The Imperial War Museum Duxford Motor Car Auction

The Imperial War Museum Duxford Motor Car Auction

Wednesday, March 29, 2017  |  1:00 PM EUR (GMT)
Auction closed.
The Imperial War Museum Duxford Motor Car Auction

The Imperial War Museum Duxford Motor Car Auction

Wednesday, March 29, 2017  |  1:00 PM EUR (GMT)
Auction closed.
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Description

An auction of Classic & Collectors Motor Cars at Imperial War Museum Duxford

H and H Classics Limited


+44 (0) 1925 210035
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1948 Riley RM 2.5 Litre Drophead Coupe Conversion

Lot # 1 (Sale Order: 1 of 122)      

- Drophead Coupe conversion, body converted and restored in 2015 - Engine overhaul in May 2016 - Lovely open tourer ready to be enjoyed The RM Series cars were the last 'proper' Rileys - the swansong of the marque before it was subsumed into the mighty British Motor Corporation. The model range was manufactured in Coventry until 1949, when production moved to the MG factory at Abingdon. The RMA/RME were large Saloons powered by 1.5-litre four-cylinder engines, while the 7-inches longer RMB/RMF models featured twin-cam 2.5-litre units. The RMC and RMD were limited edition soft-tops. While the latter was a conventional two-door Drophead Coupe, the RMC was a two-door Roadster version of the RMB. The 2.5 litre four-cylinder powerplant produced some 100bhp and was also unusual in having twin pushrod-operated camshafts placed high in the cylinder block. The chassis number of the car offered today appears to denote it started life as an RMB saloon. The vendor advises JLV 906 was converted to drophead coupe coachwork in 2015, a new interior fitted, whilst a comprehensive engine overhaul was carried out in May 2016. Now resplendent in Bronze with Magnolia interior, this most handsome Riley is described as being in "fabulous condition" with "excellent" bodywork, interior and engine. Forming part of a private collection, we are informed it received a thorough check over in November 2016 at a cost of £1000. This must surely represent an ideal opportunity to acquire a wonderful looking four seater open Riley which will cruise at 80mph for much less than the price of an original.
- Drophead Coupe conversion, body converted and restored in 2015 - Engine overhaul in May 2016 - Lovely open tourer ready to be enjoyed The RM Series cars ...morewere the last 'proper' Rileys - the swansong of the marque before it was subsumed into the mighty British Motor Corporation. The model range was manufactured in Coventry until 1949, when production moved to the MG factory at Abingdon. The RMA/RME were large Saloons powered by 1.5-litre four-cylinder engines, while the 7-inches longer RMB/RMF models featured twin-cam 2.5-litre units. The RMC and RMD were limited edition soft-tops. While the latter was a conventional two-door Drophead Coupe, the RMC was a two-door Roadster version of the RMB. The 2.5 litre four-cylinder powerplant produced some 100bhp and was also unusual in having twin pushrod-operated camshafts placed high in the cylinder block. The chassis number of the car offered today appears to denote it started life as an RMB saloon. The vendor advises JLV 906 was converted to drophead coupe coachwork in 2015, a new interior fitted, whilst a comprehensive engine overhaul was carried out in May 2016. Now resplendent in Bronze with Magnolia interior, this most handsome Riley is described as being in "fabulous condition" with "excellent" bodywork, interior and engine. Forming part of a private collection, we are informed it received a thorough check over in November 2016 at a cost of £1000. This must surely represent an ideal opportunity to acquire a wonderful looking four seater open Riley which will cruise at 80mph for much less than the price of an original.

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1929 Armstrong Siddeley 12hp Tourer

Lot # 2 (Sale Order: 2 of 122)      

- Offered from the estate of the late Sir Colin Hope who was a former President of the SMMT (1991-93), Trustee of the National Motor Museum (1991-2002), and Patron of the Armstrong Siddeley Heritage Trust from 2011 Introduced in October 1928, the Armstrong Siddeley 12hp was arguably the marque's first model to target mass market sales. Powered by a sidevalve, six-cylinder 1236cc engine, the newcomer offered class competitive performance and was more refined than some four-cylinder rivals. Initially available as a two-seater coupe, four-seater tourer or fabric saloon, the 12hp could be had with more elaborate coachwork by October 1930 including a coachbuilt saloon derivative which was nicely crafted but decidedly heavy. Entering the late Sir Colin Hope's collection in 1994, the Four-Seater Tourer has since been treated to four new wings, replacement running boards and an engine overhaul. Little used over the past seven years, it was in running order when photographed during late October 2016 but will require recommissioning prior to road use. The Tourer appears to be complete but presents as an older restoration with various paint imperfections and some wear to the upholstery etc.
- Offered from the estate of the late Sir Colin Hope who was a former President of the SMMT (1991-93), Trustee of the National Motor Museum (1991-2002), and Patron of the...more Armstrong Siddeley Heritage Trust from 2011 Introduced in October 1928, the Armstrong Siddeley 12hp was arguably the marque's first model to target mass market sales. Powered by a sidevalve, six-cylinder 1236cc engine, the newcomer offered class competitive performance and was more refined than some four-cylinder rivals. Initially available as a two-seater coupe, four-seater tourer or fabric saloon, the 12hp could be had with more elaborate coachwork by October 1930 including a coachbuilt saloon derivative which was nicely crafted but decidedly heavy. Entering the late Sir Colin Hope's collection in 1994, the Four-Seater Tourer has since been treated to four new wings, replacement running boards and an engine overhaul. Little used over the past seven years, it was in running order when photographed during late October 2016 but will require recommissioning prior to road use. The Tourer appears to be complete but presents as an older restoration with various paint imperfections and some wear to the upholstery etc.

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1925 Armstrong Siddeley 14hp MK II Cotswold Tourer

Lot # 3 (Sale Order: 3 of 122)      

- Offered from the estate of the late Sir Colin Hope who was a former President of the SMMT (1991-93), Trustee of the National Motor Museum (1991-2002), and Patron of the Armstrong Siddeley Heritage Trust from 2011 Introduced in 1923, the Armstrong Siddeley 14hp was rather more affordable than its 18hp and 30hp siblings. Powered by an 1852cc four-cylinder OHV engine, the newcomer was further distinguished from the marque's larger horsepower models by the use of a flat rather than V-shaped radiator. Launched in 1925, the Mark II version was based around a new chassis equipped with with four-wheel drum brakes and semi-elliptic front and rear springs (as opposed to the cantilever springs used on the Mark I). The improved chassis enabled the company to offer a wider range of open and closed body styles. The Cotswold tourer - a full five-seater car which was supplied with a hood and side screens - proved to be the most popular open derivative. Entering the late Sir Colin Hope's collection in 1993, the Mark II Cotswold Tourer has since been treated to four new wings, new running boards and a re-spray. The engine is understood to have been overhauled some fifteen years ago with the gearbox receiving new internals at the same time. Little used over the past seven years, it was in running order when photographed during late October 2016 but will require recommissioning prior to road use. The Tourer appears to be complete. The paintwork and interior trim look to be in good order.
- Offered from the estate of the late Sir Colin Hope who was a former President of the SMMT (1991-93), Trustee of the National Motor Museum (1991-2002), and Patron of the...more Armstrong Siddeley Heritage Trust from 2011 Introduced in 1923, the Armstrong Siddeley 14hp was rather more affordable than its 18hp and 30hp siblings. Powered by an 1852cc four-cylinder OHV engine, the newcomer was further distinguished from the marque's larger horsepower models by the use of a flat rather than V-shaped radiator. Launched in 1925, the Mark II version was based around a new chassis equipped with with four-wheel drum brakes and semi-elliptic front and rear springs (as opposed to the cantilever springs used on the Mark I). The improved chassis enabled the company to offer a wider range of open and closed body styles. The Cotswold tourer - a full five-seater car which was supplied with a hood and side screens - proved to be the most popular open derivative. Entering the late Sir Colin Hope's collection in 1993, the Mark II Cotswold Tourer has since been treated to four new wings, new running boards and a re-spray. The engine is understood to have been overhauled some fifteen years ago with the gearbox receiving new internals at the same time. Little used over the past seven years, it was in running order when photographed during late October 2016 but will require recommissioning prior to road use. The Tourer appears to be complete. The paintwork and interior trim look to be in good order.

