Worldwide Auctioneers Scottsdale 2020

Worldwide Auctioneers Scottsdale 2020

Wednesday, January 15, 2020  |  5:00 PM Mountain
Auction closed.
Worldwide Auctioneers Scottsdale 2020

Worldwide Auctioneers Scottsdale 2020

Wednesday, January 15, 2020  |  5:00 PM Mountain
Auction closed.
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Worldwide Auctioneers Scottsdale 2020 World Class Collector Car Auction.
Live Auction Location:
Singh Meadows
1490 E. Weber Drive
Tempe, AZ 85281
Wednesday, January 15th, 5 p.m. Mountain Standard Time, Bid live here online via Proxibid.

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1974 Vespa 90

Lot # 1 (Sale Order: 1 of 21)      

88.5cc single-cylinder air-cooled two-stroke engine, 3.1 HP at 5,200 rpm, single Dell’Orto 16mm carburetor, three-speed grip-shift transmission, 10” pressed steel wheels; wheelbase: 1160 mm
The “small frame” Vespa was one of the last of the Vespa designs to be penned by Corradano D'Ascanio, the designer of the first Vespa. Nevertheless, it was totally different than all the Vespas that had come before. All the small frames shared a common basic body. It was a simplified and streamlined version of the larger Vespa. The simplified design had far fewer parts, was elegant and was almost astounding in its simplicity. The frame was essentially one unit and, although a small door on the right side of the scooter allowed limited engine access, there were no removable cowlings as on previous Vespas. As befitting its status as an economy model, there were no adornments on the scooter, such as aluminum trim or chrome accents. In scale with the frame, the front fender was simplified and made smaller. The floor had only two floor runners on each side, rather than the three that the large frame models had. They are light, very stable, super maneuverable and fun! Introduced at the Milan Show in 1963 and destined mainly for export markets, the Vespa 90 was virtually identical to the 50-cc version. The details that distinguished it were the 10” diameter wheels and the more powerful electrical system with a main-beam headlight and brake light. The leg-shield was fitted with aluminum edge trim, the front suspension had the dual-action damper and the script on the leg-shield was in first made in dark blue but updated through the years. The 90 was successful and remained in production with minimal changes until 1984. This 1974 Vespa 90 is unrestored and exceptionally clean and is believed to have just 101 miles from new. The original factory tool kit is still with this remarkably original Vespa. The current owner reports it runs and drives well and is ready to enjoy “La Dolce Vita”....more

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1975 Norton 850 Commando

Lot # 2 (Sale Order: 2 of 21)      

828cc air-cooled OHV parallel-twin motor, 58 HP, four-speed chain-driven manual transmission, 2.6-gallon fuel tank, front and rear brakes; wheelbase: 56”
Produced by Norton-Villiers, the Norton Commando was one of the most popular motorbikes of the era. In the United Kingdom alone, the Commando won the Motorcycle News “Machine of the Year” award for five consecutive years from 1968 to 1972. The success of the Commando came largely as a surprise to Norton’s engineers. Interestingly, it's hemi-type head, like all OHV Norton engines, was a pre-unit design from the 1940s. One component that was all new on the Commando was the revolutionary Isolastic frame. This frame was developed by former Rolls-Royce engineer Dr. Stefan Bauer, who believed that Norton’s traditional Featherbed frame went against engineering principles. This new design connected the engine, gearbox, and swing-arm assembly together. It then used specialized rubber mountings to isolate these components from the tubular frame causing a great reduction in the vibration problems that plagued classic twin vibration problems. The 850cc Commando, launched in 1975, was highly successful upon import to the United States. By now, the range of Commando models had been reduced to just two machines, the ' Mk.3 Interstate' and the 'Roadster'. While the Roadster included a more basic setup, the Mk.3 included an electric starter, improved isoelastic absorbers, left side gear change, a right-side foot brake, and a rear disc brake. While an updated model, the Norton 76, was planned for the following year, it never came to fruition because the British Industry Minister refused the renew Norton’s export credits. The 850 Commando Mk.3 offered today was purchased from its original owner in 1993 and used as “office art” at the new owner’s Corvette dealership in Texas. It is in completely original condition with only 1,801 miles on it; amazingly its present owner has never ridden it! A true survivor, no restoration work has ever been performed, down to the original Dunlop tires and unused toolkit. Also included in the sale are the original Bill of Sale, Service Vouchers, Assembly Instructions, Dealer Card and Owner’s Manual. With additional attributes including stainless-steel rotors, aluminum fenders and calipers, it would be very difficult to find a nicer example of this motorbike....more

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2004 Mercedes-Benz SL600 Roadster

Lot # 3 (Sale Order: 3 of 21)      

336 cid twin-turbocharged and intercooled SOHC 36-valve V-12 engine, 493 HP at 5,000 RPM, aluminum block and heads, Bosch engine-control system with port fuel injection, five-speed automatic gearbox with lockup torque converter, four-wheel independent suspension, four-wheel disc-brakes; wheelbase: 100.8”
In July 2001, after over five years of development, the all-new SL series was introduced by Mercedes-Benz at the 2001 Frankfurt Motor Show that September. Production began in October of 2001 at the Bremen plant and European sales began that November. The fifth generation SL (or R123 series) remained in production between 2001 and 2008, retailing for more than $130,000 when new. The all-new SL600 (initially just a 5.0-litre SL500 version) featured a sophisticated retractable hardtop, marketed as the Vario Roof. The powerful V-12 engines were available in the top-of-line SL600 and the limited-production SL 65 AMG. The SL600 also features the ABC (active body control) which monitored and adjusted the car’s remarkable balance of comfort and handling. This innovative system uses accumulators and hydraulic fluids to regulate the firmness and heights of the suspension. The SL600 is impressive even by today’s standards: A V-12 twin-turbocharged engine with 493 horsepower and 590 foot-pounds of torque, launches the SL600 from zero to 60 miles per hour in 4.5 seconds, yet at 80 mph it's barely breathing, only churning at 2,500 rpm. Unlike other cars that can accelerate this quickly, the Benz is true to its heritage. Smooth power is this car's expertise, and it is manifested through luxurious packaging, an unbeatable reputation and excellent engineering. Another distinguishing factor of the SL is how seriously Mercedes incorporates safety features. There's a brace of six airbags but, even better, the SL600 gets standard traction and stability control. Active suspension also aids handling by cutting squat and dive during braking, which can alter the delicate balance of traction in slippery conditions. One of the most pleasurable things about the SL600 is how well Mercedes controls wind noise, even with the collapsible metal and glass top in the retracted position. There is an electrically deployable wind baffle that folds up behind the rear seats at the touch of a dash-mounted button, and when the windows are up you can drive at 75 mph without even adjusting the stereo. Driving with the folding metal roof in the up position is so quiet that you would never even know this car is a convertible--it's that quiet inside. Car and Driver magazine was impressed when they tested a new SL600 in 2004: “Drop the hammer on the 12, and 5.5 litres worth of low-end torque bear the car away with the speed and silence of a trebuchet launch. The turbos spool up mutely and sustain peak torque from 1,800 to 3,600 rpm. Power delivery is absolutely linear and, even with the top down, the turbos can never be heard whistling while they work.” This well-cared for SL600 is finished handsomely with a Dark Graphite body with elegantly coordinating leather interior. Driven less than 48,000 from new, the current long term owner has always pampered this SL600, insisting on using the local authorized Mercedes-Benz dealership for any maintenance or service. Exotic and extremely powerful, yet quiet and effortless to operate, this SL600 offers a uniquely pleasurable way to experience thrilling performance and extreme luxury at the same time....more

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1964 Morgan 4/4

Lot # 4 (Sale Order: 4 of 21)      

