coupe

Lot # 515      

134 cid four-cylinder engine, 32 HP, three-speed manual transmission with single reverse gear, front and rear semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel mechanical braking system; wheelbase: 103" When seeking out a common, well-known and reliable pre-war car, most people automatically start their search with the Model A. While Ford's affordable car was well-built, aesthetically pleasing, and plentiful, wouldn't it just mean following the rest of the flock to the blue oval? Less known but equally, if not more, reliable and craftier was the Willys Whippet. A few significant improvements included in the Whippet that would be greatly appreciated by any car owner are four-wheel brakes, a pressurized lubrication system, and a water pump, none of which were available on the Ford. In fact, it is the technological design aspects that set this car so far apart from others of its day. While today, Willys is most commonly associated with their Jeeps and Jeepsters, the Whippet was one of the most widely appreciated cars of the late-1920s. Particularly popular among businessmen and college students, this was a fantastic car that could be relied upon time and time again. The sleeve-valve-six-cylinder engine, developed by Knight, was built by Willys for over 20 years, and other well-known marques that used this engine included Daimler, Mercedes, Voisin, Panhard et Levassor, and Minerva. This 1929 Whippet Model 96A with the economical four-cylinder engine, offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, beautifully displays European influences shown in its small wheelbase narrow body. In fact, John N. Willys had specifically intended the Whippet to be a light, fast, stylish, and economical car. Inexpensively priced to boot, the compact little Whippet boasts a roomy interior that provides a comfortable ride. The car also benefits from its low center of gravity, which assisted in terrific cornering, and its ultra-light weight gave the Whippet great as mileage and plenty of pep in its step. The Whippet's production jumped to an astonishing 100,000 within the first few production years, largely due to the car's performance, handling, and reliability. By 1928, the Whippet was the third best-selling car in the United States. While many Whippets were produced, they are rarely seen across the auction block, so don't miss this chance to own one.
134 cid four-cylinder engine, 32 HP, three-speed manual transmission with single reverse gear, front and rear semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel mechanical braking sy...morestem; wheelbase: 103" When seeking out a common, well-known and reliable pre-war car, most people automatically start their search with the Model A. While Ford's affordable car was well-built, aesthetically pleasing, and plentiful, wouldn't it just mean following the rest of the flock to the blue oval? Less known but equally, if not more, reliable and craftier was the Willys Whippet. A few significant improvements included in the Whippet that would be greatly appreciated by any car owner are four-wheel brakes, a pressurized lubrication system, and a water pump, none of which were available on the Ford. In fact, it is the technological design aspects that set this car so far apart from others of its day. While today, Willys is most commonly associated with their Jeeps and Jeepsters, the Whippet was one of the most widely appreciated cars of the late-1920s. Particularly popular among businessmen and college students, this was a fantastic car that could be relied upon time and time again. The sleeve-valve-six-cylinder engine, developed by Knight, was built by Willys for over 20 years, and other well-known marques that used this engine included Daimler, Mercedes, Voisin, Panhard et Levassor, and Minerva. This 1929 Whippet Model 96A with the economical four-cylinder engine, offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, beautifully displays European influences shown in its small wheelbase narrow body. In fact, John N. Willys had specifically intended the Whippet to be a light, fast, stylish, and economical car. Inexpensively priced to boot, the compact little Whippet boasts a roomy interior that provides a comfortable ride. The car also benefits from its low center of gravity, which assisted in terrific cornering, and its ultra-light weight gave the Whippet great as mileage and plenty of pep in its step. The Whippet's production jumped to an astonishing 100,000 within the first few production years, largely due to the car's performance, handling, and reliability. By 1928, the Whippet was the third best-selling car in the United States. While many Whippets were produced, they are rarely seen across the auction block, so don't miss this chance to own one.

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1922 Cleveland Model 41 Sedan