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1928 Armstrong Siddeley 15hp Tourer

Lot # 4 (Sale Order: 4 of 122)      

- Offered from the estate of the late Sir Colin Hope who was a former President of the SMMT (1991-93), Trustee of the National Motor Museum (1991-2002), and Patron of the Armstrong Siddeley Heritage Trust from 2011 Introduced in October 1927, the six-cylinder Armstrong Siddeley 15hp could be had with the same range of coachwork as the marque's established four-cylinder 14hp model. Boasting a slightly larger engine (1900cc vs 1852cc) albeit with side rather than overhead valves, the newcomer supplanted its older sibling for the 1930 season. Entering the late Sir Colin Hope's collection in 1998, this particular Open Tourer example had been supplied new to a New Zealand-based chicken famer some seventy years earlier. The subject of much past restoration work, more recent fettling has including the fitment of a new water pump and replacement flywheel. Little used over the past seven years, it was in running order when photographed during late October 2016 but will require recommissioning prior to road use. The Tourer appears to be complete. The paintwork and interior trim look to be in good order.
- Offered from the estate of the late Sir Colin Hope who was a former President of the SMMT (1991-93), Trustee of the National Motor Museum (1991-2002), and Patron of the...more Armstrong Siddeley Heritage Trust from 2011 Introduced in October 1927, the six-cylinder Armstrong Siddeley 15hp could be had with the same range of coachwork as the marque's established four-cylinder 14hp model. Boasting a slightly larger engine (1900cc vs 1852cc) albeit with side rather than overhead valves, the newcomer supplanted its older sibling for the 1930 season. Entering the late Sir Colin Hope's collection in 1998, this particular Open Tourer example had been supplied new to a New Zealand-based chicken famer some seventy years earlier. The subject of much past restoration work, more recent fettling has including the fitment of a new water pump and replacement flywheel. Little used over the past seven years, it was in running order when photographed during late October 2016 but will require recommissioning prior to road use. The Tourer appears to be complete. The paintwork and interior trim look to be in good order.

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1926 Armstrong Siddeley 18hp MK II Short Tourer

Lot # 5 (Sale Order: 5 of 122)      

- Offered from the estate of the late Sir Colin Hope who was a former President of the SMMT (1991-93), Trustee of the National Motor Museum (1991-2002), and Patron of the Armstrong Siddeley Heritage Trust from 2011 Introduced in 1921, the Armstrong Siddeley 18hp was a derivative of the marque's first offering - the 30hp - which had debuted some two years earlier. Powered by a smaller 2318cc OHV six-cylinder engine, the newcomer also sat on a shorter 10ft 0in wheelbase but utilised the same 4ft 8in track and suspension layout as its larger sibling. The company made 2,126 examples of the 18hp in its original form. A Mark II version appeared in Autumn 1925 but was heavily revised the following Spring complete with a new chassis and enlarged 2872cc engine. Two versions of the updated design were available, the 'Long' and 'Short' derivatives differing in terms of wheelbase length and final drive ratio etc. The bigger engine soon attracted the attention of the taxation authorities and thus the 18hp Mark II became the 20hp for the 1927 season. The Short 20hp and Long 20hp remained in production until 1931 by which time a total of 6,641 18hp Mark 2 and 20hp cars had been completed. The Short chassis car was much more popular than the Long 20 and made up three-quarters of total production. The Short-Chassis car was more affordable and would have performed better than the Long-Chassis when fitted with the increasingly popular and heavy saloon coachwork. Entering the late Sir Colin Hope's collection in 1996, this particular 18hp MKII Short Tourer has since been treated to an engine overhaul. A brass plaque affixed to its bulkhead indicates that the car was restored by D&C Brooks of Northampton during 1993. Little used over the past seven years, it was in running order when photographed during late October 2016 but will require recommissioning prior to road use. The Tourer appears to be complete. The paintwork and interior trim look to be in fair to good order.
- Offered from the estate of the late Sir Colin Hope who was a former President of the SMMT (1991-93), Trustee of the National Motor Museum (1991-2002), and Patron of the...more Armstrong Siddeley Heritage Trust from 2011 Introduced in 1921, the Armstrong Siddeley 18hp was a derivative of the marque's first offering - the 30hp - which had debuted some two years earlier. Powered by a smaller 2318cc OHV six-cylinder engine, the newcomer also sat on a shorter 10ft 0in wheelbase but utilised the same 4ft 8in track and suspension layout as its larger sibling. The company made 2,126 examples of the 18hp in its original form. A Mark II version appeared in Autumn 1925 but was heavily revised the following Spring complete with a new chassis and enlarged 2872cc engine. Two versions of the updated design were available, the 'Long' and 'Short' derivatives differing in terms of wheelbase length and final drive ratio etc. The bigger engine soon attracted the attention of the taxation authorities and thus the 18hp Mark II became the 20hp for the 1927 season. The Short 20hp and Long 20hp remained in production until 1931 by which time a total of 6,641 18hp Mark 2 and 20hp cars had been completed. The Short chassis car was much more popular than the Long 20 and made up three-quarters of total production. The Short-Chassis car was more affordable and would have performed better than the Long-Chassis when fitted with the increasingly popular and heavy saloon coachwork. Entering the late Sir Colin Hope's collection in 1996, this particular 18hp MKII Short Tourer has since been treated to an engine overhaul. A brass plaque affixed to its bulkhead indicates that the car was restored by D&C Brooks of Northampton during 1993. Little used over the past seven years, it was in running order when photographed during late October 2016 but will require recommissioning prior to road use. The Tourer appears to be complete. The paintwork and interior trim look to be in fair to good order.

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1928 Armstrong Siddeley 20hp Long Ascot Tourer

Lot # 6 (Sale Order: 6 of 122)      

- Offered from the estate of the late Sir Colin Hope who was a former President of the SMMT (1991-93), Trustee of the National Motor Museum (1991-2002), and Patron of the Armstrong Siddeley Heritage Trust from 2011 Introduced in 1921, the Armstrong Siddeley 18hp was a derivative of the marque's first offering - the 30hp - which had debuted some two years earlier. Powered by a smaller 2318cc OHV six-cylinder engine, the newcomer also sat on a shorter 10ft 0in wheelbase but utilised the same 4ft 8in track and suspension layout as its larger sibling. The company made 2,126 examples of the 18hp in its original form. A Mark II version appeared in Autumn 1925 but was heavily revised the following Spring complete with a new chassis and enlarged 2872cc engine. Available in Short and Long guises, the two versions of the updated design differed in terms of wheelbase length and final drive ratio etc. The bigger engine soon attracted the attention of the taxation authorities and thus the 18hp Mark II became the 20hp for the 1927 season. The Short 20hp and Long 20hp remained in production until 1931 by which time a total of 6,641 18hp Mark 2 and 20hp cars had been completed. The Short chassis car was much more popular than the Long 20 and made up three quarters of the total production. The Short-Chassis car was more affordable and would have performed better than the Long-Chassis when fitted with the increasingly popular and heavy saloon coachwork. Supplied new to the Earl of Duncie, this particular Long 20hp Ascot Tourer entered the late Sir Colin Hope's ownership some seventy-one years later. Self-evidently the subject of much past restoration work, the Armstrong Siddeley was treated to an engine overhaul approximately 10-15 years ago. Little used over the past seven years, it was in running order when photographed during late October 2016 but will require recommissioning prior to road use. The Tourer appears to be complete. The paintwork and interior trim look to be in fair to good order.
- Offered from the estate of the late Sir Colin Hope who was a former President of the SMMT (1991-93), Trustee of the National Motor Museum (1991-2002), and Patron of the...more Armstrong Siddeley Heritage Trust from 2011 Introduced in 1921, the Armstrong Siddeley 18hp was a derivative of the marque's first offering - the 30hp - which had debuted some two years earlier. Powered by a smaller 2318cc OHV six-cylinder engine, the newcomer also sat on a shorter 10ft 0in wheelbase but utilised the same 4ft 8in track and suspension layout as its larger sibling. The company made 2,126 examples of the 18hp in its original form. A Mark II version appeared in Autumn 1925 but was heavily revised the following Spring complete with a new chassis and enlarged 2872cc engine. Available in Short and Long guises, the two versions of the updated design differed in terms of wheelbase length and final drive ratio etc. The bigger engine soon attracted the attention of the taxation authorities and thus the 18hp Mark II became the 20hp for the 1927 season. The Short 20hp and Long 20hp remained in production until 1931 by which time a total of 6,641 18hp Mark 2 and 20hp cars had been completed. The Short chassis car was much more popular than the Long 20 and made up three quarters of the total production. The Short-Chassis car was more affordable and would have performed better than the Long-Chassis when fitted with the increasingly popular and heavy saloon coachwork. Supplied new to the Earl of Duncie, this particular Long 20hp Ascot Tourer entered the late Sir Colin Hope's ownership some seventy-one years later. Self-evidently the subject of much past restoration work, the Armstrong Siddeley was treated to an engine overhaul approximately 10-15 years ago. Little used over the past seven years, it was in running order when photographed during late October 2016 but will require recommissioning prior to road use. The Tourer appears to be complete. The paintwork and interior trim look to be in fair to good order.