1,498cc 116E Ford OHV inline four-cylinder engine, 65 HP, four-speed Moss manual gearbox, sliding-pillar front suspension with coil springs, solid rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf spring suspension, hydraulically-assisted Girling front disc and rear drum brakes; wheelbase: 96”
Ever the traditional builder of handmade sports cars, the Morgan Motor Company defies modern technology and unabashedly continues to build the Morgan 4/4 in an analog spirit. Indeed, the Morgan 4/4 has been produced continuously by the Morgan Motor Company since 1936. Apart from a mandatory shutdown during World War II, and the period of March 1951 to September 1955, the 4/4 has been in continuous production from its debut right up to the present day. It was Morgan's first car with four wheels, the name indicating that the model has four wheels and four cylinders. Earlier Morgan cars had been three-wheelers, typically with V-twin engines. Remarkably, a brand-new Morgan 4/4 looks recognizably the same as the 1936 original. The ever-lengthy waiting list for a new 4/4 is a testament to the enduring popularity it has enjoyed over the decades and has not faded. The 4/4 presented here is a Series V, introduced in February 1963. The Series V features a 1,498cc version of the inline four-cylinder engine found in the Ford Cortina mated to a four-speed manual gearbox with Girling front disc brakes and rear drum brakes. A total of 639 Series V cars were produced before production ceased in March of 1968. This handsome Morgan 4/4 is believed by the consignor to have less than 20,000 miles since new and drives like a low-mileage car should. It appears to have been repainted at some point and presents well, however the interior is still the original, showing its age with a charming patina. All gauges, lights and the heater are all reported to be in working order, making this classic Morgan a pleasure to operate. Accompanying the car are the side curtains, folding top and tonneau cover. Full of old-world charm and character, this traditional Morgan 4/4 is simply a delight to look at and drive....more

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1969 Chevrolet Camaro RS/SS Indy 500 Pace Car Convertible

Lot # 5 (Sale Order: 5 of 21)      

350 cid OHV V-8 engine, 300 HP, three-speed Turbo-Hydramatic automatic transmission, coil spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and front disc and rear drum brakes; wheelbase: 108”
First introduced in 1967, the Camaro was Chevrolet’s answer to the wildly successful Ford Mustang. Based on the same long hood, short deck style of the Mustang, the two nearly matched each other feature-for-feature and option-to-option. Like the Mustang, which owed its origins to the compact Falcon, the Camaro had its roots in the compact Chevy II Nova. Chevrolet built 3,675 pace car replicas, RPO code Z11, to commemorate the second time the Camaro had paced the Indianapolis 500 in the three years since its introduction. Jim Rathman, the 1960 Indy winner, was chosen to pilot the pace car on race day. The 1969 models featured sharp new styling, including new grille, taillights, creases above the wheel openings, rectangular parking lights, bolder exterior stripes...and for the pace car convertibles, all painted Dover White and Hugger Orange with an equally striking orange and black houndstooth interior. It gave the car a most distinctive look not shared with anything else. When buyers chose RPO Code Z11, “Indy 500 Pace Car Accents,” certain options became mandatory, including D80 Spoiler Equipment, Z22 Rally Sport Package, and ZL2 Air Induction Hood. At $79, the extra-cost hood was developed from racing, which had shown Chevrolet engineers that the high-pressure area at the base of the windshield was an ideal place to feed cool air into the air cleaner and thus enhance performance. Standard was an L48 300-horsepower, 350 cubic-inch V-8, and roughly 80 percent of all cars, like this example, were equipped with the 350/300 V-8. This highly documented and accurate Pace Car was owned by the original lady-owner from 1969-1985. She worked at a lumber company in central Illinois and simply drove it to and from work. She would park it and not drive it in the winter months. It would soon find itself purchased by noted restorer Don Hanley, who performed the comprehensive restoration that has been judged many times since and stands up well. Awards include AACA, Grand National 390/400, Vintage Chevrolet: Best of Show, Triple Award Winner-Vince Pickering Award twice (995/1000). This example is documented and truly numbers matching, with casting dates within two weeks of the build date. There are absolutely no body repairs evident, and the fit and finish remain exceptional, including immaculate paint and excellent chrome and trim. This genuine RS/SS Indy Pace Car convertible is 1 of just 3,675 produced. It is finished in its original colors of Dover White with Hugger Orange striping and white top and is optioned with an original 272 correct-dated L34 396/350HP big-block engine backed to a Turbo-Hydramatic three-speed transmission and 12-bolt rear. This pace car is additionally equipped with convenience options, such as power disc brakes, center console, tachometer with special instrumentation gauges in console, Rallye wheels, deluxe custom houndstooth interior, front and rear spoilers, cowl-induction hood and, of course, the Z11 Indy 500 package. It has had an excellent restoration with great attention to detail using correct-style hoses, clamps and tires. The Morgans had been on the hunt for a good example for some time, and with good reason. Mrs. Morgan had been a Princess in the Queen's Court in the 1969 Indy 500 in a '69 Pace Car Convertible. The condition, history and awards were the perfect fit and the car has been cherished and cared for since their acquisition in 2012. This limited-edition Indy 500 Pace Car has benefitted from thoughtful ownership and presents in excellent overall condition throughout. An excellent driving example for any tour or Concours events, this ’69 Camaro convertible is one of the most desirable built and will undoubtedly deliver plenty of performance and excitement for its next owners. Buy the best here in Scottsdale, and you’ll own a Camaro that is ideal for touring, club events, and any car show, and will certainly be a highlight of a Chevrolet collection....more

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1957 Ford Thunderbird Roadster

Lot # 6 (Sale Order: 6 of 21)      

312 cid OHV V-8 engine, 245 HP, two-speed Ford-O-Matic automatic transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live axle rear suspension with leaf springs, four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase: 102”
Produced as a countermeasure to Chevrolet's Corvette sports car, the now well-known and iconic Thunderbird debuted in October of 1954. Just like the Corvette, it was used as a platform to pioneer upcoming technology and the first models were produced with Ford's new overhead-valve V-8 engine. The Thunderbird was presented as sporty two-seater that was intended to appeal to younger customers who were conscious of their cool and hip image. It also gained the upper hand in the sales war with Chevy thanks to a superiorly designed V-8 engine and greater assembly refinement. With the widespread sales success, it was understandable that very few alterations were made for the 1956 model year, with the most obvious being the rearrangement of the spare wheel positioning from the inside to the outside of the trunk in the style of what was called the Continental Kit. Engine options also changed to include a beefier 312 cubic-inch, 215-horsepower Thunderbird Special V-8. The Thunderbird underwent a much more significant re-style for 1957 which included the adoption of a lengthier tail section and much more prominent tailfins. As well as giving the car a sleeker appearance, this alteration also served a practical purpose by providing greater luggage space, something which two-seater sportsters were known for lacking. This size adjustment also allowed enough room for the spare wheel to be relocated back into the trunk, a move that resulted in slight improvements in the car’s overall handling. The front end of the car was also given a very mild facelift which further complemented the car’s sharp, creased edges. The interior of the ‘57 saw the introduction of a new instrument panel which was marketed as the “Lifeguard Design,” named so for its padded dashboard and inset steering wheel which were all seen as safety adaptations. At this point, there were six engine options that could be paired with each trim level, alongside numerous power refinements and high-profile wide whitewall tires. Some other engineering changes included the addition of another leaf to the rear springs, 14-inch wheels, and larger front brakes which greatly improved stopping power. This Thunderbird, offered in attractive red with both fabric convertible top and hard top, is without a doubt a terrific example of just what made these cars a phenomenon from the start. Equipped with the 312 cubic-inch, 4V, 245-horsepower V-8, power windows, and power brakes, this car makes the perfect Sunday...or any-day driver. It is also among the last of the first generation 1955-'57 Thunderbirds, which have for a long time ranked among the most wanted and sought-after of all post-war American automobiles. As it goes with many of the greatest cars, the original two-seater Thunderbird climaxed during its production year of 1957. During that year, Thunderbirds were flying out of showrooms, with some 21,000 T-Birds sold in 1957. It was even reported that the sheer number of requests for many more of these cars could not be answered by the factory. In a move that seemed contrary to its success, the original Thunderbird two-seater concept soon was abandoned. In 1958, a four-seat version was introduced, almost immediately turning the earlier two-seater cars into collectors' items overnight. Don’t miss this chance to own a well-cared for and highly sought-after collector Thunderbird such as this....more