Lot # 516      

OHV inline six-cylinder engine, 45 HP, three-speed manual transmission with single reverse gear, leaf spring suspension, rear-wheel mechanical drum braking system; wheelbase: 112”
Built in the city for which it was named in Ohio, the Cleveland was a smaller, more modestly built version of the Chandler automobile. Produced in its own independent factory between 1919 and 1926, Cleveland included the overhead valve six-cylinder engine featured on the Chandler but with a smaller chassis, shorter wheelbase, and smaller price tag. Chandler Vice President, George M. Graham, was constantly emphasizing the company’s independence, fighting frequent rumors in the trade press stating otherwise. Sid Black, President of the Cleveland Company, responded by issuing his own press releases that didn’t even mention the Chandler name. In December of 1924, veteran racer Ralph Mulford climbed Mount Wilson in a stock Cleveland Six, setting a new speed record. The following year, Mulford drove another Cleveland Six on a 14-hour long 1000-mile endurance race at the Culver City track, earning yet another record for the car. This turned out to be the marque’s last hoorah, as in December of 1926 the Chandler-Cleveland Corporation was established, putting an official end to the brand’s independence. Upon creation of the Chandler-Cleveland Corporation, a lower priced Chandler replaced the Cleveland altogether. Originally, it was thought that the Cleveland would compete alongside Chevrolets and Fords, but it turned out to be a much more well-engineered and more reliable machine overall. This Cleveland, offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, represents the brand’s top-of-the-line sedan offered in the 1922 model year. The dual color paint scheme, motorcycle front and rear fenders, step plates, coffin door handles, and one-piece top all accurately echo the company’s motto offering “A real good car.” This car also features foot and robe rails, courtesy shades, and elevated rear seating which allows passengers to see over the driver’s head. Outlawed in 1928, this Cleveland is equipped with a floor heater that uses bypass exhaust and perforated pipes to generate heat. With a shorter wheelbase and lighter coachwork styling, this car is powered by the same overhead valve inline six-cylinder motor as the larger Chandlers, giving it plenty of power and the ability to really get up and go. Originally selling new for just under $1,300, this was a reliable, track proven car that demonstrated its competitiveness with the major brands and, with just around 25,000 original miles on the odometer and after a mechanical freshening, there is still much driving to be done in this Cleveland Model 41.

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1923 Stephens 6-20 Seven-Passenger Sedan

Lot # 519      

Thermo-cooled OHV inline six-cylinder engine, 80 HP, three-speed manual transmission with single reverse gear, leaf spring suspension, rear-wheel mechanical drum braking system; wheelbase: 124”
Manufactured in Freeport, Illinois, relatively little is known about the Stephens marque. The company was known to have an excellent reputation and very small production numbers. Manufacture of their Salient Six automobile was, in fact, so limited that fewer than 20 are known to be in existence today. Featuring such refinements as cut velour upholstery, silver trim, and a natural walnut instrumentation panel, the Salient Sixes were marketed to a middle-class clientele at prices ranging from $1,295 to $2,385 for a top-of-the-line model. Standard features on these cars also included a trunk, power-driven tire pump, transmission lock, cowl ventilator, sun visors, and even a dome light. Advertised as an excellent car for traveling on and off roads, the Stephens offered both the range and speed of a fine touring car for spring and summer driving. Interior features were just as intricately designed, with small coil springs making up the backs and cushions of the broad, low set seats. The six-cylinder motor, built by Stephens, was notably responsive, economical, and easy to upkeep. Mechanically, Stephens outsourced several different parts, but always opted for high quality, easily recognizable brands. Advertising for the car was keen to highlight the incorporation of components including a Delco ignition, Timken axles, a Gemmer steering gear, Mathers springs, and a Fedders radiator. This 1923 Stephens Seven-Passenger Sedan offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is believed to be 1 of just 16 surviving examples today. This model also includes additional options such as a stop light, dash-mount heat indication meter, windshield wiper, and speedometer. The Salient Six’s overhead-valve engine, featuring a Stromberg 1¼-inch carburetor, was well-known for being equal parts responsive and powerful. Having twice won the Los Angeles to Yosemite economy run, the Salient Six engine was formidably proven to be the most economical powerplant of its size for the day. Uniquely built by the Moline Plow Company’s Stephen’s Motor Works, these cars were certainly a one-of-a-kind. With a restoration, fresh paintjob, and tune up, this Stephens Seven-Passenger Sedan, with its handbuilt coachwork, will be ready to intrigue curious onlookers for many years to come.

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1927 Essex Super 6 Pickup

Lot # 517      

153 cid L-head inline six-cylinder engine, 55 HP, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle, semi-floating rear axle, and four-wheel mechanical brakes; wheelbase: 110.5”
During the period between the First World War and the Great Depression, it was very common for automakers to introduce entry level brands. These “junior marques” offered the same quality and attractive design as higher-end models but in smaller, more affordable packages. Hudson’s entry level marque was called the Essex. Named after the town in England, the Essex was meant to have a classy and tasteful appeal. Operating out of one of the old Studebaker plants in Detroit, Essex manufactured just 92 cars during their first production year in 1919. Despite the low yield, the 55 horsepower four-cylinder Essex performed extremely well during tests at the Cincinnati Speedway, completing a continuous nonstop run of 3,037 miles in just 50 hours for an average speed of 60.75 miles per hour. In 1922, the Essex set yet another record by offering a four-passenger coach at a price of just $1,495, making it the cheapest domestically built closed car. After the 1925 production year, the four-cylinder was dropped and the Essex Four became the Essex Six. In 1927, Essex moved a lot closer to Hudson in terms of both style and name. A standout amongst American automobiles, the Essex Six of 1927 was much more Hudson-like than its predecessors; it was punctuated by a sculpted look with a more rounded hood-line and radiator. These design alterations are quite beautifully displayed on this ¾-ton “Factory Special” Essex Super Six truck. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection, it is the only one ever built. The truck is powered by the Essex Six engine which received a longer, 4.5-inch stroke that increased its displacement from 144 to 153 cubic-inches. Though no horsepower rating was released, the power of the Essex Six had certainly increased greatly. By the time the fog of the Depression was lifting, the Essex brand was being phased out, and in 1933 it officially was dropped, assuming the Terraplane nameplate. Though the Speedabouts and Boattail Speedsters received much of the attention for the Essex lineup of the late 1920s, this Super Six Truck is bound to receive all the love. This offer represents a unique opportunity for any truck enthusiast who wants to own a rare and stylish one-off example of early pickup history. This may be the only chance to own one of the most stylish pickup trucks of the era.