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1935 Armstrong Siddeley Special MK II Touring Limousine

Lot # 7 (Sale Order: 7 of 122)      

- Offered from the estate of the late Sir Colin Hope who was a former President of the SMMT (1991-93), Trustee of the National Motor Museum (1991-2002), and Patron of the Armstrong Siddeley Heritage Trust from 2011 Arguably the most exotic Armstrong Siddeley ever produced, the Siddeley Special was unveiled at the 1932 Olympia Motor Show. Fabricated from aircraft-grade Hiduminium alloy, its 5 litre straight-six engine was notably smooth and powerful. Available with a variety of open and closed coachwork, the Siddeley Special was among the best performing luxury cars of its generation. As well as the choice of two wheelbase lengths, the Mark II version also ushered in a host of detail improvements including twin SU carburettors. Of the 253 Siddeley Specials made, just 30 or so are known to have survived to the present day. Initially serving as a factory demonstrator, chassis 3418 was sold to its first private keeper, Sir George Shirtcliffe, on 5th September 1936. Resident in the Antipodes for most of its life, the Touring Limousine was repatriated by the late Sir Colin Hope during winter 1998 and reissued with its original UK number plate, 'BWK 256', the following year. Seemingly never allowed to deteriorate to the point of needing restoration, the Siddeley Special is understood to have been mechanically overhauled whilst in Australia. More recent work has included a brake system overhaul. Apparently complete, the Special is in fair cosmetic order. Running and driving when photographed during late October 2016, it will nonetheless require recommissioning prior to road use.
- Offered from the estate of the late Sir Colin Hope who was a former President of the SMMT (1991-93), Trustee of the National Motor Museum (1991-2002), and Patron of the...more Armstrong Siddeley Heritage Trust from 2011 Arguably the most exotic Armstrong Siddeley ever produced, the Siddeley Special was unveiled at the 1932 Olympia Motor Show. Fabricated from aircraft-grade Hiduminium alloy, its 5 litre straight-six engine was notably smooth and powerful. Available with a variety of open and closed coachwork, the Siddeley Special was among the best performing luxury cars of its generation. As well as the choice of two wheelbase lengths, the Mark II version also ushered in a host of detail improvements including twin SU carburettors. Of the 253 Siddeley Specials made, just 30 or so are known to have survived to the present day. Initially serving as a factory demonstrator, chassis 3418 was sold to its first private keeper, Sir George Shirtcliffe, on 5th September 1936. Resident in the Antipodes for most of its life, the Touring Limousine was repatriated by the late Sir Colin Hope during winter 1998 and reissued with its original UK number plate, 'BWK 256', the following year. Seemingly never allowed to deteriorate to the point of needing restoration, the Siddeley Special is understood to have been mechanically overhauled whilst in Australia. More recent work has included a brake system overhaul. Apparently complete, the Special is in fair cosmetic order. Running and driving when photographed during late October 2016, it will nonetheless require recommissioning prior to road use.

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1968 Lotus Elan +2

Lot # 8 (Sale Order: 8 of 122)      

- Sold new in New Zealand - Repainted and five speed gearbox fitted in early 1990s - c.53,000 recorded miles, MoT to November 2017 The Elan+2 could so easily have been an automotive compromise and there are numerous examples from rival marques of how adding space so often destroys both pace and grace. But the ever-resourceful Ron Hickman proved more than up to the task of adding two seats to his original masterpiece. No longer did a new father need to forsake his sports car when the kids came along, he just bought an Elan +2 and installed them in the back. Having recently returned to the UK from New Zealand, where it was sold new, the vendor advises FND 961F is in "excellent" condition in regards to its bodywork, dark yellow paintwork and engine with "very good" black interior trim. With no signs of stress cracking to the bodywork, its condition would certainly concur with it having led a cared for existence. Retaining its original chassis, the car was repainted in the early 1990s at which time a 5-speed gearbox was also fitted. Displaying some 53,088 miles which though unwarranted could well be genuine, this appealing Elan comes with a Swansea V5 document, MoT to November 2017, Lotus Heritage Certificate and a large folder of invoices.
- Sold new in New Zealand - Repainted and five speed gearbox fitted in early 1990s - c.53,000 recorded miles, MoT to November 2017 The Elan+2 could so easi...morely have been an automotive compromise and there are numerous examples from rival marques of how adding space so often destroys both pace and grace. But the ever-resourceful Ron Hickman proved more than up to the task of adding two seats to his original masterpiece. No longer did a new father need to forsake his sports car when the kids came along, he just bought an Elan +2 and installed them in the back. Having recently returned to the UK from New Zealand, where it was sold new, the vendor advises FND 961F is in "excellent" condition in regards to its bodywork, dark yellow paintwork and engine with "very good" black interior trim. With no signs of stress cracking to the bodywork, its condition would certainly concur with it having led a cared for existence. Retaining its original chassis, the car was repainted in the early 1990s at which time a 5-speed gearbox was also fitted. Displaying some 53,088 miles which though unwarranted could well be genuine, this appealing Elan comes with a Swansea V5 document, MoT to November 2017, Lotus Heritage Certificate and a large folder of invoices.

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1971 MG B Roadster

Lot # 9 (Sale Order: 9 of 122)      

PLEASE NOTE: The interior for this vehicle is Red and Black. - Comprehensive restoration in 2004 - Part of private collection and in wonderful condition - Recommissioned following purchase in 2015, MoT to October 2017 Initially, the B was only available in Roadster form and at launch, the model was powered by a three-bearing version of the 1798cc B-Series engine that produced 95bhp at 5,400rpm. However, with an eye on superior reliability, this unit was replaced by a five-bearing one two years into production. The MKII version of the venerable MGB was introduced in 1967 and brought an updated manual gearbox, the option of a Borg Warner automatic unit, revised rear axle, and switch from dynamos to alternators. This lovely example was subject to a comprehensive restoration in 2004 before forming part of a private collection and subsequently being acquired by the vendor and added to his own collection in 2015. More recently recommissioned, this most attractive MG B is described as being in "superb" condition with a "fabulous" black interior and hood and "excellent" engine. The white bodywork also presents to a high standard. Carrying an MoT to October 2017 and showing c.93,600 miles on its odometer, OSB 121K has recently led a pampered existence and would be a delight to enjoy on a summer's day or a potential winner on the show circuit.
PLEASE NOTE: The interior for this vehicle is Red and Black. - Comprehensive restoration in 2004 - Part of private collection and in wonderful condition - Re...morecommissioned following purchase in 2015, MoT to October 2017 Initially, the B was only available in Roadster form and at launch, the model was powered by a three-bearing version of the 1798cc B-Series engine that produced 95bhp at 5,400rpm. However, with an eye on superior reliability, this unit was replaced by a five-bearing one two years into production. The MKII version of the venerable MGB was introduced in 1967 and brought an updated manual gearbox, the option of a Borg Warner automatic unit, revised rear axle, and switch from dynamos to alternators. This lovely example was subject to a comprehensive restoration in 2004 before forming part of a private collection and subsequently being acquired by the vendor and added to his own collection in 2015. More recently recommissioned, this most attractive MG B is described as being in "superb" condition with a "fabulous" black interior and hood and "excellent" engine. The white bodywork also presents to a high standard. Carrying an MoT to October 2017 and showing c.93,600 miles on its odometer, OSB 121K has recently led a pampered existence and would be a delight to enjoy on a summer's day or a potential winner on the show circuit.

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1932 Riley 9 Gamecock

Lot # 10 (Sale Order: 10 of 122)      

- 1 of just 52 or so Nine Gamecocks known to have survived - Current family ownership since 1965 - Offered with a collection of invoices, green log book and old MOT's It was the Riley 9 models produced with a wide choice of body styles between 1926 and 1938 that really put the company on the map, which with its unique 42bhp 1,087cc twin-camshaft engine soon found success in competition, further boosting the order book. During 1931, the Gamecock variant became the range's prime two-seat Tourer. It was an immediate success, with the underslung chassis producing a sleek, low body design quite unlike anything else available at the time. 'TF 7539' is one of c.52 Gamecocks known to remain in existence. Within the same family ownership since c.1965 it is currently part dismantled and in need of restoration, but believed to be complete. A replacement engine was installed in 1965 and another unit and gearbox are available by separate negotiation. Finished in White and trimmed in Red, the Riley comes complete with green log book and selection of invoices and old MOTs. A unique opportunity.
- 1 of just 52 or so Nine Gamecocks known to have survived - Current family ownership since 1965 - Offered with a collection of invoices, green log book and old...more MOT's It was the Riley 9 models produced with a wide choice of body styles between 1926 and 1938 that really put the company on the map, which with its unique 42bhp 1,087cc twin-camshaft engine soon found success in competition, further boosting the order book. During 1931, the Gamecock variant became the range's prime two-seat Tourer. It was an immediate success, with the underslung chassis producing a sleek, low body design quite unlike anything else available at the time. 'TF 7539' is one of c.52 Gamecocks known to remain in existence. Within the same family ownership since c.1965 it is currently part dismantled and in need of restoration, but believed to be complete. A replacement engine was installed in 1965 and another unit and gearbox are available by separate negotiation. Finished in White and trimmed in Red, the Riley comes complete with green log book and selection of invoices and old MOTs. A unique opportunity.