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1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 454 LS6

Lot # 11 (Sale Order: 7 of 21)      

454 cid OHV LS6 V-8 engine with a Holley four-barrel carburetor, 450 HP, TH400 automatic transmission, independent front suspension with A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with trailing arms and coil springs, front-wheel disc and rear-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase: 112”
The Chevelle, first introduced in 1964, was Chevrolet’s version of the corporate A-body at General Motors. The horsepower available in the SS model steadily increased through the 1960s, culminating in 1970 with the LS6 Turbo-Jet 454 V-8 option that is featured on this car, never to be eclipsed in subsequent years. The big block motor produced an advertised 450 horsepower at 5,600 rpm and 500 foot-pounds of torque at 3,600 rpm, which were the highest performance numbers of the muscle car era. Keep in mind this was a factory option that anybody could walk in and order from your friendly Chevrolet dealer for just an extra $263.30 on the window sticker. Some 4,475 buyers made that choice and were rewarded with higher insurance premiums to go along with the high performance. In fact, the car was rumored to produce 500 horsepower, but the factory claimed 450 in the interest of lower insurance costs. Hot Rod magazine tested an LS6 at the time and reported a blistering 13.44-second-quarter mile at a speed of 108 mph, utilizing 8.4 mpg of premium fuel. The tester noted the biggest problem was trying to get the tires to hook up, as any stab of the throttle caused them to go up in smoke and slide sideways as a result. This exceptional example of Chevrolet’s ultimate expression of the muscle car was built at the Baltimore assembly plant and shipped on February 12, 1970, to Dean Myers Chevrolet-Oldsmobile in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is 1 of only 231 of these cars imported for sale in Canada, according to documents that accompany the car. It is factory equipped with the highly desirable Z15 SS Package featuring the monstrous LS6 454 cubic-inch, 450 HP “Big-Block” V-8 engine, F41 special suspension, Goodyear Polyglas F70-14 tires on five-spoke SS wheels and SS badging. The list of factory options ordered new on this Chevelle SS includes a TH400 automatic transmission, 4:10 ratio Positraction differential, bucket seats, center console, tinted glass, power steering and power front disc brakes, pushbutton AM radio and a heavy-duty battery. Treated to a comprehensive frame-off restoration starting with a walnut-blasting of the body and frame down to bare metal, the restoration utilized NOS parts wherever possible. The sheet metal was replaced as necessary and the completed body was sprayed in original-code Cortez Silver base/clear coat with black stripes. The correct LS6 454/450 HP V-8 engine, transmission and rear axle housing were rebuilt and properly detailed. Attention to detail is present in such items as the correct Holley four-barrel carburetor, deep-groove pulleys, emission controls, cooling-system components and spiral shock absorbers, all the right numbers and date codes, as well as careful placement of all the correct factory labels and markings. This Chevelle checks many boxes: the one-year-only powerful LS6 engine, an attractive color combination, documentation, a superb restoration, proper care and perhaps most important of all, the most powerful Chevrolet muscle car ever produced....more

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1971 De Tomaso Pantera

Lot # 13 (Sale Order: 8 of 21)      

351 cid OHV V-8 engine, single downdraft four-barrel Holley carburetor, 285 HP at 5,400 RPM, five-speed manual ZF transaxle, four-wheel power-assisted disc brakes, front and rear independent suspension with coil springs; wheelbase: 98.4”
De Tomaso's first road-going production model was the Vallelunga (named after the racing circuit) introduced in 1963. This mid-engine sports car had a 104 horsepower, shared with the Ford Cortina, and featured an aluminum backbone chassis, which was to become a common feature of De Tomaso cars. The first five cars were produced in aluminum bodywork while production cars had fiberglass bodywork. In 1966, the sensational Mangusta was introduced, becoming the first De Tomaso produced in significant numbers. With the Mangusta, De Tomaso switched from European to American Ford engines. The car was powered by a 4.7-litre iron-block V-8 engine and steel and aluminum coupé with coachwork by Ghia, an Italian coachbuilder also controlled by Alejandro de Tomaso. About 400 Mangustas were produced before production ceased in 1971. For the Pantera, introduced in 1971, De Tomaso commissioned Lamborghini designer Gianpaolo Dallara to create the chassis for his new mid-engine supercar, the Pantera. Dallara selected unitary construction for the steel chassis and body, abandoning the Mangusta's backbone frame. The distinctive wedge-shaped body was styled by Ghia's brilliant Tom Tjaarda at Carrozzeria Ghia. The stunning coupe’s body was in fact built by Vignale, both companies being part of De Tomaso's empire in the early 1970s. Ford Motor Company was De Tomaso's partner at the time of the Pantera's introduction and thus the Pantera, like the Mangusta, utilized Ford’s V-8. This 351 cubic-inch Ford ‘Cleveland’ engine featured deep-breathing heads patterned after the very successful Boss 302 design, four-barrel carburetion and four-bolt main bearing caps. The new V-8 was mated to a ZF fully synchronized five-speed transaxle with limited slip, and rated at 310 horsepower (SAE Gross, 1971 trim). A longstanding relationship with the Ford Motor Company led to an arrangement whereby the Pantera was distributed through select Lincoln-Mercury dealerships in the USA. The 1974 energy crisis led to a parting of the ways between Ford and De Tomaso, who continued to sell the Pantera in Europe. Exceptionally long-lived for a supercar, the Pantera was still around in the 1990s having undergone a series of upgrades. The first of these had appeared on the 'L' model in late 1972, which featured black 'impact resistant' bumpers and improved cooling and air-conditioning systems. Flared wheel arches distinguished the GTS model of 1974, which in European trim came with a 350 HP engine, larger wheels/tires and other performance enhancements. Production of the world’s longest-running supercar finally ceased in 1993. This 1971 Pantera is an early example and features the highly desirable chrome bumpers, 1 of only 743 Pre-L model cars built for the 1971 model year. Additionally, the 1971 model year had the highest HP rating of the four model years imported by Ford (1970 had 300 HP). With a Ford V-8 and the same ZF transmission as the GT40, it was considered by Ford to be the road-going version of the extremely rare GT40. In eye catching condition inside and out, mechanically sound with an upgraded cooling system and a new air-conditioning system installed by PMI, this rare Pantera runs and drives smoothly with excellent performance and handling characteristics. The body is finished attractively in yellow, and the unmodified interior features De Tomaso floor mats and original Veglia gauges. Panteras have been coveted by enthusiasts for decades, resulting in many of them being heavily modified for increased performance and track use, making an un-altered original such as this a rarity. This early Pantera presents well and is perfect for touring, rallies and club events. With their clean, sharp lines, and strong powertrains, the Pre-L Panteras are considered the most desirable of the series....more

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1961 Austin-Healey 3000

Lot # 14 (Sale Order: 9 of 21)      

