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The Corpus Christi Old Car Museum - Saturday Cars

The Corpus Christi Old Car Museum - Saturday Cars

Saturday, October 5, 2019  |  11:30 AM Central
Auction closed.
The Corpus Christi Old Car Museum - Saturday Cars

The Corpus Christi Old Car Museum - Saturday Cars

Saturday, October 5, 2019  |  11:30 AM Central
Auction closed.
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1947 Indian Chief Motorcycle

Lot # 101 (Sale Order: 1 of 106)      

1,210 cc air-cooled, side-valve V-Twin engine, sliding gear transmission with “jockey” tank side shift lever, coil-sprung front forks, dual plunger-type rear suspension, front and rear drum brakes; wheelbase: 60.5"
In production almost continuously from 1922 to the demise of its maker in 1953, the Indian Chief motorcycle remains an unqualified legend today. Known as Indian’s “Big Twin,” a larger and more powerful alternative to the smaller, more agile Scout, the Chief was essentially unchanged, yet carefully refined throughout the first half of its production run. Handsome and comfortable, the Chief was powered by a four-stroke, 42-degree V-Twin engine, initially displacing 1,000 cc from 1922 to 1928, with a 1,210 cc available for 1923-42 and 1946-48 and 1,300 cc for the final 1950-53 models. Significant changes for the entire Indian line for 1940 made the renowned Chief even more popular and more enjoyable to ride. A new frame design now featured an innovative dual plunger-type rear suspension, enhancing Indian’s well-deserved reputation for smoothness and excellent handling characteristics. In addition, handsomely skirted front and rear fenders first appeared in 1940, lending the sleek Art Deco-inspired profile view that remains most closely identified with Indian motorcycles and the Chief in particular today. Easily capable of reaching 85 miles per hour in stock form, the Chief delivered strong long-range cruising performance to match its character, easily hitting the all-important 100-mph mark with careful tuning. The 1947 Indian Chief offered here is simply a wonderful example of the marque’s flagship model line. Bearing a nice patina consistent with good maintenance, storage, and use, it remains nicely presented and complete overall. Featuring a good paint finish, this Chief includes a stylized Indian-head front marker lamp, abundant bright trim and rides on Dunlop tires. As offered, this classic Indian Chief will make a great addition to any worthy collection celebrating American motorcycling history or provide an excellent basis for a full concours-worthy restoration....more

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1938 Cadillac Series 75 Seven-Passenger Sedan

Lot # 102 (Sale Order: 2 of 106)      

346 cid L-head V-8 engine, 140 HP at 3,400 rpm, three-speed selective synchromesh manual transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, hydraulic four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase: 141 ¼”
With a young Bill Mitchell now heading the Cadillac styling studios under the direction of Harley Earl, the handsome new 1938 Cadillac models solidified General Motors’ position at the forefront of automotive design. In fact, by 1938, Cadillac was the undisputed king of luxury cars in America, by virtue of its industry-leading styling and renowned technical prowess. Additionally, the deep financial resources of its massive General Motors parent company helped ensure Cadillac not only survived, but thrived, during the challenging Great Depression years, outlasting such revered competitors as Franklin, Duesenberg, Marmon, Stutz and Pierce-Arrow. Featuring attractively streamlined basic styling cues, Cadillac’s model lines were organized for 1938 along five series. The V-12 Series 85 was dropped, leaving the V-8 Series 38-60, the new 38-60S Sixty Special, 38-65, and 38-75 and 38-90 V-16 lines. Series 70 and the Fisher-bodied Series 75 Specials were also discontinued, but a Convertible Sedan was added to Series 65. Mechanical updates for 1938 made the great Cadillac models even better than before, with sophistication, ease of operation and drivability second to none. Powering all but Series 90, Cadillac’s 346-cid V-8 engine delivered 135 horsepower and received a slight power boost to a 140-horsepower rating for the big Series 75 models. Sharing the longest 141 ¼-inch wheelbase chassis with the Series 90 V-16 line, Cadillac’s Series 75 models for 1938 were bodied exclusively by Fleetwood. The 1938 Cadillacs were introduced during October 1937, with nearly 25,000 produced for model year 1938 and just 1,902 of them from Series 75. This 1938 Cadillac Series 75 Seven-Passenger Sedan is a very well-presented example of Cadillac’s signature prewar model line, with the versatility offered by a pair of folding jump seats in the rear passenger compartment. Showing under 25,110 miles on the odometer and retaining an original-appearing interior and engine bay, this Series 75 clearly benefits from proper long-term care with a newer quality paint finish and restored exterior brightwork. Turn-signal lights have been added for added safety while touring. As one of Cadillac’s finest for 1938, this Fleetwood-bodied Series 75 Seven-Passenger Sedan is a very nice example, ready to show and enjoy....more