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c.1941 Willys MB Jeep 'O.A.R.E.'

Lot # 11 (Sale Order: 11 of 122)      

- A former US Armed Forces Jeep that was overhauled and modified by O.A.R.E. in Bologna immediately after WW2 - Imported from Italy in 2015 and used at last September's Goodwood Revival - Running and driving but would benefit from further recommissioning / restoration - The Italian Army decommissioned its final six Jeep-O.A.R.Es (O.A.R.E. standing for Army Auto Repair Workshop) in December 2003 At the cessation of WWII hostilities, mainland Europe was littered with military hardware of various nationalities. This included many examples of the ubiquitous Jeep abandoned by the allied forces. Some of those left in Italy were subsequently converted to the Italian army's unique specification by the 'O.A.R.E.' (Army Auto Repair Workshop) and the Willys MB now being offered is an example that remained in Italy until imported to these shores just two years ago. Though, like most that received the 'O.A.R.E.' treatment, the sale Jeep has been largely converted back to original specification, it still displays traces of the hinge mountings for the metal doors that were added, as well as Italian dashboard plaques with information about permissible speeds, the operation of the four-wheel drive transmission etc. The vehicle was most recently used at last September's Goodwood Revival meeting and, though running and driving, it would nevertheless benefit from a degree of further recommissioning/restoration.
- A former US Armed Forces Jeep that was overhauled and modified by O.A.R.E. in Bologna immediately after WW2 - Imported from Italy in 2015 and used at last Septembe...morer's Goodwood Revival - Running and driving but would benefit from further recommissioning / restoration - The Italian Army decommissioned its final six Jeep-O.A.R.Es (O.A.R.E. standing for Army Auto Repair Workshop) in December 2003 At the cessation of WWII hostilities, mainland Europe was littered with military hardware of various nationalities. This included many examples of the ubiquitous Jeep abandoned by the allied forces. Some of those left in Italy were subsequently converted to the Italian army's unique specification by the 'O.A.R.E.' (Army Auto Repair Workshop) and the Willys MB now being offered is an example that remained in Italy until imported to these shores just two years ago. Though, like most that received the 'O.A.R.E.' treatment, the sale Jeep has been largely converted back to original specification, it still displays traces of the hinge mountings for the metal doors that were added, as well as Italian dashboard plaques with information about permissible speeds, the operation of the four-wheel drive transmission etc. The vehicle was most recently used at last September's Goodwood Revival meeting and, though running and driving, it would nevertheless benefit from a degree of further recommissioning/restoration.

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1962 Fiat 500 D Trasformabile

Lot # 12 (Sale Order: 12 of 122)      

- Treated to an extensive marque specialist restoration - Suicide doors and full length retractable canvas roof for 'Transformable' motoring - UK registered with 'baby Ferrari' number plate and MOT'd until October 2017 Calling all Fiat Nuova aficionados - '328 UYO' is a stunningly-presented, low-mileage, matching-numbers, extensively-restored example of one of the most collectable versions - it has the rare combination of D specification, 'suicide' doors and full length (Trasformabile) sunroof that folds right back to the engine cover for optimum wind-in-the-hair motoring. Built on June 1st 1962 it originally resided in Umbria, where it was then treated to a thorough 8,000 Euro refurbishment in 2002. Its second owner was a resident of Bruges, which is where the 500 lived until imported to the UK by a Kent-based collector in 2015. Only recently it benefited from another respray in its original colour of Verde Chiaro and was equipped with many new parts including: exhaust system, battery, sunroof, and set of tyres. Still displaying just 37,213 kilometres, this little gem comes complete with period engine cover rack, wicker hamper and MOT into October 2017.
- Treated to an extensive marque specialist restoration - Suicide doors and full length retractable canvas roof for 'Transformable' motoring - UK registered wit...moreh 'baby Ferrari' number plate and MOT'd until October 2017 Calling all Fiat Nuova aficionados - '328 UYO' is a stunningly-presented, low-mileage, matching-numbers, extensively-restored example of one of the most collectable versions - it has the rare combination of D specification, 'suicide' doors and full length (Trasformabile) sunroof that folds right back to the engine cover for optimum wind-in-the-hair motoring. Built on June 1st 1962 it originally resided in Umbria, where it was then treated to a thorough 8,000 Euro refurbishment in 2002. Its second owner was a resident of Bruges, which is where the 500 lived until imported to the UK by a Kent-based collector in 2015. Only recently it benefited from another respray in its original colour of Verde Chiaro and was equipped with many new parts including: exhaust system, battery, sunroof, and set of tyres. Still displaying just 37,213 kilometres, this little gem comes complete with period engine cover rack, wicker hamper and MOT into October 2017.

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1958 Jaguar XK150 SE 3.4 Litre Fixed Head Coupe

Lot # 13 (Sale Order: 13 of 122)      

According to the Jaguar Heritage Certificate included in the sale, 'SPL 55' (the original registration was the Wolverhampton number 'VUK 987') was first registered to Jaguar dealer W M Hendrick of Walsall on May 3 1958, having vacated the Browns Lane production line on March 12. The Fixed Head Coupe's distinctive Orange bodywork is teamed with Brown interior trim and the Jaguar rides on painted wire wheels. It is understood the long term previous owner, a Mr Morton of Staffordshire, used the car for club racing. The most recent MOT certificate is dated 1991 and it is believed this could be the last time the XK took the road - whatever, it is now in need of restoration and priced accordingly. It is has the desirable SE specification and comes complete with green log book as well as the aforementioned Heritage Certificate. The odometer currently registers an unwarranted 78,000 miles.
According to the Jaguar Heritage Certificate included in the sale, 'SPL 55' (the original registration was the Wolverhampton number 'VUK 987') was first registered to Jag...moreuar dealer W M Hendrick of Walsall on May 3 1958, having vacated the Browns Lane production line on March 12. The Fixed Head Coupe's distinctive Orange bodywork is teamed with Brown interior trim and the Jaguar rides on painted wire wheels. It is understood the long term previous owner, a Mr Morton of Staffordshire, used the car for club racing. The most recent MOT certificate is dated 1991 and it is believed this could be the last time the XK took the road - whatever, it is now in need of restoration and priced accordingly. It is has the desirable SE specification and comes complete with green log book as well as the aforementioned Heritage Certificate. The odometer currently registers an unwarranted 78,000 miles.

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1909 Renault AX Tourer

Lot # 14 (Sale Order: 14 of 122)      

This immaculately-presented AX was apparently the property of a Lieutenant Colonel F E Manning back in 1961, and subsequently formed part of the Dennis Sharpe private collection for some 30 years before being offered for sale through Christie's in March 2003. Unsold it then passed to Orchid Cars from whom it was purchased by the previous owner, who set about its restoration. The vendor acquired the Renault in 2006 and completed the refurbishment by overhauling the steering box, radiator, magneto and commissioning a new bent ash hood frame and hood, and stainless steel exhaust, all to original specification plus a re-trimmed interior. The AX has since completed a variety of runs to France (achieving up to 425 miles in a week) and Germany, as well as such home-grown events at Silverstone and Donington, winning a few trophies along the way. 'BF 4025' comes complete with invoices, old MOTs and photos of the restoration. Having had a freshly overhauled rear axle at the cost of c.£2,000 available by separate negosation is a luggage truck and selection of spares.
This immaculately-presented AX was apparently the property of a Lieutenant Colonel F E Manning back in 1961, and subsequently formed part of the Dennis Sharpe private col...morelection for some 30 years before being offered for sale through Christie's in March 2003. Unsold it then passed to Orchid Cars from whom it was purchased by the previous owner, who set about its restoration. The vendor acquired the Renault in 2006 and completed the refurbishment by overhauling the steering box, radiator, magneto and commissioning a new bent ash hood frame and hood, and stainless steel exhaust, all to original specification plus a re-trimmed interior. The AX has since completed a variety of runs to France (achieving up to 425 miles in a week) and Germany, as well as such home-grown events at Silverstone and Donington, winning a few trophies along the way. 'BF 4025' comes complete with invoices, old MOTs and photos of the restoration. Having had a freshly overhauled rear axle at the cost of c.£2,000 available by separate negosation is a luggage truck and selection of spares.