2,912cc inline six-cylinder engine, 124 HP, dual SU carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox with overdrive, independent front suspension with coil springs, rigid rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, Girling front disc and rear hydraulic drum brakes; wheelbase: 92”
Debuting at the New York Motor Show in March 1959, the Austin-Healey 3000 retained the sleek good looks of its 100/6 predecessor while providing an appreciated increase in performance, thanks to a larger-capacity version of the long-established C-Series engine. Over-bored to 2,912cc, newly improved engine produced 124 horsepower, making it capable of a top speed of 114 mph with the optional hardtop installed. Otherwise, the car was much as before, though Girling front disc brakes were a welcome improvement. The resulting, highly developed Austin-Healey 3000 was an immediate success, both on and off the track. In 1960, the second production year for the six-cylinder Austin-Healeys, the company achieved great success on the competitive international rally scene, with Pat Moss and Ann Wisdom victorious at the Liege-Rome-Liege, Coupes des Dames in Geneva and the Tulip Rally. With partial alloy bodies, these cars were light enough to perform exceptionally with the extra power gained from the new 3.0-litre, six-cylinder engine. The stylish Austin-Healey presented here is in excellent condition. The current owner recently conducted a restoration of the interior that is finely trimmed authentically in black leather with correct red seat piping and new carpets. Seat belts were added for safety as well. The “Big Six” engine mated to a three-speed manual gearbox with overdrive is in excellent tune, runs strong and is detailed correctly as is the engine bay with original-style hose clamps, wires, paint finishes and other related items adding to the quality of this well-cared for Austin-Healey. All the electrical components and heater system function well. Accessories include wind wings, driving lamps and front edge bar. A set of original side curtains are included along with the convertible top. Classic sporting British style, a lively six-cylinder engine and fine overall quality make this Austin-Healey an ideal choice for fun automotive gatherings and encourages spirited open-air driving down country roads....more

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1966 Sunbeam Tiger MKI Roadster

Lot # 17 (Sale Order: 10 of 21)      

260 cid Ford OHV V-8 engine, 164 HP, four-speed manual transmission, wishbone front suspension with coil springs and anti-roll bars, solid rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and servo-assisted Girling front disc and rear drum brakes; wheelbase: 86”
There is no doubt among enthusiasts that the Shelby Cobra has gone down in the history books as a prime example Ford’s power at its best. In 1964, that same V-8 powerplant was slipped into a lightweight British roadster, and thus the Sunbeam Tiger was born. At the time, British automaker Sunbeam was producing a delightfully designed slab-sided roadster that offered significantly more comfort that other British sportscars of the era. The Alpine, as it was known, was quite stylish but it lacked the performance to match its sleek, attractive look. Fitting these Alpine roadsters with a small block Ford V-8, a four-speed transmission, rack-and-pinion steering, and stiffened springs resulted in a transformation from mundane to extraordinary. With a 0 to 60 mph performance in 7.8 seconds and a top speed of 124 mph, these cars produced figures that no sporting professional would ever think to complain about. Just like the Shelby Cobra, the Sunbeam Tiger lived up to its name even when being test driven by GT40 racer Ken Miles. Between 1964 and 1967, just a few more than 5,000 Tigers were produced. At that point, Chrysler purchased Sunbeam’s parent company, finding themselves in the awkward position of offering a Ford-powered model. Since there were no Chrysler engines that would fit in the car, a Mopar Tiger was unfortunately not to be and as a result, the Tiger was discontinued. The Tiger MKI shown here is notable as an early model, with minimal trim and featured a single chrome body strip. Painted in beautiful dark blue with black interior, its level of detail is impressive. It is equipped with the original 260 cubic-inch engine with upgrades including Petronix ignition, a four-barrel, LAT alloy Tiger valve covers, a larger aluminum radiator, a longer more ergonomic Mustang shifter handle and hi-flow water pump. Other new and rebuilt items include the convertible top, brake booster, master cylinder, clutch cylinder, slave cylinder, shocks, rack and pinion, and the exhaust system. It is a former California car equipped with the attractive and seldom seen Shelby American alloy wheels. The trunk is clean, and still contains its original spare wheel and jack. Often referred to as 'The Baby Cobra', the Sunbeam Tiger is a true performance car that is enjoyable to own and drive on a daily basis....more

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1967 Buick Gran Sport 400 Convertible

Lot # 23 (Sale Order: 11 of 21)      

400 cid V-8 engine, 340 HP at 440 ft-lbs torque, single carburetor, TH400 automatic transmission, four-wheel power-assisted drum brakes, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with coil springs; wheelbase: 115”
Reacting to the runaway success of the Pontiac GTO in 1964, Buick introduced the Skylark Gran Sport for the 1965 model year, following the same formula so successfully employed by Pontiac of inserting a large displacement engine into an intermediate size car. Buick engineers fitted the 401 cubic-inch “Nailhead” engine, normally used in full-sized Buicks, and the Gran Sport was born. In 1967, Buick retired the venerable Nailhead engine that had been used since 1953, introducing a completely new and modern line of engines. The new 400 cubic-inch Gran Sport engine had bigger manifold branches, larger valves, and improved exhaust headers that assured minimum gas flow restriction. Intake valves were 18 percent larger than in 1966 and the exhaust valves were 56 percent larger. Other innovations included water jackets in the cylinder heads that were carried around the spark plug holes. In addition, conical spark plug seats eliminated the need for plug washers. The 400 was rated at 340 horsepower with an impressive 440 foot-pounds of torque. Topping off the new engine was an elaborately-styled, futuristic air cleaner unique to the GS 400. In recent years, Buick aficionados affectionally refer to it as the “Star Wars” air cleaner. Compared to its 1965 Gran Sport test car, Car Life found that the 1967 GS-400 faster to 60 mph (6.6 seconds) and in the quarter mile (14.7 seconds). But there were more changes than in the engine department alone. For one, the Gran Sport wasn't a Skylark any more. As Popular Mechanics put it, "Probably feeling the 'Skylark' tag might be too much for the birds, Buick folks 'officially divorced' what is now the GS-400 from the Skylark series. They're probably right -- a ruddy young male would much prefer a masculine GS-400 to a fine-feathered bird." Instead of fender skirts, which were standard on the Skylark, the GS had open rear wheel housings that showed off its F70 x 14 wide-oval red- or white-stripe tires. General styling was left intact, but the grille adopted a thicker horizontal bar bisected by a strong vertical spine accented in red. Taillights were enlarged a bit as well. This rare 1967 GS Convertible has been treated to a complete, frame-off restoration starting with a dry, rust-free Montana car. Restoration included a rebuilding of the 400 cubic-inch engine and TH400 automatic transmission, as well as a rebuilding of the suspension system, including, A-arm bushings, shocks absorbers, springs, tie rod ends and ball joints. Additionally, new brakes, brake lines, fuel lines, fuel pump and carburetor, radiator, driveshaft, U-Joints and power top lines, plus a new set of BF Goodrich radial TA tires were installed to ensure this Gran Sport runs and drives as well as it looks. The rare and highly prized “Star Wars” air cleaner finishes off the detailed engine bay. Options featured on this Buick muscle car include a factory power convertible top, tilt steering column, bucket seats with power driver’s seat, consolette, power steering and brakes and Buick Road Wheels. Seldom seen and sought-after by collectors, this 1967 Buick Gran Sport presents a rare chance to acquire a very special car....more

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1965 Chevrolet C10 Fleetside Pickup

Lot # 24 (Sale Order: 12 of 21)      