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1967 Austin Mini Moke

Lot # 103 (Sale Order: 3 of 106)      

998 cc BMC A-Series inline four-cylinder engine, 55 HP, four-speed manual front transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension, hydraulic four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase: 80"
The Mini Moke, so-named after a 19th Century Australian expression meaning “donkey” or “pack mule,” was based on the mechanical components and basic layout of the wildly successful Mini. It was originally conceived as a lightweight, air-transportable vehicle, stripped to its bare essentials and aimed at meeting British military requirements. Although the Moke was rejected by the Royal Army due to concerns over the Moke’s low ground clearance, BMC so completely believed in the Moke’s charming presence and remarkable utility that it began offering the Moke to the public in 1964. While UK production ended in 1968, the Moke continued to be produced in Australia and later by Cagiva in Portugal, with production eventually ending in 1992. Eventually, some 51,000 examples were built in total, with many finding favor with generations of farmers, linemen and ranchers for their toughness and utility. A number were also exported to Catalina Island, the Caribbean and the Seychelles, where their simplicity and chic, avant-garde attitude made them a mainstay of vacation life. The Moke even gained stardom on the small screen, with several appearances in TV’s “The Prisoner” series. A veteran of many shows, tours and classic events, this BMC Moke is particularly festive and offered in nice driver quality. In addition to a large horn affixed to the right-front fender, this Moke includes a folding canvas top, twin side-view mirrors attached to the windshield frame, auxiliary seat cushions and an aftermarket three-spoke steering wheel. While designed for military use, this Mini Moke is ready to enjoy and to carry you and your lucky friends on new adventures....more

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1957 BMW R69 Motorcycle

Lot # 104 (Sale Order: 4 of 106)      

590 cc air-cooled flat-twin engine, twin Bing carburetors, 35 HP at 6,800 RPM, four-speed manual gearbox, shaft drive, double-loop tubular steel frame, Earles front fork, rear trailing forks, front and rear drum brakes
In a clear demonstration of the value gained from careful evolution over revolution, Germany’s BMW commanded the medium-displacement motorcycle market of the 1950s and 1960s. Succeeding the R68 of 1951-55, the R69 continued with BMW’s renowned two-cylinder boxer-style engine and remains one of the finest and most collectible postwar motorcycles ever produced. The R69’s distinctive four-stroke, OHV boxer twin-cylinder engine produced 35 horsepower at 6,800 engine revolutions, with fuel delivery via twin Bing carburetors, Bosch magneto ignition and a six-volt electrical system. Visually, the R69 boxer engine can be quickly identified by the two ribs found on each valve cover, in contrast to most other BMW models of the same year range, which had five-rib side covers. A four-speed, foot-shift gearbox with single-disc clutch sent the R69’s power to the rear wheel with a driveshaft. The T69 chassis was of double-loop tubular steel construction with patented Earles-type front forks and swing-arm rear suspension including twin hydraulic shock absorbers. Both front and rear tires were 18 inches tall and 8-inch drum brakes provided stopping power. Robustly constructed and weighing 450 pounds dry, the BMW R69 delivered strong performance, being capable of exceeding 105 miles per hour, yet was quite economical, achieving better than 50 miles per gallon. The R69 was offered from 1955 to 1960, succeeded by the slightly faster and more-powerful R69S from 1960 to 1969. In addition to its commercial success, the R69 line is historic as the last line of BMW motorcycles produced in Munich, following BMW’s gradual shift of motorcycle production from Munich to Berlin beginning in 1966. All bike production had been entirely phased out of the Munich factory by the time the R69 models were phased out in 1969, making the R69 the last BMW motorcycle built at the original factory that opened back in 1923. According to renowned UK expert and author L.J.K. Setright’s book, “Bahnstormer: The Story of BMW Motorcycles,” just 2,819 examples of the original R69 were produced, including this very attractive early-production example from 1957, followed by 11,417 of the R69S. While capable of reaching about 100 miles per hour flat out – heady performance for the era, the R69 continues to enjoy strong collector and enthusiast demand in recognition of its uncanny combination of speed, comfort, silence and reliability. A true motorcycling icon by any standard, this rare first-generation 1957 BMW R69 is an essential part of any proper classic motorcycle collection....more