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1971 Porsche 911 T Sportomatic

Lot # 15 (Sale Order: 15 of 122)      

- A very rare Sportomatic 911 in a classic and striking colour combination - Recorded expenditure includes nearly £4,000 worth of bodywork rejuvenation in 2010 and a gearbox overhaul in 2011 - First registered in the UK in April 1971 and featuring previous MOT certificates from 1997 plus some maintenance invoices This early Porsche 911 was first registered in England on April 15th 1971. Finished in a wonderful period colour, the body had significant repairs carried out to it in 2010, as stated by the invoice for nearly £4,000 from a body repair company in Adlington, Cheshire. Further improvements were carried out in 2011 by a company in Stockport, Cheshire when they overhauled the Sportomatic gearbox and fitted a new clutch. The cost of this work was just under £3,500 and the 84,500 miles indicated on the odometer would suggest this work was carried out less than a thousand miles ago. There are several previous MOT certificates on file dated between 1997 and 2013 and the current MOT is due to expire in October 2017. Reported by the vendor to have "good" paintwork and interior, and a freshly refurbished set of original Fuchs wheels, this is a smart looking 911 with its RS style front spoiler and fetching orange hue.
- A very rare Sportomatic 911 in a classic and striking colour combination - Recorded expenditure includes nearly £4,000 worth of bodywork rejuvenation in 2010 and a...more gearbox overhaul in 2011 - First registered in the UK in April 1971 and featuring previous MOT certificates from 1997 plus some maintenance invoices This early Porsche 911 was first registered in England on April 15th 1971. Finished in a wonderful period colour, the body had significant repairs carried out to it in 2010, as stated by the invoice for nearly £4,000 from a body repair company in Adlington, Cheshire. Further improvements were carried out in 2011 by a company in Stockport, Cheshire when they overhauled the Sportomatic gearbox and fitted a new clutch. The cost of this work was just under £3,500 and the 84,500 miles indicated on the odometer would suggest this work was carried out less than a thousand miles ago. There are several previous MOT certificates on file dated between 1997 and 2013 and the current MOT is due to expire in October 2017. Reported by the vendor to have "good" paintwork and interior, and a freshly refurbished set of original Fuchs wheels, this is a smart looking 911 with its RS style front spoiler and fetching orange hue.

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1962 Mercedes-Benz 190 SL

Lot # 16 (Sale Order: 16 of 122)      

- 1 of only 562 right-hand drive examples made (from a total production run of 25,881) - Two owners over the past twenty-seven years and resident in Spain for much of that time - Uprated with Twin Weber carburettors (original Solex ones retained), Black leather upholstery and Black mohair hood The 190SL was introduced in 1955 - the year Mercedes swept all before it on the Mille Miglia with the 300SLR. Indeed, the graceful, new two-door, convertible grand tourer was sold alongside the road-going version of the SLR - the 300SL - whose styling it strongly resembled. In fact, the underpinnings of the two cars were quite different and, while the 300SL had a purpose-built tubular spaceframe (W198), its smaller sibling was built on a shortened version of the 'Ponton' saloon (W121) platform, which was of monocoque construction. The 190SL also boasted an all-new engine - an over-square SOHC straight-four unit of 1897cc that produced some 120bhp, which was sufficient to propel the car to a maximum speed of 112mph. The engine was coupled to a manual four-speed gearbox. The suspension comprised double wishbones and coil springs at the front and a coil-sprung swing axle at the rear. Steering was by recirculating ball and braking by power-assisted drums all round. Built to the highest standards and among the quickest comparable cars of the time, the 190SL featured a well-appointed cockpit, notable comfort for its occupants and relatively generous luggage space. Under the circumstances, even the steep asking price of £2,693 did nothing to deter purchasers. Options included a third seat placed transversely behind the front ones which was big enough to carry an adult. The 190SL continued in production until 1963, when both it and the 300SL were replaced by the 230SL (W113). By this time some 25,881 190SLs had been produced (just over two percent of which were to right-hand drive specification). One of just 562 190SLs built to right-hand drive specification, this particular example - chassis number 23629 - has been UK registered since August 1st 1976. Retained by its previous keeper, George Fisher Esq., for twenty-four years (1990-2014), the Mercedes-Benz was resident in both Scotland and Southern Spain during that time. Inspected by T&T Technical Services of Edinburgh during October 1995 on Mr Fisher's behalf, their report read as follows: 'The bodywork of the vehicle was found to be in first class condition with no evidence of excessive corrosion or perforation. We were unable to detect any extensive repairs which had been carried out to the bodywork and, in our opinion, it would appear that this vehicle is totally original and in as near perfect condition as is possible for a vehicle of this age. The paintwork was also in very good condition although it had, at some time in the past, been re-sprayed but to a very high standard . . . Apart from a slight oil leak from the rear of the engine the mechanical components and vehicle undercarriage were in original and undamaged condition. It is our opinion that this vehicle is as near original as it is possible for a vehicle of this type to be and from all accounts it appears to be totally original and has not been restored'. Doubtless aided by its sojourn in sunnier climes, the 190SL remains highly presentable some twenty-two years later. Entering the current ownership during 2014, the Mercedes-Benz has since benefited from the addition of twin Weber 40 DCOE carburettors (though, the original Solex ones have been retained should a new owner wish to reinstate them). Decidedly rare in right-hand drive guise, this stylish 190SL is offered for sale with owner's manual (1968 reprint), sundry paperwork, the aforementioned T&T Technical Services report and MOT certificate valid until 22nd November 2017.
- 1 of only 562 right-hand drive examples made (from a total production run of 25,881) - Two owners over the past twenty-seven years and resident in Spain for much o...moref that time - Uprated with Twin Weber carburettors (original Solex ones retained), Black leather upholstery and Black mohair hood The 190SL was introduced in 1955 - the year Mercedes swept all before it on the Mille Miglia with the 300SLR. Indeed, the graceful, new two-door, convertible grand tourer was sold alongside the road-going version of the SLR - the 300SL - whose styling it strongly resembled. In fact, the underpinnings of the two cars were quite different and, while the 300SL had a purpose-built tubular spaceframe (W198), its smaller sibling was built on a shortened version of the 'Ponton' saloon (W121) platform, which was of monocoque construction. The 190SL also boasted an all-new engine - an over-square SOHC straight-four unit of 1897cc that produced some 120bhp, which was sufficient to propel the car to a maximum speed of 112mph. The engine was coupled to a manual four-speed gearbox. The suspension comprised double wishbones and coil springs at the front and a coil-sprung swing axle at the rear. Steering was by recirculating ball and braking by power-assisted drums all round. Built to the highest standards and among the quickest comparable cars of the time, the 190SL featured a well-appointed cockpit, notable comfort for its occupants and relatively generous luggage space. Under the circumstances, even the steep asking price of £2,693 did nothing to deter purchasers. Options included a third seat placed transversely behind the front ones which was big enough to carry an adult. The 190SL continued in production until 1963, when both it and the 300SL were replaced by the 230SL (W113). By this time some 25,881 190SLs had been produced (just over two percent of which were to right-hand drive specification). One of just 562 190SLs built to right-hand drive specification, this particular example - chassis number 23629 - has been UK registered since August 1st 1976. Retained by its previous keeper, George Fisher Esq., for twenty-four years (1990-2014), the Mercedes-Benz was resident in both Scotland and Southern Spain during that time. Inspected by T&T Technical Services of Edinburgh during October 1995 on Mr Fisher's behalf, their report read as follows: 'The bodywork of the vehicle was found to be in first class condition with no evidence of excessive corrosion or perforation. We were unable to detect any extensive repairs which had been carried out to the bodywork and, in our opinion, it would appear that this vehicle is totally original and in as near perfect condition as is possible for a vehicle of this age. The paintwork was also in very good condition although it had, at some time in the past, been re-sprayed but to a very high standard . . . Apart from a slight oil leak from the rear of the engine the mechanical components and vehicle undercarriage were in original and undamaged condition. It is our opinion that this vehicle is as near original as it is possible for a vehicle of this type to be and from all accounts it appears to be totally original and has not been restored'. Doubtless aided by its sojourn in sunnier climes, the 190SL remains highly presentable some twenty-two years later. Entering the current ownership during 2014, the Mercedes-Benz has since benefited from the addition of twin Weber 40 DCOE carburettors (though, the original Solex ones have been retained should a new owner wish to reinstate them). Decidedly rare in right-hand drive guise, this stylish 190SL is offered for sale with owner's manual (1968 reprint), sundry paperwork, the aforementioned T&T Technical Services report and MOT certificate valid until 22nd November 2017.