6.0-liter V-8 engine, 400 HP, 480LE automatic transmission, independent coil spring front suspension, rear semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel power disc brakes; wheelbase: 115”
Launched in the fall of 1959, the 1960 model year introduced a new body style of Chevrolet’s light pickup truck that featured many firsts. Most important of these were a drop-center ladder frame, allowing the cab to sit lower, and independent front suspension, featuring a torsion bar design, giving an almost car-like ride in a truck. By 1963, a new coil-spring front suspension was introduced and, in 1964, the cab was modified with a flat windscreen and a new front grille. One of the most popular models was the C10 Stepside, also known as “Fenderside”, which was part of the trend for more driver-friendly everyday trucks. This 1965 model has been tastefully been upgraded for modern comfort and performance. Flip open the forward-opening hood on most ’65 C10s, and you’ll see the classic straight six. Pop this hood, and a modern 6.0-liter Vortec V-8 engine fills the engine bay. It produces 400 HP and, with a 480LE automatic transmission, this beauty is fully capable of keeping up with any modern highway traffic. Four-wheel power disc brakes all around ensure safe stopping, and with power steering, the consignor reports that this is a very easy driving truck. This all-new drivetrain is fresh and powerful, making this truck an ideal candidate for touring, show use, or even daily driving. The all-metal body has been beautifully prepared and painted in turquoise and white, with all new chrome throughout and the desirable large rear window. The panel fit and finish is excellent, the new oak bed looks great, and the overall impression from top to bottom is a beautifully restored custom short-bed truck with tasteful upgrades and custom wheels that has obviously been professionally assembled. Inside, the roomy cab is beautifully done, with an all new digital dash, clean door panels, and a beautiful leather interior. There is simply nothing for the new owner to do but turn the key and enjoy all of the performance this classic Chevrolet truck has to offer. With classic trucks as strong in the market as they have been for a while, anyone can bid and enjoy this beautiful truck that rates as Chevrolet’s most successful of the entire generation....more

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1947 Chrysler Town & Country Convertible

Lot # 26 (Sale Order: 13 of 21)      

323.5 cid inline eight-cylinder engine rated at 135 HP, four-speed Chrysler Fluid Drive semi-automatic transmission, independent coil-spring front suspension, solid axle rear suspension with hydraulic shocks and leaf springs, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes; wheelbase: 121.5”
The beauty of real wood has always had a place in the automotive world. Whether on the dashboard of an exotic Packard town car or on the skiff body of a coachbuilt Rolls-Royce, the various patterns and grains of real wood always adds a certain charm to a motorcar that brings it to a different level. When Chrysler offered their line of Town & Country cars during the 1940s, they were as glamorous as any Cadillac or Packard of the day. Except during a brief hiatus during World War II, the beauty of real wood was the main feature of these elegant cars, a fact not lost on many affluent members of society. Television star Jackie Gleason was known to drive an elegant Town & Country, which didn’t harm the image of Chrysler’s superstar of cars. Offered here is a wonderful example of this most iconic car finished in Catalina Tan with a burgundy convertible top all brought together in a symphony of sophistication with real Mahogany and Birch wood. The beauty of Chrysler’s elegant design starts at the front with a massive bumper in front of an egg-crate styled grille that’s flanked by the head lamps on top and turn signals at the sides. This Town & Country is equipped with optional yellow glass fog lamps and twin search lights that add a nice touch. Chrysler’s postwar styling of sweeping the front fenders into the doors made for a streamlined look that was showing the way into the future. This design cue would be used on all of Chrysler’s products except Plymouth. At the rear a gorgeous sea of Mahogany and Birch is nicely finished with a high-gloss shine. Large tail lamps and a huge center mounted stop light features lenses made of real glass. The Town & Country name is also embossed in the rear bumper. Subtle styling cues such as three trim spears off the front grille and a single trim spear over the rear wheel give it the classic look for which the late 1940s were known. The interior is finished in a two-tone red and tan upholstery that gives it a deep and luxurious look. The two-tone appearance is also carried onto the dashboard where Chrysler’s vertical styled radio and an Art Deco-inspired clock give a stylish look in the center. Driving is easy thanks to Chrysler’s Fluid Drive transmission that allows for shift-free driving. This large car easily fits six passengers and touring on a fine summer day only gets better with the top down. Under the hood is one of the most dependable engines ever built with Chrysler’s inline eight that was smooth and quiet with more than enough power to maintain modern highway speeds. The entire package is nicely pulled together with a set of wide whitewall tires with Chrysler logo hubcaps and beauty rings in chrome. All paint and brightwork present well on this Town & Country and it’s also a car that runs as well as it looks. The use of real wood in the present day is all but gone with the exception of the most exotic and expensive bespoke cars, but this 1947 Chrysler Town & Country Convertible takes us back to a time when real wood was available on a production-based car. Of course, that beauty was not cheap, as the Town & Country was Chrysler’s most expensive car, but what the buyer got was a car that was one of the best on the road. With its gorgeous wood and fine Chrysler engineering, this is a car that is right at home in any enthusiast's garage....more

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1962 Chevrolet Corvette Roadster

Lot # 32 (Sale Order: 14 of 21)      

327 cid V-8 engine, 245 HP, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with upper and lower A-arms, rear semi-elliptic leaf springs, drum brakes; wheelbase: 102”
Even though the 1962 is considered one of the greatest of all C1 Corvettes, the perception that it was “Transitional” was not completely unwarranted. In 1962, Zora Duntov stated that the 1992 Corvette’s new 327 cubic-inch engine would be the last time the Corvette’s power would be increased - in that chassis, anyway. Zora certainly made good on that the public relations promise of “added excitement for those wishing the ultimate in performance.” As the penultimate version of the C1 Corvette, the 1962s offer collectors noticeably more low-end torque while retaining much of the classic styling that began the Corvette’s long run as America’s #1 sports car in 1954. The 1962, Corvettes were offered in solid colors only, as GM was already planning the introduction of the new Sting Ray body style for 1963. The ’62s are easy to spot as the grille is actually blacked out and the chrome trim around the coves was removed, along with the obvious quad headlamps. For the first time since 1957, buyers could order color-coded wheels and full hubcaps featured on this car, and for the first time, seat belts were standard equipment from the factory. The heater/defroster became standard equipment this year, as this car is presented, although they could be deleted to save the weight for owners who were buying the car to race it. The original purchaser also ordered the Wonderbar AM radio and console-mounted clock. While visually correct, the owner reports the radio was replaced with a non-tube version for modern reliability and reception. The consignor of this lovely Corvette has a special connection with the car - as a young man, he was invited to be on a pit crew at the legendary Sebring Raceway, supporting a 1962 Corvette race car. It certainly started a long relationship with “America’s Sportscar”, as he’s owned quite a few since. The car was cosmetically restored less than 2,000 miles ago, with all new chrome and the correct Roman Red paint finish and, today, it shows far better than the day it left Detroit. The panel fit is exceptional, the paint application is stellar, and the tan soft top is just like new for a superb presentation throughout. Top to bottom, this fine 1962 is fully ready for your next road trip or concours event. The original hydraulic lifter engine block, transmission, and rear end were completely restored just a few hundred miles ago and, with a modern version of the Duntov cam and a big four-barrel carburetor, the consignor reports the car has quite a bit more punch than it ever had during its first life. Pop the hood, and it’s clean and pure stock, with all the proper belts, hoses, and fasteners that Corvette enthusiasts will look for. Inside, the new owner will enjoy the fresh new upholstery, excellent clean carpets and brand-new mats inside the comfortable cockpit. It’s a like-new clean California car that has obviously been cherished and cared for by all its owners for a very long time. Visually stock and in immaculate condition, it’s clearly one of the best you’ll find, and the lucky new owner has nothing to do but turn the key and enjoy the accolades he or she is certain to receive everywhere they drive....more

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1960 Chevrolet Impala Convertible

Lot # 38 (Sale Order: 15 of 21)      