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1974 Suzuki RE-5 Motorcycle

Lot # 105 (Sale Order: 5 of 106)      

497 cc liquid-cooled, single-rotor Wankel engine, 61.9 HP at 6,500 RPM, five-speed gearbox, chain drive, hydraulic fork front suspension, rear coil-over shock absorbers, hydraulic brakes with twin floating-caliper discs front and drum rear; wheelbase: 1,500 mm (59”)
Developed by Dr. Felix Wankel, the rotary-type internal-combustion engine bearing his name was widely heralded during the 1960s and 1970s as a possible alternative to piston-type engines. Elegantly simple, the Wankel rotary offered high output from a far smaller engine displacement and lower weight. Motorcycle manufacturers were intrigued for obvious reasons, with the Hercules/DKW W2000 the first rotary-powered production motorcycle; however, soft sales limited production to just the 1974 model year. Other manufacturers offered rotary-powered models, including DKW, Norton and Van Veen. At the time, all four major Japanese motorcycle manufacturers either planned, or built prototypes, of rotary-powered motorcycles. Yamaha exhibited the twin-rotor RZ-201 at the Tokyo Motor Show in 1972, and both Honda and Kawasaki tested prototypes. Suzuki was most committed to development of a Wankel model, with years of research and development work leading to technical licensing of the concept from NSU in 1970. Suzuki’s Wankel research yielded 20 new patents covering machining processes and material plating techniques. Two years of prototype testing culminated in the launch of the RE-5 in 1974, with NASA astronaut Edgar Mitchell enlisted to introduce and endorse the new bike. A technical tour de force, the complex RE-5 included liquid- and oil-cooling for the engine, double-skinned exhaust pipes, CDI ignition and a complex engine-lubrication system including two separate oil pumps, with five control cables actuated by the throttle twist grip. Noted stylist Giorgetto Giugiaro designed the RE-5, including the cylindrical instrument cluster, taillight, and spherical signal lights. Two RE-5 models were produced, including the “M’ of 1975 and the ‘A’ for 1976 with less-radical styling. Generally smooth, the RE-5 engine produced outstanding torque and good fuel economy. Options included a full touring kit including a large full fairing incorporating lockable compartments and a windscreen, twin saddlebags and a large cargo rack mounting a lockable storage box. Some 6,000 RE-5s were produced from 1974 through 1977, but surviving examples are quite rare today. Equipped with the optional fairing, this 1974 Suzuki RE-5 was last Texas road-registered in 1987. Earlier in its lifetime, it was used for commuting to and from the former Kelly Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. A very interesting “garage find” example, this RE-5 shows under 30,000 indicated miles of use and, as offered, it appears to require extensive cleaning, detailing, and servicing prior to any contemplated road use after many years of storage indoors. Nonetheless, it is an example of advanced technology brought to production reality by Suzuki....more

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1974 BMW R90S Motorcycle

Lot # 106 (Sale Order: 6 of 106)      