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1929 Studebaker GE Six Dictator Rumble Seat Coupe

Lot # 511      

242 cid inline six-cylinder engine, 68 HP, three-speed manual transmission with single reverse gear, floor mount shifting controls, semi-floating rear axle; wheelbase: 113" The Studebaker Brothers of South Bend, Indiana started off by producing wagons for farmers, miners, and the military. In 1911, Studebaker entered the automotive business as its own independent mark. In 1913, Studebaker offered its first six-cylinder car, the E Series. By 1920, Studebaker had gone all sixes, with the Light Six" as their entry level model. In 1927, after renaming their marques several times, Studebaker decided to rename their entry level model the "Dictator" While this may not seem like a very wise decision, the word dictator in the 1920s, did not carry the negative connotations that it does in contemporary times. The name was intended to imply that the model "dictated the standard" that all other automobile companies would follow. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this charming 1929 Studebaker Dictator Rumble Seat Coupe. Interestingly, production of the 1929 Model GE Dictator had already ended by the time the other Studebakers were being introduced in January of that year. As was standard practice, the cars that had already been built to 1928 ½ specifications continued to be marketed if the inventory was still there. Standard equipment on the Dictator included a Steward Warner speedometer, gasoline gauge, engine thermometer, and coincidental lock. Additionally, all Dictators featured a rearview mirror, Trico vacuum-powered windshield wipers, stop and taillight, Lovejoy shock absorbers, and a tire lock. This Studebaker also comes with a rear-mounted spare, which was an added option. Studebaker always emphasized greatly on operability and driver comfort, and even if the Dictator was an entry level trim package, it certainly didn't show it. Dependability and performance ultimately set Studebaker apart from other automotive manufacturers. The following year, 1930, would be the last time that the Dictator would be available with a six-cylinder powerplant. This beautiful cme colored Dictator graciously reflects Studebaker's commitment to providing a quality product from the bottom up. This fun, rumble seat coupe would make a terrific addition to any collectors' display or, after a mechanical freshening, just for some good old driving pleasure.
242 cid inline six-cylinder engine, 68 HP, three-speed manual transmission with single reverse gear, floor mount shifting controls, semi-floating rear axle; wheelbase: 11...more3" The Studebaker Brothers of South Bend, Indiana started off by producing wagons for farmers, miners, and the military. In 1911, Studebaker entered the automotive business as its own independent mark. In 1913, Studebaker offered its first six-cylinder car, the E Series. By 1920, Studebaker had gone all sixes, with the Light Six" as their entry level model. In 1927, after renaming their marques several times, Studebaker decided to rename their entry level model the "Dictator" While this may not seem like a very wise decision, the word dictator in the 1920s, did not carry the negative connotations that it does in contemporary times. The name was intended to imply that the model "dictated the standard" that all other automobile companies would follow. Offered from The Roaring Twenties Museum Collection is this charming 1929 Studebaker Dictator Rumble Seat Coupe. Interestingly, production of the 1929 Model GE Dictator had already ended by the time the other Studebakers were being introduced in January of that year. As was standard practice, the cars that had already been built to 1928 ½ specifications continued to be marketed if the inventory was still there. Standard equipment on the Dictator included a Steward Warner speedometer, gasoline gauge, engine thermometer, and coincidental lock. Additionally, all Dictators featured a rearview mirror, Trico vacuum-powered windshield wipers, stop and taillight, Lovejoy shock absorbers, and a tire lock. This Studebaker also comes with a rear-mounted spare, which was an added option. Studebaker always emphasized greatly on operability and driver comfort, and even if the Dictator was an entry level trim package, it certainly didn't show it. Dependability and performance ultimately set Studebaker apart from other automotive manufacturers. The following year, 1930, would be the last time that the Dictator would be available with a six-cylinder powerplant. This beautiful cme colored Dictator graciously reflects Studebaker's commitment to providing a quality product from the bottom up. This fun, rumble seat coupe would make a terrific addition to any collectors' display or, after a mechanical freshening, just for some good old driving pleasure.

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