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1963 Jaguar E-Type 3.8 Roadster

Lot # 17 (Sale Order: 17 of 122)      

PLEASE NOTE: The vendor has forwarded us a copy of this lot's JDHT Certificate which shows that it was built on 11th September 1963 and originally finished in Pale Primrose Yellow with Black leather upholstery and a Black hood. Dispatched to Jaguar Cars, New York, USA early the following month, the E-Type was first owned by a Mr B.D. Lowe. The Certificate also confirms that the Roadster boasts 'matching' chassis, engine and body numbers. - Unusually original Series 1 3.8 Roadster right down its factory installed body number plaque and carburettor sequence tags etc - Currently displaying an unwarranted but not inconceivable 22,400 miles - Recently repatriated from a Massachusetts barn. Running and driving but in need of recommissioning and / or restoration Famously launched at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show, the Jaguar E-Type created a furore. Its combination of supercar performance, superb styling and a low price tag left rivals reeling and customers clamouring. While, early sportscar racing success at the hands of Graham Hill and Roy Salvadori amongst others helped cement its reputation. Built as a monocoque with a front sub-frame to cradle the engine, the model's combination of all-round independent suspension (torsion-bar front / coil-sprung rear) rack and pinion steering and four-wheel disc brakes gave it excellent roadholding and handling capabilities. Fed by triple SU HD8 carburettors and topped with a 'straight port' DOHC cylinder head, its indomitable 3781cc straight-six engine was quoted as developing some 265bhp and 260lbft of torque. Allied to a four-speed Moss gearbox (with synchromesh on 2nd, 3rd and 4th), it reputedly enabled the low-slung two-seater to sprint from 0-60mph in 6.9 seconds and onto 150mph. While any E-type roadster is desirable, the lithesome free-revving 3.8 litre cars enjoy a particularly exalted status. Dating from early in the production cycle before Jaguar responded to popular demand for greater comfort and refinement, they arguably represent the automotive icon in its purest form. Supplied new to America, this particular example - chassis 880134 - has only recently been repatriated from a Massachusetts barn. Among the most original left-hand drive E-Type 3.8 Roadsters that we have encountered, the two-seater pleasingly retains its factory-fitted body number plaque, engine and carburetor positioning tags! Although, the present odometer reading of 22,341 miles cannot be warranted it is lent some credence by the lack of wear to the Black leather upholstery and camshaft cover / cylinder head nuts etc. Indeed, renowned marque specialists XK Engineering of Coventry believe that the car's front suspension has yet to be apart since leaving Browns Lane. Running and driving but not on the road for the past dozen years or so, the Jaguar is ripe for recommissioning and using 'as is' or as the basis of a concours standard restoration. The Black mohair hood has self-evidently been renewed at some stage and the Primrose Yellow paintwork has plenty of age to it but from what we could gather chassis 880134 seems to be free from any major structural corrosion. Something of a 'timewarp', this delightful E-Type 3.8 Roadster is worthy of close inspection.
PLEASE NOTE: The vendor has forwarded us a copy of this lot's JDHT Certificate which shows that it was built on 11th September 1963 and originally finished in Pale Primro...morese Yellow with Black leather upholstery and a Black hood. Dispatched to Jaguar Cars, New York, USA early the following month, the E-Type was first owned by a Mr B.D. Lowe. The Certificate also confirms that the Roadster boasts 'matching' chassis, engine and body numbers. - Unusually original Series 1 3.8 Roadster right down its factory installed body number plaque and carburettor sequence tags etc - Currently displaying an unwarranted but not inconceivable 22,400 miles - Recently repatriated from a Massachusetts barn. Running and driving but in need of recommissioning and / or restoration Famously launched at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show, the Jaguar E-Type created a furore. Its combination of supercar performance, superb styling and a low price tag left rivals reeling and customers clamouring. While, early sportscar racing success at the hands of Graham Hill and Roy Salvadori amongst others helped cement its reputation. Built as a monocoque with a front sub-frame to cradle the engine, the model's combination of all-round independent suspension (torsion-bar front / coil-sprung rear) rack and pinion steering and four-wheel disc brakes gave it excellent roadholding and handling capabilities. Fed by triple SU HD8 carburettors and topped with a 'straight port' DOHC cylinder head, its indomitable 3781cc straight-six engine was quoted as developing some 265bhp and 260lbft of torque. Allied to a four-speed Moss gearbox (with synchromesh on 2nd, 3rd and 4th), it reputedly enabled the low-slung two-seater to sprint from 0-60mph in 6.9 seconds and onto 150mph. While any E-type roadster is desirable, the lithesome free-revving 3.8 litre cars enjoy a particularly exalted status. Dating from early in the production cycle before Jaguar responded to popular demand for greater comfort and refinement, they arguably represent the automotive icon in its purest form. Supplied new to America, this particular example - chassis 880134 - has only recently been repatriated from a Massachusetts barn. Among the most original left-hand drive E-Type 3.8 Roadsters that we have encountered, the two-seater pleasingly retains its factory-fitted body number plaque, engine and carburetor positioning tags! Although, the present odometer reading of 22,341 miles cannot be warranted it is lent some credence by the lack of wear to the Black leather upholstery and camshaft cover / cylinder head nuts etc. Indeed, renowned marque specialists XK Engineering of Coventry believe that the car's front suspension has yet to be apart since leaving Browns Lane. Running and driving but not on the road for the past dozen years or so, the Jaguar is ripe for recommissioning and using 'as is' or as the basis of a concours standard restoration. The Black mohair hood has self-evidently been renewed at some stage and the Primrose Yellow paintwork has plenty of age to it but from what we could gather chassis 880134 seems to be free from any major structural corrosion. Something of a 'timewarp', this delightful E-Type 3.8 Roadster is worthy of close inspection.

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1967 Volkswagen Kombi Riviera Camper Van

Lot # 18 (Sale Order: 18 of 122)      

- One previous owner in USA - Imported to UK in 2003 and then comprehensively restored by Wolfsburg VWs - Featured in VolksWorld magazine in 2004, Teak interior Volkswagen Type 2 camper vans are not common or garden fare, they are a lifestyle on wheels, beloved by generations of all manner of outdoor-oriented folk from hippies to surfers and those who simply enjoy, well, camping. They exude character in a way modern people carriers can only dream of and will continue to appreciate in value. All this and more was what led the vendor to go searching for a Splitscreen example to enjoy with his wife and baby boy. An advert by Wolfsburg VWs - Type 2 Specialists caught his eye back in 2003 and a call revealed they had imported 'HCK 101E' from San Diego and were in the process of comprehensively restoring it. It turned out to be a left-hand drive, rust-free, 1967 1500 van with Riviera camper conversion that had had just one American owner from new, and came with all its original paperwork - it was exactly what the vendor was looking for and so has owned ever since. Wolfsburg left no stone unturned - all the mechanical components received attention, from engine to gearbox and steering to brakes etc. The body was treated to a bare metal respray in Pearl White and the interior was completely refurbished in oak-veneered board (in place of the original cheap veneered plywood) and Red upholstery. Westfalia-style roof racks were affixed to the top and an up-to-date sound system cunningly installed below the facia. The result was clearly stunning and suitably enthusiastically reported upon in the January 2004 issue of Volksworld magazine. These days the vendor classes the bodywork, paintwork, interior trim, flat-four engine and four-speed manual gearbox as all being in 'good' condition, while the odometer currently displays an unwarranted 85,700 miles. Splitscreen Type 2 Vee Dubs with just two owners from new are a major rarity - especially in this condition.
- One previous owner in USA - Imported to UK in 2003 and then comprehensively restored by Wolfsburg VWs - Featured in VolksWorld magazine in 2004, Teak interior...more Volkswagen Type 2 camper vans are not common or garden fare, they are a lifestyle on wheels, beloved by generations of all manner of outdoor-oriented folk from hippies to surfers and those who simply enjoy, well, camping. They exude character in a way modern people carriers can only dream of and will continue to appreciate in value. All this and more was what led the vendor to go searching for a Splitscreen example to enjoy with his wife and baby boy. An advert by Wolfsburg VWs - Type 2 Specialists caught his eye back in 2003 and a call revealed they had imported 'HCK 101E' from San Diego and were in the process of comprehensively restoring it. It turned out to be a left-hand drive, rust-free, 1967 1500 van with Riviera camper conversion that had had just one American owner from new, and came with all its original paperwork - it was exactly what the vendor was looking for and so has owned ever since. Wolfsburg left no stone unturned - all the mechanical components received attention, from engine to gearbox and steering to brakes etc. The body was treated to a bare metal respray in Pearl White and the interior was completely refurbished in oak-veneered board (in place of the original cheap veneered plywood) and Red upholstery. Westfalia-style roof racks were affixed to the top and an up-to-date sound system cunningly installed below the facia. The result was clearly stunning and suitably enthusiastically reported upon in the January 2004 issue of Volksworld magazine. These days the vendor classes the bodywork, paintwork, interior trim, flat-four engine and four-speed manual gearbox as all being in 'good' condition, while the odometer currently displays an unwarranted 85,700 miles. Splitscreen Type 2 Vee Dubs with just two owners from new are a major rarity - especially in this condition.