898 cc air-cooled, four-stroke twin-cylinder “Boxer” engine, twin Dell’Orto 38mm carburetors, 67 HP, five-speed gearbox, shaft drive, tubular cradle frame with bolted-on rear subframe, hydraulic/spring front and rear forks, dual-disc front and rear drum brakes; wheelbase: 1,465 mm (57.7”)
While long revered as a maker of fast and well-engineered motorcycles, BMW suffered an identity crisis during the 1960s and reportedly once considered selling off its motorcycle division. The growing wave of fast, reliable Japanese motorcycles revolutionized the sport and by the time Honda released the game-changing CB 750 in 1970, it seemed the shift was complete and irreversible. That was until Bob Lutz, the Swiss American former GM Europe executive, joined BMW as Executive Vice President of Sales in 1971. A Honda CB 750 owner, Lutz railed against the stifling conservatism at BMW and campaigned for a large-displacement 900cc flagship bike from Munich to compete head-to-head with the renowned Honda, Kawasaki Z1, Norton Commando, Triumph/BSA 750 triples, Ducati 750SS and Moto-Guzzi V-7 Sport. In addition to the outstanding engineering and performance that were BMW hallmarks, Lutz demanded the new BMW “Superbike” look good too. Enter industrial stylist Hans Muth, who penned what remains one of the finest motorcycle designs of the postwar era, featuring a purposeful and aggressive, yet entirely rational design featuring a sleek café racer-style front fairing, seat, tailpiece and exhaust. A hand-painted two-tone color scheme provided further visual appeal. Designated R90S, the new BMW’s engineering was overseen by Hans-Gunter von der Marwitz, including twin front disc brakes, aluminum-alloy wheels, dual Dell’Orto carburetors, and a five-speed gearbox with shaft drive. BMW’s legendary “Boxer” twin engine was enlarged to 898 cc and developed 75 horsepower at 7,200 rpm. The R90S was an unqualified hit from launch and a revelation to ride, delivering exceptional performance with exacting relatively few demands of riders in return. Released for sale in 1974, the R90S was proven by Cycle World magazine with a then-sensational quarter mile run in just 13.50 seconds and a 123-mph top end. In a rolling start, the R90S was also capable of pulling away from Kawasaki’s vaunted 900cc Z1 at any speed, in any gear. Steady improvements during production included drilled front rotors, a disc rear brake, and a revised engine design in advance of the forthcoming R100 model, which superseded the R90S after 1976. Closing out the R90S chapter, British rider Reg Pridmore rode one to victory in the inaugural AMA Superbike Championship in 1976. Showing just 20,513 miles at the time of cataloguing, this 1974 BMW R90S is a definitive, later-production model with solid red paint and drilled front disc brakes yet retains the early-specification rear drum-type brake. Appearing virtually “as new,” it simply stands as a high-quality example of one of the most important motorcycles ever to come from BMW....more

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1978 Ducati 900 SD Darmah

Lot # 107 (Sale Order: 7 of 106)      

864 cc air-cooled, four-stroke V-twin engine, desmodromic valve control, twin Dell’Orto carburetors, 70 HP at 7,000 RPM, five-speed gearbox, tubular steel frame, front telescopic forks, adjustable rear coil-over shock absorbers, hydraulic twin-disc front, single-disc rear brakes; wheelbase: 1,550 mm (61”)
During the 1970s, most of the world’s top motorcycle manufacturers released an unending succession of faster, larger-displacement Superbikes capable of ever-increasing speeds with aggressive styling to match their performance. These two-wheeled monsters were often designed and built for racing homologation, or vice versa, with competition-inspired technologies trickling down to improve the performance and usability of each manufacturer’s road models. While aerodynamic improvements and larger front fairings improved top-speed potential, many riders still craved the “naked” bike, intended to be unencumbered, less complicated and lighter, these Superbikes of the 1970s are exemplified by the Ducati 900 SD Darmah. Derived from the legendary Italian marque’s all-out racing machines, the 900 SD Darmah continues to be sought-after as a good all-around performer with a unique presence, thanks to its Brembo disc brakes, Ceriani front forks, Campagnolo gold-finished wheels and Conti mufflers. Powering the 900 SD Darmah was Ducati’s latest 90-degree V-twin engine, developing some 70 horsepower. A much-improved development of the prior 860 GT, the 900 SD engine was a commercial success and later formed the basis for the even sportier 900 SSD. Renowned for its response and ability to reach high engine rpm, the 900 SD followed in Ducati tradtion with its desmodromic valvetrain system, designed by Dr. Fabio Taglioni, who spent most of his engineering career at Ducati. In fact, the 900 SD designation stood for “900 cc, Sport Desmo.” The 900 SD Darmah was so successful in fact, that Ducati commemorated it with the Sport 1000 Special Edition of 2007, produced in a limited run of 100 examples solely for the U.S. market. Featuring a discreet Café Racer-style front fairing and red paint finish, this 1978 Ducati 900 SD Darmah is a fine and very desirable example of this special Italian motorcycle, with fewer than 26,000 indicated miles of use at the time of cataloguing. Attractive throughout and clearly benefiting from good care and storage over its lifetime, this Ducati stands as one of the most-attractive and best-performing Superbikes ever sold to the public....more

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1978 Moto Guzzi Le Mans Mk I Motorcycle

Lot # 108 (Sale Order: 8 of 106)      