283 cid V-8 engine with 230 HP, two-speed Powerglide automatic transmission, coil spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with coil-spring trailing arm suspension, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes; wheelbase: 119”
When the fin wars of the 1950s began to wane, it was anyone’s guess where the design for the U.S. automobile was headed. After all, how could one even think of topping the huge fins and sparkling jewelry that defined the Decade of Innocence? As the 1960s dawned, Detroit entered a time of sophistication that took the American car from pinball game status to a stylish ride that was tasteful and streamlined. Cadillac’s fins were now more subtle, and Ford’s cars were downright docile as the new decade emerged. It would take Chrysler a few more years to catch on, but eventually the jet-inspired cruisers of the 1950s were modernized into the sleek designs of the 1960s. As Chevrolet entered the decade, their cars now carried a more streamlined style with a more discriminating use of chrome to complement its long and low look. The most dazzling car in Chevy’s line-up for 1960 was the gorgeous Impala. The beauty of Chevy’s Impala for 1960 was found at the rear with an attractively styled “gullwing” theme that saw the fin laid over on its side into the body for a smooth and stylish look. It was a natural progression from the fin wars of the 1950s and it gave Chevrolet’s cars a look of sophistication. These dazzling styling cues are eveident on this 1960 Impala Convertible that’s finished in Chevrolet’s attractive Roman Red with a white rear quarter trim spear. This is an original car with just 62,000 miles on it and today presents as an excellent car. This Impala has just emerged from a single 30-year ownership and has had just one repaint some 40 years ago. Chevrolet’s grille up front for 1960 ran the entire lateral length of the car and twin headlamps were all the rage for 1960. Twin aircraft-styled vertical stabilizers rode at the front of the fenders giving just a slight hint that the age of the jet-inspired car was not quite over yet. A panoramic wraparound windshield offered excellent visibility on the open road. All these fine styling cues came together at the rear with the gullwing design and a triple taillight theme that was simple and uncluttered. The interior of this Impala is original to the car and is everything one would expect from a fine boulevard cruiser with jet-like pods housing the gauges and a two-spoke “boomerang” styled steering wheel that’s both sporty and functional. Bucket seats were still a few years away and the front bench seat in this example was the standard of the day when a car easily held six passengers. The upholstery is finished in red and white and it also carries Chevrolet script rubber floor mats. It’s also equipped with a padded dashboard, deluxe heater, and radio. Power for this Impala comes from one of Chevrolet’s best engines ever built in the way of a 283 V-8 with 230 horsepower, which gives it more than enough muscle to maintain modern highway speeds. This Impala rides on wide whitewall tires with deluxe Chevrolet hubcaps for the perfect cruiser look. This is a car that has been superbly maintained to the highest standards and comes with all its books and records. In a time when bigger was better, the 1960 Chevrolet was a car that ruled the road. This Impala has all the right characteristics and it has been driven only 62,000 miles. This is a car that can be driven and enjoyed as well as attending an occasional show. For the very best in a full-size Chevrolet that offers top down fun on a sunny day, this Impala is ready for the open road....more

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1950 Buick Roadmaster Convertible Custom

Lot # 39 (Sale Order: 16 of 21)      

320.2 cid inline eight-cylinder engine rated at 152 HP, two-speed Dynaflow automatic transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live axle rear suspension with coil springs, four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase: 130.25”
The era of the coachbuilt car reached its zenith in the early 1930s. It was then that a chassis could be ordered from companies like Duesenberg, Packard, Marmon, or Rolls-Royce, and then fitted with bespoke bodies from Willoughby, Barker, Darrin, Locke, Dietrich, or Le Baron. This method of building a custom car was all but gone after World War II, but some decades later in the 1970s the long-lost art of coachbuilding was revived by a small company called the Bayliff Coach Corporation of Lima, Ohio. C. Budd Bayliff was an enthusiastic Packard fan who had purchased the Packard name and trademark in 1978. It was here that Bayliff found his calling building “modern” Packards using a General Motors chassis. The cars built by Bayliff ranged from simple cosmetic changes to a complete reworking of the entire body. Bayliff’s output was never large, but it is known that several modern Packards were built on a variety of chassis as well as four hearses and a prototype for a front-wheel-drive Miller-Meteor Eldorado. Although the company’s output was small, Bayliff’s work does represent an interesting chapter in automotive history. Offered here is an eye catching example from Bayliff’s history built on a 1950 Buick Roadmaster chassis. One look is all that is needed to tell there’s something very special about this well-proportioned car as its four-doors are a most unusual sight with the top down. Built by Bayliff in the 1980s, it started life as a Buick Model 72 Roadmaster and Bayliff’s company worked their magic from there by turning it into a four-door convertible. In an interview with Bayliff some years later he revealed that they started with a very low mileage car in excellent condition. Buick’s signature four portholes on the sides of the hood tell the world that this is a top-of-the-line Roadmaster. Finished in a gorgeous Regal Red, this large Buick makes a dramatic statement from any angle. Buick’s grille up front for 1950 could only be described as massive with a waterfall theme featuring nine vertical bars. A large gunsight hood ornament complete with trim spear adorns the ultra-long hood, and an equally large rear bumper set the tone for a glamorous car. Bayliff’s coachwork reveals a meticulous eye for detail as all body seams look factory correct and in excellent alignment. The interior is equally impressive in fine red upholstery and tan carpets with matching tan paintwork on the dashboard that offer a look of bespoke elegance. All trim appointments are nicely polished, and the large white steering wheel carries the Buick crest. The trunk is also nicely finished in fine carpet and even carries a cover for the spare tire. The top is also most intriguing in that it has four-positions. The front is capable of coming off separately to resemble a “town car” with an open driver’s compartment. The rear can also fold away to create the appearance of a traditional Landaulet. Of course, the full top can also be fully raised or lowered out of sight for a clean and uncluttered look. Power comes from Buick’s dependable inline eight-cylinder with more than enough power to cruise at modern highway speeds. The engine compartment is nicely detailed and fully sorted and the present owner reports that it is a pleasure to drive. This big car rides on chrome wire wheels with wide whitewall tires for a look that’s all class. This Buick has received accolades at every show it’s been to. The era of the coachbuilt car is long gone, but for just a brief moment a man had a vision of what could be. To that end, this Buick Roadmaster Custom by Bayliff, with its incredible length and nicely proportioned body lines, makes for a stunning car that is like no other. Certainly, the work “unique” is overused, but in this case, it truly is unique as the only one of its kind ever built. For a Buick that carries a touch of elegance in a unique way, this is a special car....more

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1955 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible Coupe

Lot # 44 (Sale Order: 17 of 21)      