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1949 Bentley MK VI H.J. Mulliner Saloon

Lot # 19 (Sale Order: 19 of 122)      

Introduced in 1946, the MKVI was Bentley's first post-war model. Aimed at the emerging 'owner-driver' luxury car market, the newcomer was closely based on the 1939 MKV (of which only fifteen were produced). Built around a massive cruciform-braced chassis with independent front suspension and a leaf-sprung 'live' rear axle, it was fitted with a freshly developed 4257cc OISE (overhead inlet side exhaust valve) straight-six engine mated to a four-speed manual gearbox. Capable of over 100mph when clad in the factory's understated 'standard steel saloon' coachwork, the MKVI quickly developed a reputation for being a refined yet responsive drive. However, despite the excellence of the 'basic' car, there remained a core of marque enthusiasts who found its styling too anonymous. Known for the quality and elegance of its renderings, H.J. Mulliner clothed some 307 MKVI chassis. Deservedly popular, the London coachbuilder's design number 7059 - a handsome four-door six-light saloon with semi-razor edge lines - accounted for some 125 sales. Built to Works Order Number 1040, chassis B22EY was then dispatched to H.J. Mulliner to become one of the 125. Road registered by Worcestershire County Council as 'HUY 53' in July 1949, the Bentley changed hands several times thereafter before being extensively restored during the 1980s. Entering the current family ownership at the end of that decade, the MKVI has been sparingly used over the past twenty-eight years but is understood to have been kept in good running order (its late owner was a talented engineer and former board member of Rolls-Royce). Treated to a new exhaust, fuel system overhaul and replacement water pump during the last six months, 'HUY 53' is summed-up by the seller as 'a sound and usable car which would benefit from some cosmetic work and general fettling'. Offered for sale with a history file and MOT certificate valid until July 2017.
Introduced in 1946, the MKVI was Bentley's first post-war model. Aimed at the emerging 'owner-driver' luxury car market, the newcomer was closely based on the 1939 MKV (o...moref which only fifteen were produced). Built around a massive cruciform-braced chassis with independent front suspension and a leaf-sprung 'live' rear axle, it was fitted with a freshly developed 4257cc OISE (overhead inlet side exhaust valve) straight-six engine mated to a four-speed manual gearbox. Capable of over 100mph when clad in the factory's understated 'standard steel saloon' coachwork, the MKVI quickly developed a reputation for being a refined yet responsive drive. However, despite the excellence of the 'basic' car, there remained a core of marque enthusiasts who found its styling too anonymous. Known for the quality and elegance of its renderings, H.J. Mulliner clothed some 307 MKVI chassis. Deservedly popular, the London coachbuilder's design number 7059 - a handsome four-door six-light saloon with semi-razor edge lines - accounted for some 125 sales. Built to Works Order Number 1040, chassis B22EY was then dispatched to H.J. Mulliner to become one of the 125. Road registered by Worcestershire County Council as 'HUY 53' in July 1949, the Bentley changed hands several times thereafter before being extensively restored during the 1980s. Entering the current family ownership at the end of that decade, the MKVI has been sparingly used over the past twenty-eight years but is understood to have been kept in good running order (its late owner was a talented engineer and former board member of Rolls-Royce). Treated to a new exhaust, fuel system overhaul and replacement water pump during the last six months, 'HUY 53' is summed-up by the seller as 'a sound and usable car which would benefit from some cosmetic work and general fettling'. Offered for sale with a history file and MOT certificate valid until July 2017.

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1923 Morris Oxford 'Bullnose' Tourer

Lot # 20 (Sale Order: 20 of 122)      

This delightful-looking Bullnose' Tourer was the subject of an earlier restoration in c.1981, and comes complete with photos of the work carried out, as well as a large history file that includes: the original instruction book, brown log book, various invoices, plus a collection of old tax discs and MOTs. It is believed the venerable Morris featured in the House of Elliot' TV programme and its characterful presentation includes period badges and various running board-mounted accessories. The model of Bullnose' offered broke cover in September 1918. It was longer and stronger than its predecessor and capable of transporting up to five passengers. Initially it was powered by a 1548cc engine manufactured by the British branch of Hotchkiss. This was increased in capacity to 1802cc during 1923. The Oxford name reflected the city in which the car was built and the Bullnose' moniker stemmed from the distinctive rounded top of the model's radiator.
This delightful-looking Bullnose' Tourer was the subject of an earlier restoration in c.1981, and comes complete with photos of the work carried out, as well as a large h...moreistory file that includes: the original instruction book, brown log book, various invoices, plus a collection of old tax discs and MOTs. It is believed the venerable Morris featured in the House of Elliot' TV programme and its characterful presentation includes period badges and various running board-mounted accessories. The model of Bullnose' offered broke cover in September 1918. It was longer and stronger than its predecessor and capable of transporting up to five passengers. Initially it was powered by a 1548cc engine manufactured by the British branch of Hotchkiss. This was increased in capacity to 1802cc during 1923. The Oxford name reflected the city in which the car was built and the Bullnose' moniker stemmed from the distinctive rounded top of the model's radiator.

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1919 Ford Model T Tourer

Lot # 21 (Sale Order: 21 of 122)      

ST 1369' vacated the Rouge plant, Detroit in kit form on October 15, 1919 and was assembled in Trafford Park, Manchester - it was one of the first Model Ts to have electric starting. Prior to the current ownership it was the property of the Tolman family of racing car and transporter fame, following which it required a full overhaul of the engine and transmission, which was carried out in 1995 by the T Shop for £1,700. It has since been used four-five times per annum without problem, has won many awards, and been employed regularly by the vendor as a tender vehicle for London to Brighton Veteran Runs. His bills, including the purchase price and all subsequent costs. Finished in Blue and trimmed in Black, this delightful T comes complete with hood, running-board-mounted petrol can and large history file including invoices and MOTs from 1993 to 2007.
ST 1369' vacated the Rouge plant, Detroit in kit form on October 15, 1919 and was assembled in Trafford Park, Manchester - it was one of the first Model Ts to have electr...moreic starting. Prior to the current ownership it was the property of the Tolman family of racing car and transporter fame, following which it required a full overhaul of the engine and transmission, which was carried out in 1995 by the T Shop for £1,700. It has since been used four-five times per annum without problem, has won many awards, and been employed regularly by the vendor as a tender vehicle for London to Brighton Veteran Runs. His bills, including the purchase price and all subsequent costs. Finished in Blue and trimmed in Black, this delightful T comes complete with hood, running-board-mounted petrol can and large history file including invoices and MOTs from 1993 to 2007.

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1967 Land Rover 109 Series IIA

Lot # 22 (Sale Order: 22 of 122)      

- Two farmer owners from new and just 53,400 miles - Complete with working Capstan front winch and PTO underneath - Still has its grey elephant hide interior in "fantastic" condition In 1967 Land Rover introduced the 2.6 litre, 6-cylinder petrol engine for the 109" models. LKJ 217F must be one of, if not the earliest, road going example available anywhere, having had only two farmer owners from new. The vendor advises the low recorded mileage of 53,400 miles is genuine and that it comes complete with working Capstan front winch and PTO underneath. To the interior it retains its grey elephant hide which is said to be in "fantastic condition". A detailed history file contains a mint and original folder supplied by Caffyns Ltd with an original sales document for the price of £879 and 13 shillings, original buff log book, old mot certificates and a very interesting written history. It details how the original owner used to carry his pigs to market in the rear, with their piglets travelling on the roof with a large roof rack as an open-air enclosure! This is why the protective roof covering is fitted, to prevent any indentations on the roof! Dry stored for many years, this rare 6-cylinder Land Rover has just had all new brake cylinders and shoes fitted and is now supplied with MoT until the end of February 2018. Surely a must for any Land Rover collector.
- Two farmer owners from new and just 53,400 miles - Complete with working Capstan front winch and PTO underneath - Still has its grey elephant hide interior in...more "fantastic" condition In 1967 Land Rover introduced the 2.6 litre, 6-cylinder petrol engine for the 109" models. LKJ 217F must be one of, if not the earliest, road going example available anywhere, having had only two farmer owners from new. The vendor advises the low recorded mileage of 53,400 miles is genuine and that it comes complete with working Capstan front winch and PTO underneath. To the interior it retains its grey elephant hide which is said to be in "fantastic condition". A detailed history file contains a mint and original folder supplied by Caffyns Ltd with an original sales document for the price of £879 and 13 shillings, original buff log book, old mot certificates and a very interesting written history. It details how the original owner used to carry his pigs to market in the rear, with their piglets travelling on the roof with a large roof rack as an open-air enclosure! This is why the protective roof covering is fitted, to prevent any indentations on the roof! Dry stored for many years, this rare 6-cylinder Land Rover has just had all new brake cylinders and shoes fitted and is now supplied with MoT until the end of February 2018. Surely a must for any Land Rover collector.