844 cc air-cooled OHV V-twin engine, twin Dell’Orto carburetors, 80 HP at 7,300 RPM, five-speed gearbox, shaft drive, twin telescopic front forks, twin adjustable rear shock absorbers, hydraulic twin-disc front, single-disc rear brakes with cross-drilled rotors; wheelbase: 1,470 mm (57.9”)
Long respected for its road models and international racing success, Moto Guzzi executives and staffers met the company’s takeover by Alejandro De Tomaso with mixed feelings, yet they continued to design produce some of its best models. One of the finest achievements of Lino Tonti, who joined Moto Guzzi as chief engineer in February 1967, was the 850 Le Mans, first released for sale in Europe during 1975. Not only one of the “classic” Moto Guzzi models so revered by today’s marque enthusiasts, the 850 Le Mans is widely regarded by many as the archetype of the late-1970s sporting Italian motorcycle. While quite similar to the prior 750 S3, the 850 Le Mans was a masterful blend of style, design and engineering prowess. Featuring Moto Guzzi’s classical longitudinally mounted V-twin engine design, the 850 Le Mans featured a displacement increase to 844 cc, an improved cylinder-head design with bigger valves, domed high-compression pistons and twin Dell’Orto carburetors. A five-speed gearbox and shaft-type final drive transmitted the power, rated at 80 peak horsepower at 7,300 engine revolutions. Aggressive “Café Racer” styling of the 850 Le Mans matched its provocative name and sporting nature, including the sport-type saddle, side covers, body-color fenders, low, narrow handlebars and minimalistic front fairing. Promotion of the new 850 Le Mans in the United States was predictably via top-echelon racing, with Mike Baldwin piloting one of these earthbound missiles to the model’s fist AMA Superbike victory at Loudon, New Hampshire in June 1976. Only some 7,000 examples of the original “Mk I” 850 Le Mans were built in all from 1975 through 1978, including a handful exported to the United States, followed by the more touring-oriented “Mk II” produced 1979-92. Highly desired by collectors, this “Mk I’ 1978 Moto Guzzi 850 Le Mans is simply a fine and well-preserved example of these iconic Italian Superbikes. Finished in sinister red and black livery, it is an original U.S.-specification example equipped with a sealed-beam headlamp protruding outward from the front of the fairing. Renowned as one of the best-handling motorcycles ever produced, it is sure to provide a thrilling ride and capture attention wherever it goes....more

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1955 Buick Century Riviera Hardtop

Lot # 109 (Sale Order: 9 of 106)      

322 cid OHV V-8 engine, 236 HP, automatic transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, hydraulic four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase: 122”
Buick traditionally occupied an enviable position within the GM hierarchy by selling prestigious, well-equipped, and profitable mid-to-upper level cars. By 1954, record calendar-year production and strong model-year production drove Buick to third place in American sale rankings, right behind high-volume Chevrolet and Ford. The newly released Century line-up contributed strongly to Buick’s remarkable 1950s success story. Reprising a nameplate first used between 1936 and 1942, the Century was Buick’s performance model line, combining the powerful 322 ‘Nailhead’ V-8 engine of the Roadmaster with the lightweight body and chassis of the Special. Power ratings for the Century were 200 and 236 horsepower for 1954 and 1955. A highly respected road car easily capable of freeway cruising at 100 mph, hence its name, the Century clearly foreshadowed the big engine/lightweight body formula of the “muscle car” era yet to come. Performance was so strong, in fact, that during a road test conducted by Motor Trend, the 236-horsepower 1955 Century out-accelerated even the mighty 300-HP Chrysler C-300! Passenger comfort was excellent as well, in keeping with the Century’s handsome exterior, replete with front-fender “Ventiports,” sweeping bodyside moldings, and front-bumper “Dagmar” bullets. This 1955 Buick Century is one of Buick’s most popular and collectible models for 1955 – the Riviera two-door hardtop. Formerly part of the Ed Hicks Collection, it continues to benefit nicely overall from an older complete, body-off restoration. This Century is exceptionally rare, being equipped with a factory in-trunk air-conditioning system, with the compressor swapped out for a modern-type unit to allow continued use. At the time of cataloguing, this highly desirable Buick had an approximate 82,100 miles of use indicated on the odometer. Other desirable features include an automatic transmission, power brakes, power steering, a “Sonomatic” AM radio and added seat belts. The engine bay and powerful ‘Nailhead’ V-8 engine are nicely finished and detailed, while the interior features an engine-turned dash appliqué and two-tone upholstery. As a Buick sale catalog once noted, “Drive the Century and you command thrills that set the pulse of even a sports car enthusiast to pounding.” This statement remains true today and is certainly exemplified by this Century....more

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1960 Austin-Healey 3000 Mark II BT7 Roadster

Lot # 110 (Sale Order: 10 of 106)      