331 cid OHV V-8 engine with dual four-barrel carburetors, 270 HP, four-speed Hydra-Matic automatic transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle, four-wheel hydraulically-assisted drum brakes; wheelbase: 129”
General Motors introduced a trio of factory customized, luxuriously appointed, limited production convertibles that included the Buick Skylark, Oldsmobile Fiesta and the Cadillac Eldorado. Under the legendary automobile stylist Harley Earl’s direction, these cars featured bodies that were modified to create a longer, lower look. The Fiesta was made only in 1953, the Skylark lasted until 1954, but the glamorous Eldorado would endure for decades. The 1954 Eldorado Sport Convertible was less dramatically modified from the Series 62 Convertible, incorporating a deluxe interior and some special trim and standard wire wheels. 1955 proved to be a very successful year for Cadillac, as car sales were at an all-time high. It was also a significant year for the Eldorado, which benefited from a host of improvements. Although styling changes were rather minimal across the board, the Eldorado was the exception, as it received some unique styling features and a special high-performance engine that would further distinguish it from the rest of the Cadillac line. At the rear, the traditional Cadillac “fishtail” fins, in use since 1948, were replaced with sweeping, pointed tailfins, which were a quintessential feature of the spaceflight theme prevalent in the 1950s. Brake, turn signal, and backup lights were positioned at the base of the fins, and an Eldorado badge appeared on the rear deck. Additionally, the sporty Eldorado featured full rear-wheel cutouts, special interior, fiberglass convertible top boot cover and special ribbed chrome-plated moldings at the beltline below the side glass. The standard 331 cubic-inch V-8 engine offered on all 1955 Cadillacs produced 250 horsepower, which was 20 more than the previous model year. The Eldorado, however, was equipped with a 270-horsepower version that sported two four-barrel carburetors topped with special gold-colored “Batwing” air cleaner, which was also an optional high-performance setup available for other models. Furthermore, a Hydra-Matic automatic transmission was standard on all cars, and as expected, an array of comfort and convenience accessories were offered, many of which became standard equipment on the Eldorado Special Convertible. The myriad of standard equipment included a heating system, a new electrically operated antenna, a new signal-seeking pre-selector AM radio, fog lamps, “E-Z Eye” tinted glass, electrically operated six-way power seats, and power window and special built-in ribbed floor pads to name but a few. Motor Trend magazine tested a new 1955 model and concluded: “It might well be the ‘hottest-performing car’ of 1955 - definitely as roadable as the best of the ’55 crop.” At a price of nearly $6,000, the Eldorado, and all other Cadillacs in fact, were directed at clients who were particularly successful and well-to-do. The company’s advertising campaign unashamedly targeted those individuals who had “arrived”, furthering Cadillac’s image as a luxurious status symbol with flashy styling and performance to match. This spectacular looking example recently received cosmetic and mechanical restoration, including a documented rebuild of both the engine and transmission, and has been driven less than 100 miles since then. Special features on this Cadillac include a continental spare and a set of radial wide whitewall tires mounted on a set of authentic Cadillac wire wheels. The Eldorado Convertible offered here is a wonderful example that has benefited from a well-maintained professional restoration. Finished in a striking red exterior with a luxuriously appointed two-tone red and white leather interior, this convertible is complete with all of the amenities that one would come to expect from Cadillac. The vendor reports that this Cadillac is an excellent driver and performs well on the road with all components in proper working order. It's an ideal boulevard cruiser that will turn heads everywhere it goes....more

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1947 Chrysler Windsor Convertible

Lot # 47 (Sale Order: 18 of 21)      

250.6 cid L-head inline six-cylinder engine rated at 114 HP, four-speed Fluid Drive semi-automatic transmission, independent coil-spring front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes; wheelbase: 127.5”
When World War II ended, U.S. automakers changed over from war production to building cars very quickly in order to fulfill the demand for new automobiles. With little or no time to design an all-new car, Chrysler made just a slight styling change by extending the front fenders into the doors. This gave the postwar Chryslers a more aerodynamic look, but it was hardly needed as the motoring public was buying anything they could get their hands on. Chrysler’s names for their cars spoke to air of nobility with Royal, Windsor, Saratoga, and Town & Country all offered in coupes sedans, and convertibles. In particular, the Windsor convertible was a stylish car that offered excellent value in a car that looked great with the top up or down. Driving was also easy with Chrysler’s semi-automatic Fluid Drive transmission that was an option at just $32. For anyone who wanted a bit more than the average Ford or Chevy, Chrysler had the answer. Offered here is an excellent example of this fine car with a 1947 Windsor finished in Sumac Red with a beautiful red leather interior to match. This Windsor was fully restored in 2004 and has been mostly displayed since but has been regularly serviced and maintained with an occasional drive since it was recommissioned. The handsome styling of Chrysler’s postwar cars is clearly evident in this Windsor with its large chrome wraparound bumper up front and an egg-crate styled grille that carries enough chrome to light up the night sky. Chrysler’s elegant company crest on the front of the hood is a work of art with multiple colors and a king’s crown at the top. The elegant profile with its long hood and short deck offers just the right proportions for a car of its size. At the rear is a sloping deck with another large wraparound bumper that actually reaches to the rear wheel opening. Beautifully styled chrome taillights and a large center brake light all feature real glass and the Chrysler emblem rides on the trunk lid. This Windsor is also equipped with twin rearview mirrors. A tan convertible top offers a nice contrast to its deep red color and is also powered. The interior of this Windsor shows the expert level of craftsmanship in its restoration with fine red leather upholstery. In keeping with the 1940s, seating is large and comfortable while the dashboard carries a style all its own with just the right amount of chrome and all gauges neatly housed in a single pod directly ahead of the driver. Driving is easy thanks to Chrysler’s semiautomatic Fluid Drive transmission that allows for shift-free driving while underway. This Windsor rides on wide whitewall tires with Chrysler logo chrome hubcaps and beauty rings to match. Power for this Windsor comes from one of the best engines ever made with Chrysler’s 250.6 cubic-inch inline six with 114 horsepower. Anyone who has ever owned one of these will attest to the fact that they literally can run forever. The engine compartment in this Windsor is clean and tidy with correct colors, proper wiring, and correct hose clamps. Chrysler cars for 1947 were great looking cars and this beautiful Windsor proves it. Its bright colors and pristine condition make for an interesting car that offers excellent Chrysler reliability with the stylish look of the late 1940s. For the very best of Chrysler’s fine products, this is a Windsor that turns heads wherever it goes. Collectors of Chrysler’s fine line of cars should look this one over very closely order to fully appreciate the quality and craftsmanship of its restoration....more

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1934 Pontiac 603 Sedan

Lot # 50 (Sale Order: 19 of 21)      

223 cid inline eight-cylinder engine, 84 HP, three-speed manual transmission with overdrive gear, four-wheel drum brake system, semi-elliptic leaf spring suspension; wheelbase: 117”
This 1934 Pontiac 603 sedan was purchased by its current owner from eBay in March 2001. It was delivered in unrestored condition from Owensboro, Kentucky to its new home in Phoenix, Arizona. With under 25,000 miles on the odometer, the car had seen little use after several decades of storage. Despite this, the sturdy Pontiac remained solid and showed little signs of its age. With a valve job, fuel tank cleaning and a good coat of wax, the Pontiac was on the road again, motoring its way around the greater Phoenix area with a few longer-range trips thrown in here and there. Anticipating a trek to Iowa for the Pontiac Flathead Reunion of 2009, the owner decided to have the engine overhauled in Tempe, Arizona. Regretfully, the car did not make the cross-country drive, throwing a rod bearing about halfway through the journey. Determined to bring his Pontiac up to speed, the owner brought the car to Mike Graham of Graham Performance Engines. While at GPE, it was outfitted with Babbitt bearings made specially by Hart’s Machine Shop in Cecil, Ohio. Upon completion of the rebuild, Mike informed the owner that the previous rebuild was substandard and incorrectly completed. Finally, in 2009, the Pontiac was successfully driven back across country, making it all the way to Phoenix with not one issue. Over the next several years the car continued to be driven and enjoyed, winning many awards at local auto shows including the annual BOP show in Scottsdale, Arizona. At this point the owner added turn signals, an LED third brake light, and two sideview mirrors for the sake of safety. In addition, both bumpers were re-chromed, and an accessory trunk purchased and added to the car. In 2011, the owner once again attempted another cross-country road trip, but when the mechanic over-advanced the timing, the Pontiac once again did not make it. As a result, it was brought back to Mike Graham’s Garage, and with another overhaul of the engine, the car made it all the way from Ohio to Phoenix with no issues. Over the next few years, the car underwent a meticulous restoration including soda blasting parts of the frame, countless hours-worth of re-chroming, and a complete replacement of the entire interior to its original Mohair patterns from LeBaron Bonney/Hampton Coach of Amesbury, Massachusetts. For this restoration, the owner conducted extensive research to recreate the originality that would have been seen on this car when it had been delivered new to the showroom. Everything, down to the rubber patterns on the running boards from Hunley Acuff in Georgia and the grain of the interior trim wood from Crin Dema in Illinois, had been matched. Bob’s Automobilia provided the exact front floor rubber mat, and numerous additional parts were acquired from Steel Rubber Products, California Pontiac Restorations, eBay, local swap meets, and various other suppliers. Finishing off the details, Ron Hernandez of Ron’s Pinstriping hand painted the Lemon Yellow pinstriping to match the car’s originality. The result of this impressive restoration gives the prospective buyer a glimpse of what a 1934 Pontiac Model 603 such as this one would look like exactly, the day it rolled off the assembly line in Michigan. Since then, this car has been featured in Hemmings, a print copy of the issue to be included with the sale. In 2016, the car was outfitted with an overdrive gear by the late Lloyd Young of Winchester, Ohio where he, along with renowned machinist Glenn Metzler, installed the unit themselves. This Pontiac comes well-equipped with original options including a functionally restored Pontiac Air Chief AM radio, premium heater, Supertone dual horn, bumper guards, and a right-hand tail lamp. In addition, this car has also been outfitted with chrome wheel rings and hubcaps, a new radiator ornament, a locking gas cap, and a rare antenna system that mounts below the running board. Expertly maintained, this Pontiac recently received new shocks, new rear wheel seals, a transmission rebuild, and new brake linings and drums. A Pertronix ignition has taken the place of the old points system with a new coil and ignition switch installed. A new six-volt alternator has replaced the original style generator, along with a new wiring harness added. The windshield and rear window glass, even including the seals and channels, have also been replaced. The car has since been strictly maintained to the recommended service/lubrication schedule and it even comes with additional spare parts, literature, manuals, maintenance guides, and original advertising materials. Simply put, there is undoubtedly no better 1934 Pontiac 603 Sedan quite like this one. Don’t miss out on the chance to own this truly exquisite, skillfully restored piece of Pontiac history....more