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1996 Mercedes-Benz SL 320

Lot # 23 (Sale Order: 23 of 122)      

- Purchased by the current lady owner in 1999 at around 4,000 miles, and reportedly garaged when not driven - The odometer records just 33,800 miles from new and believed to have every previous MOT certificate - Finished in a desirable colour combination of dark blue-black paintwork with cream leather This beautifully coloured SL320 has dark blue-black paintwork and a cream leather interior, and was first registered on August 1st 1996. It was purchased by the lady owner in 1999 for around £40,000, at which time the odometer recorded just 4,000 miles. Used sparingly and apparently for the odd foray into Europe, the odometer currently displays just 33,800 miles, and we have been informed that the car has always been garaged alongside the vendor's interesting collection of cars when not in use. Therefore, it is of no surprise that the vendor describes the car as having an 'excellent' engine, gearbox, and interior, and 'very good' paintwork. These SL's are extremely usable modern-classics, and with such a low recorded mileage, desirable colours, and popular engine size, this particular example should provide a lot of pleasure to the next owner.
- Purchased by the current lady owner in 1999 at around 4,000 miles, and reportedly garaged when not driven - The odometer records just 33,800 miles from new and bel...moreieved to have every previous MOT certificate - Finished in a desirable colour combination of dark blue-black paintwork with cream leather This beautifully coloured SL320 has dark blue-black paintwork and a cream leather interior, and was first registered on August 1st 1996. It was purchased by the lady owner in 1999 for around £40,000, at which time the odometer recorded just 4,000 miles. Used sparingly and apparently for the odd foray into Europe, the odometer currently displays just 33,800 miles, and we have been informed that the car has always been garaged alongside the vendor's interesting collection of cars when not in use. Therefore, it is of no surprise that the vendor describes the car as having an 'excellent' engine, gearbox, and interior, and 'very good' paintwork. These SL's are extremely usable modern-classics, and with such a low recorded mileage, desirable colours, and popular engine size, this particular example should provide a lot of pleasure to the next owner.

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1974 Aston Martin V8

Lot # 24 (Sale Order: 24 of 122)      

Aston Martin's long-awaited V8 finally appeared in 1969. It was initially known as the DBS V8, but later re-dubbed simply, 'V8'. Retrospectively known as the Series 3, the redesigned model phased-in during July 1973 was a response to concerns over forthcoming US emission regulations. Marking a switch from Bosch fuel-injection to quad twin-choke 42mm Webers, the newcomer was visually distinguished by an enlarged air intake, elongated bonnet scoop and new rear window panel. Utilising the same steel platform chassis complete with independent double-wishbone front suspension, Watts linkage-located de Dion rear axle, power assisted rack-and-pinion steering and four-wheel disc brakes as its predecessor, the luxury GT now benefited from improved engine and transmission cooling and a revised petrol tank design. Other improvements included a revamped 2+2 interior with revised seats and reorganised switchgear. Developing some 310bhp, its cleaner-running 5340cc DOHC V8 engine still made for a prodigiously fast motorcar. Indeed, the September 1973 issue of Autocar magazine recorded 0-60mph in 6.2 seconds and 146mph flat out aboard a Series 3 with automatic transmission. With production running from July 1973 to December 1974 and then Spring 1976 to October 1978, just 967 Series 3 cars were made all told. This 'meticulously maintained' Series 3 V8 comes with Metallic Green paintwork, Cream-coloured leather interior, factory-fitted manual transmission and A/C (presently inoperative). Entering the current ownership during 2000, 'BVU 476N' has had only 5 former keepers, currently displays a total of 96,500 miles, and has benefited from new stainless steel exhaust manifolds (2001) and battery (2016). The vendor presently grades the bodywork, paintwork, engine and transmission as 'very good' and the interior trim as 'good', and is offering the Aston complete with service book containing 22 stamps from Kensington-based independent marque specialist Ian Mason, original instruction book, workshop manual, large collection of invoices, 32 old MOTs and one valid to February 7th 2018. Just three 1974 Aston Martin V8s are seemingly registered with the DVLA at present of which this is the only non-SORN'd example.
Aston Martin's long-awaited V8 finally appeared in 1969. It was initially known as the DBS V8, but later re-dubbed simply, 'V8'. Retrospectively known as the Series 3, th...moree redesigned model phased-in during July 1973 was a response to concerns over forthcoming US emission regulations. Marking a switch from Bosch fuel-injection to quad twin-choke 42mm Webers, the newcomer was visually distinguished by an enlarged air intake, elongated bonnet scoop and new rear window panel. Utilising the same steel platform chassis complete with independent double-wishbone front suspension, Watts linkage-located de Dion rear axle, power assisted rack-and-pinion steering and four-wheel disc brakes as its predecessor, the luxury GT now benefited from improved engine and transmission cooling and a revised petrol tank design. Other improvements included a revamped 2+2 interior with revised seats and reorganised switchgear. Developing some 310bhp, its cleaner-running 5340cc DOHC V8 engine still made for a prodigiously fast motorcar. Indeed, the September 1973 issue of Autocar magazine recorded 0-60mph in 6.2 seconds and 146mph flat out aboard a Series 3 with automatic transmission. With production running from July 1973 to December 1974 and then Spring 1976 to October 1978, just 967 Series 3 cars were made all told. This 'meticulously maintained' Series 3 V8 comes with Metallic Green paintwork, Cream-coloured leather interior, factory-fitted manual transmission and A/C (presently inoperative). Entering the current ownership during 2000, 'BVU 476N' has had only 5 former keepers, currently displays a total of 96,500 miles, and has benefited from new stainless steel exhaust manifolds (2001) and battery (2016). The vendor presently grades the bodywork, paintwork, engine and transmission as 'very good' and the interior trim as 'good', and is offering the Aston complete with service book containing 22 stamps from Kensington-based independent marque specialist Ian Mason, original instruction book, workshop manual, large collection of invoices, 32 old MOTs and one valid to February 7th 2018. Just three 1974 Aston Martin V8s are seemingly registered with the DVLA at present of which this is the only non-SORN'd example.

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1963 Jaguar MK II 3.8 Litre

Lot # 25 (Sale Order: 25 of 122)      

Featuring notably slimmer roof pillars than its MKI forebear, the immortal Jaguar MKII was as airy on the inside as it was elegant on the outside. Its monocoque bodyshell was equipped with independent coil-sprung front suspension and a well located live rear axle, 12-inch disc brakes all round and recirculating ball steering. The model could be specified with a 2.4, 3.4 or 3.8-litre version of Jaguar's race-proved, DOHC inline, six-cylinder XK engine. The interior was quintessentially British with its sumptuous leather-covered seats, polished wood facia and door cappings, comprehensive instrumentation and impressive row of auxiliary toggle switches. The attention to detail and build quality of the MKII were remarkable for the price. Equipped with the 220bhp 3.8-litre engine, the Jaguar was reputedly capable of sprinting to 60mph in 8.5 seconds and on to a top speed of 125mph. Some 30,141 3.8s were produced between 1959 and 1967. Finished in Dark Green with Tan leather upholstery, this particular example boasts a manual overdrive gearbox and chrome wire wheels. Purchased by the current keeper in 2012, it was the subject of a extensive restoration between 1997 and 2001. This included: a bare metal respray during which the colour was changed from the original Golden Sand; the engine was refurbished to standard specification; the original manual gearbox was replaced by a later all-synchromesh unit; the suspension was lowered and rebushed; power steering was added; the bumpers and rear lights were rechromed; the headlining, carpets, facia, wheels, tyres, spinners and radio were all renewed. More recently a Kenlowe fan, electronic ignition, new starter motor and custom header tank have been fitted. The vendor not surprisingly now regards the bodywork, paintwork, interior trim, engine and gearbox as all being in "very good order" and 'APG 401B' is offered with a fresh MOT certificate. A fine looking example of a great motorcar.
Featuring notably slimmer roof pillars than its MKI forebear, the immortal Jaguar MKII was as airy on the inside as it was elegant on the outside. Its monocoque bodyshell...more was equipped with independent coil-sprung front suspension and a well located live rear axle, 12-inch disc brakes all round and recirculating ball steering. The model could be specified with a 2.4, 3.4 or 3.8-litre version of Jaguar's race-proved, DOHC inline, six-cylinder XK engine. The interior was quintessentially British with its sumptuous leather-covered seats, polished wood facia and door cappings, comprehensive instrumentation and impressive row of auxiliary toggle switches. The attention to detail and build quality of the MKII were remarkable for the price. Equipped with the 220bhp 3.8-litre engine, the Jaguar was reputedly capable of sprinting to 60mph in 8.5 seconds and on to a top speed of 125mph. Some 30,141 3.8s were produced between 1959 and 1967. Finished in Dark Green with Tan leather upholstery, this particular example boasts a manual overdrive gearbox and chrome wire wheels. Purchased by the current keeper in 2012, it was the subject of a extensive restoration between 1997 and 2001. This included: a bare metal respray during which the colour was changed from the original Golden Sand; the engine was refurbished to standard specification; the original manual gearbox was replaced by a later all-synchromesh unit; the suspension was lowered and rebushed; power steering was added; the bumpers and rear lights were rechromed; the headlining, carpets, facia, wheels, tyres, spinners and radio were all renewed. More recently a Kenlowe fan, electronic ignition, new starter motor and custom header tank have been fitted. The vendor not surprisingly now regards the bodywork, paintwork, interior trim, engine and gearbox as all being in "very good order" and 'APG 401B' is offered with a fresh MOT certificate. A fine looking example of a great motorcar.

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