2,912 cc inline six-cylinder engine, twin S.U. semi-downdraft carburetors, 124 HP at 4,750 RPM, four-speed manual gearbox with Laycock overdrive, independent wishbone-and-coil-spring front suspension, ¾-floating rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, Girling front disc and rear drum hydraulic brakes; wheelbase: 2,337 mm (92")
As the first update of Donald Healey’s tremendously successful Austin-Healey 100, the 100-Six, alternatively known as the 100-6, arrived in September 1956. Answering the quest for more power, performance, and all-around drivability, especially in Healey’s all-important North American markets, the 100-6 most notably heralded a twin-carbureted version of the Austin Westminster’s 2,639-cc ‘C-Series’ inline six-cylinder engine. Expertly tuned by Geoff Healey, Eddie Maher, and Harry Weslake, other updates applied to the 100-6 included a slight streamlining of the body, a wider and lower oval-shaped radiator grille, the addition of a fashionable and functional hood scoop, and a revised cockpit. A slight two-inch wheelbase extension provided room for a pair of occasional rear seats in the BN4 2+2, which shared its 92-inch wheelbase length with the two-seat BN6 for 1958 and 1959. The definitive 3000 Mark I debuted in 1959, complete with a larger-displacement 2,912 cc engine, improved gearbox, and new disc-type front brakes. Two models were offered, comprising the BN7 two-seater and Grand Touring-oriented BT7 2+2 with occasional seating for two additional passengers. The “Big Healey” continued in progressively improved BJ8 Mark II and Mark III form through the eventual end of production in early 1968. Highly prized as an immensely capable open-air British sports car – even by today’s standards – the “Big Healey” continues to be just as enjoyable and effective today as when new on racing circuits, rally stages, and winding back roads alike. This 1960 Austin-Healey 3000 Mark II BT7 2+2 is a wonderful example of this highly versatile breed, presented in highly original and unadulterated form. It is quite similar to the Healey purchased new in 1960, while he was a young businessman working in Europe. Well-maintained and stored, featuring a nice overall patina, it shows approximately 63,500 indicated miles and is desirably equipped with Laycock electric overdrive for touring ease. Worthy of simple maintenance and preservation, this British sporting icon would also provide an outstanding basis for full concours-level restoration....more

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1971 Buick Gran Sport Stage One Coupe

Lot # 111 (Sale Order: 11 of 106)      

455 cid V-8 engine, 345 HP, Turbo-Hydramatic automatic transmission , independent coil spring front suspension, link-type coil spring rear suspension, power disc brakes; wheelbase: 112”
Many of the finest, highest-performance muscle cars of this era were ridden very hard, either road or track, and many acquired the scars of battle, misguided modifications, and even abandonment. 1971 brought lower compressions and low-lead gas, but all was not lost - the Buick Grand Sport 455 Stage One still pumped 345 horsepower from four-barrel carbs and dual exhaust, with functional hood scoops feeding the ram-air induction system. Heavy duty suspension and springs help keep everything rubber side down. Stage One cars use custom cylinder heads and larger valves, an aggressive camshaft, and a Rochester Quadrajet four-barrel carburetor to maintain their category-leading performance. Many feel the 345 HP rating is a major understatement, and the documented performance of a 13.3 quarter mile and 105 mph top speed leads many testers to believe it could actually be more than 400 HP. This fine muscle car has excellent Burnt Orange painted surfaces, excellent chrome and trim, and impeccable panel gaps throughout. It rides on the factory wheels with Goodyear Wingfoot radials. Inside, the interior is very nice and stock in appearance, with clean carpets and crystal-clear glass. The Gran Sport appearance details included a custom painted hood, accent striping, dual hood air scoops and special badging. Heavy-duty suspension, disc brakes, and a 3.42 rear end rounded out the package. With the massive 455 cubic-inch V-8 out front, there are few cars of the era that can come close to the speed and torque of a well-tuned example such as this. Poised for your next performance drive, or nearly any classic car event, this lovely GS Stage One combines the classic lines and rubber burning performance that every car guy admires....more

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1941 Bantam Riviera Roadster

Lot # 113 (Sale Order: 12 of 106)      