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1931 Ford Model A DeLuxe Roadster

Lot # 53 (Sale Order: 20 of 21)      

201 cid four-cylinder inline L-head engine, 40 HP, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle with transverse semi-elliptic leaf spring, live rear axle with transverse semi-elliptic leaf spring, four-wheel mechanical drum brakes; wheelbase: 103.5”
Upon conclusion of the Model T’s nearly 20-year production run, Ford introduced the Model A as the successor to the “Tin Lizzie.” Consumers, though still weary from the Crash of 1929, were undoubtedly ready for a change in Ford’s product lineup. Much thought was given into the heir to Ford’s vehicular throne. By reverting to the first letter of the alphabet, Ford was symbolizing and emphasizing the tremendous impact this vehicle would have on the company. Like the T before it, the A offered wide variety of options and trim levels, beginning with the Roadster at $385 and ending with the top-of-the-line Town Car at $1,400. Like its predecessor, the Model A had a four-cylinder L-head engine and semi-elliptic front and rear transverse springs. Aside from that, the Model A was comprised of over a thousand more additional parts and components than the T. For starters, the water-cooled side-valve engine of the Model A offered 40 horsepower, twice that of its precursor, and could attain a top speed of 65 miles per hour. The often difficult and fussy magneto starting system was replaced with a conventional battery ignition, and the planetary transmission gave way to a sliding gear three-speed unit. Model As also included a brand-new stopping system which included a brake on each wheel. While exterior features did maintain a link with those of the Model T, larger tires and a high belt line showed that obvious design influence from Lincoln was used in the A. Other new attributes included a wider variety of interesting color choices and competitively marked sales prices. Ford priced the its new machine at just $450, and over the next four years it would produce 4.8 million despite the prolonged economic issues hampering the U.S. economy. After its first two years in production the Model A received a face-lift for 1930. Additionally, wider tires were mounted to smaller-diameter 19-inch wheels and being mildly restyled with larger mudguards giving the car a lower, more modern look. The consumer response to these changes was evident on the sales floor, and Ford outsold Chevrolet two-to-one in 1929 and 1930 with more than 1.4 million cars sold. This good-looking, Deluxe Rumble Seat Roadster represents the top-of-the-line offering for the Model A in the 1931 model year. Subject to a thorough restoration done to a high level in the late 1990s, it is finished in the lovely combination of green with Apple Green pinstripes and wheels, and black fenders. The chrome was also restored and shines brightly, and an auxiliary black luggage case is finished to a similar standard. Side-mounted spares adorn both the left and right fenders with all four wire wheels dressed in the appropriate whitewall tires. The brown leatherette interior syndicates perfectly with the green exterior while the fresh, clean, and crisp tan top finishes off the look of the quintessential early ‘30s motorcar. Originally sold in Pennsylvania, this A was purchased from its original owner around and first restored in 1960. Since then, it remained in the same family until another restoration in the late 1990s which has held up with astounding hardiness. With the quality of the exterior and interior restoration, it is likely to have been mechanically finished to a level equivalent to its cosmetics. These cars are acknowledged as being easy and fun to drive, cheap to maintain, and are backed by numerous enthusiast clubs. Because of its influence and timelessness, Ford’s Model A continues to be one of the recurrent favorites of the classic car collecting hobby. Whether being acquired as a gateway purchase into the field of motoring or an addition to a collection, it's not easy to beat the style, design and value of the Ford Model A Deluxe Roadster....more

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1972 Ford Thunderbird Landau Hardtop

Lot # 56 (Sale Order: 21 of 21)      

429 cid V-8 engine, 201 HP, four-barrel Autolite carburetor, four-speed automatic transmission, Independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with rear leaf springs, power-assisted front disc brakes, rear drum brakes; wheelbase 120.5”
When first introduced, Ford’s little Thunderbird was not so much a “sports car” as it was a “personal car”. With the introduction of the four-seater “Squarebirds” in 1958, the T-bird found its real niche in the market as the industry’s first “Personal Luxury Car.” Any pretense to being “sporty” had pretty much been erased from this model’s immediate future, though the idea of a performance-oriented vehicle would return with some limitations in the 1980s. However, through the 1960s, Thunderbird’s dimensions and luxury status continued to grow. From 1958 to 1966, T-bird shared the unibody design elements of the Lincoln Continentals and were assembled at the same factory in Wixom, Michigan. In 1967, Thunderbird departed from Lincoln in assembly techniques and returned to a body-on-frame construction. In mid-1968, the first body-on-frame Lincoln in many years returned with the appearance of the Continental Mark III coupe. For 1972, an all-new Thunderbird appeared that was very closely related to the new Continental Mark IV. This stunning example of the Thunderbird from 1972 exemplifies the superiority the American car market still had in the world of luxurious cars. Finished in Harvest Yellow, it is fitted with the optional vinyl top in brown and fitted with the very desirable landau side bars. Powered by the mighty 429 cubic-inch big-block V-8 engine, it features a full assortment of power amenities such as power steering, power front disc brakes, power windows, and power seats, as well as factory air-conditioning, cruise control, tilt steering wheel, factory AM-FM stereophonic radio and a lavish interior finished in its original tan leather. The Morgan's acquired this car in 1972 and it has been part of thier collection its entire life. Showing under 56,000 miles from new, this is a remarkably well-preserved original automobile would be a perfect fit for any historical preservation award or for vintage car touring and doing that in the lap of luxury. When introduced, this new generation of personal luxury from Ford Motor Company was very well-received with a total of 57,814 examples being produced. With dependable mechanics and excellent initial assembly quality, most of these T-birds were driven and enjoyed by their owners, leaving very few survivors anywhere near the condition of this car. Offered from the Chuck Morgan Estate Collection, where all his vehicles were maintained to the highest degree, this 48-year old single-owner hardtop will deliver many more years of enjoyable motoring and may very well capture a few ribbons and trophies along the way....more

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