1200 cc, inline four-cylinder engine, 50 HP, four-speed manual transmission, solid front axle with traverse leaf springs, live rear axle with quarter-elliptic leaf springs; wheelbase: 75”
American Bantam rose from the bankruptcy of American Austin Car Company. The Austins were built in Butler, Pennsylvania, from 1930 to 1934, but they never developed enough sales to survive the competition of established automakers. American Bantam produced cars from 1937 to 1941, with prices from $399 to $565. When WWII threatened, they poured their resources into winning the US Army contract for the Jeep, and folded when Willys was awarded the contract. This 1941 Bantam Riviera convertible is truly a one-of-a-kind, as this chassis #66229 is the only example known to exist with all its unique features. None other than Alex Tremulis was the designer, and he went all out - combining twin side-mounted spares and a kids’ back seat into a 75” chassis. This Riviera sports an upgraded four-cylinder British engine, a four-speed transmission and a longer-geared rear end out of a Metropolitan, for a combination of sporty performance and classic looks that is hard to beat. It’s a striking presentation in red and black paint, an immaculate new interior, a very art-deco style profile, and even a rear-mounted luggage rack. You can't miss the chrome trimmed rear wheel spats, and dual side-mounted spares inset into the black fenders. Quad lamps up front, with dual spotlights and dual mirrors for the occupants give this car a true classic vibe. Add in a soft top that is complemented by a one-off landau hard top, and it’s easy to see why this car was sought-after and owned for many years by the President of the Bantam Club here in the US. Very powerful for the vintage, certainly very cute, and definitely very rare, it all adds up to a very fun car that will be welcomed into nearly any collector-vehicle event. If you have ever yearned for a classic motoring experience in a truly unique pre-war sports car, this is an immense opportunity to take home one of the best....more

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1976 Porsche 914

Lot # 114 (Sale Order: 13 of 106)      

1,971 cc mid-mounted air-cooled, horizontally opposed four-cylinder engine, Bosch fuel injection, 91 HP, five-speed manual gearbox in rear transaxle, independent front suspension with MacPherson struts and torsion bars, independent rear suspension with semi-trailing arms and coil springs; wheelbase: 96.5"
Launched in 1964, Porsche’s new six-cylinder 911 marked a revolution that company management initially feared would alienate faithful buyers accustomed to the 356. Sharing its body/chassis with the 911, the 912 companion model was powered by the proven ‘four’ of the outgoing 356. The 912’s eventual successor, the 914, was rooted in sketches by Hans Gugelot and developed under Ferdinand A. ‘Butzi’ Porsche. Featuring taut Karmann-built bodywork by Karmann, a removable Targa roof, and initially a mid-mounted, air-cooled 1.7-litre VW four-cylinder engine, the 914 was aimed squarely at competing sports models from Datsun, Fiat, MG, and Triumph. Debuted at the 1969 Frankfurt Auto Show as a 1970 model, the 914 was sold as the “VW-Porsche 914” by VW-Porsche GmbH in Europe and as the “Porsche 914” by Volkswagen of America. In addition to its fuel-injected engine and five-speed gearbox, the 914 initially featured a choice of 11 exterior colors with standard painted bumpers. Options included chrome bumpers, a vinyl covering for the built-in Targa-style roll bar, dual horns, fog lamps, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, and pile carpeting. Only the driver’s seat included fore-aft adjustment, while the passenger side included an adjustable foot rest. Boasting near-50/50 weight distribution, outstanding handling, and quickness belying its small-displacement engine, the 914 was a revelation to drive that sold briskly and enjoyed production though 1975. Accolades included selection as Motor Trend magazine’s Import Car of the Year honors in June 1970, with the 914 hailed as “...the first modern sports car for the masses.” The 914’s influence was, and remains, profound with its basic essence echoed since 1997 by Porsche’s own Boxster. In typical Porsche fashion, the 914 was methodically improved throughout production. By 1974, power was boosted with the engine of the 914 enlarged to 2.0 litres. From the last model year, this 1976 Porsche 914 is accompanied by a spare wheel and tire and rides on a set of four Minilite-style custom wheels. As offered, it presents a number of possibilities for its new owner as a parts car, restoration candidate, or possibly as the basis for a vintage racing car....more

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1968 Chevrolet C10 Pickup

Lot # 115 (Sale Order: 14 of 106)      

Small-block Chevrolet V-8 engine, Holley four-barrel carburetor, three-speed automatic transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with coil springs, hydraulic brakes; wheelbase: 115”
The first “C/K” pickups of 1960-66 from Chevrolet and their GMC-branded counterparts marked a new era at General Motors and ushered in the light-pickup segment’s first independent front suspension. Building on their success, which included record sales levels, the new “Glamour Series” of 1967-72 continued to lead the American light-truck market with excellent engineering, greater passenger comfort and cleanly styled, highly attractive body designs. Boasting a car-like ride with coil springs front and rear on the ½- and ¾-ton two-wheel drive models, these trucks featured a wide range of powertrain options including available four-wheel drive. Ride and overall height were even lower than before, while maintaining a useful ground clearance. Of course, these exceptionally stylish pickups have been coveted and enjoyed from new and, in particular, they provide an exceptional canvas for customizing – a trend that continues uninterrupted today. Featuring an unmodified “short box” body with the exception of added rear-wheel tubs, this 1968 Chevrolet C10 custom pickup truck is a striking example of a customized Chevy C10 pickup. Built to perform, it is powered by a high-performance Chevrolet small-block V-8 engine equipped with a Holley four-barrel carburetor atop a Weiand aluminum intake manifold, plus an Edelbrock open-element air cleaner. A set of tubular exhaust headers sends the spent combustion gases to a dual exhaust system. Power is sent to the road by a three-speed automatic transmission controlled by a B & M floor shifter. Supporting features include twin electric cooling fans, an aluminum fuel cell located in the cargo bed, and a dual-circuit brake master cylinder with power assist. Finished in eye-catching light green paint over black upholstery with upgraded pattern, this excellent 1969 Chevrolet C10 custom pickup also features a Grant aftermarket steering wheel and rides on Weld Racing wheels mounting a “big and little” combination of Dunlop tires up front and Mickey Thompson Sportsman tires at the rear. Offering choice high-performance features with an essentially unmodified Chevy C10 body, this 1968 Chevrolet C10 Custom Pickup is ready to show and enjoy with equal enjoyment....more

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1969 Land Rover Series IIA SWB

Lot # 116 (Sale Order: 15 of 106)      

2,286 cc inline four-cylinder engine, 72 HP, four-speed manual gearbox, four-wheel-drive, live front and rear axles with semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes; wheelbase: 88”
Launched at the 1948 Amsterdam Motor Show, the Land Rover was Britain’s innovative alternative to the thousands of surplus American-built military Jeeps remaining after WW II – one that offered the ability to pull farm implements as well as provide on- and off-road transportation. Built with durability in mind and the agility offered by a short 80-inch wheelbase length, the Land Rover was a rock-solid machine that almost immediately assumed legendary status for its uncanny ability to travel virtually anywhere. Typical of British manufacturers of the austere postwar era, Land Rovers were soon exported to America, first shown here at the April 1950 British Automobile and Motorcycle Show. Land Rovers were carefully developed and progressed through several variations, with the wheelbase lengthened to 86 inches in Autumn 1953 and then in 1956, a longer 107-inch wheelbase model was developed. The first Land Rovers were retrospectively known as ‘Series I’ when the ‘Series II’ Land Rover was released for 1958, which amounted to a substantial improvement over its predecessors in most every respect. Essentially, Series II was a larger vehicle with a more powerful engine, additional storage room and somewhat improved creature comforts. It was no surprise then, that by November 1959, the 250,000th Land Rover left the assembly line. It was also during this timeframe that Land Rover’s enviable reputation for being the ultimate in off-road machines was firmly established, a point driven home by widespread military use by the Royal Army and many other countries. Series II continued through 1961, when the updated Series IIA models arrived for 1961. While virtually impossible to distinguish from its predecessor, the Series IIA models continue to be coveted as the most rugged and recognized expressions of the original Land Rover concept. Riding the “short” 88-inch wheelbase chassis, this “garage find” 1969 Land Rover Series IIA is a highly original and complete-appearing example with 43,637 indicated miles at the time of cataloguing. According to marque authorities, it is one of only 1,222 Land Rovers – all Series IIA models – exported to North America for 1969. Desirable additional features include a tow bar, Warn winch and removable hardtop. As offered, it is a well-preserved and highly original example of what many enthusiasts consider the finest and most collectible Land Rover model produced. Preserve and mechanically recommission it or restore it – the choice is entirely yours....more

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1978 Lincoln Continental Mk V Cartier Designer Edition

Lot # 117 (Sale Order: 16 of 106)      

460 cid V-8 engine, single Motorcraft four-barrel carburetor, 208 HP, Ford C6 three-speed automatic transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, lower trailing links and anti-sway bar, live rear axle with lower trailing radius arms, upper oblique torque arms, coil springs and transverse link, hydraulic front disc and rear drum brakes; wheelbase: 120.4”
As the evolutionary successor to the strong-selling Lincoln Continental Mk IV of 1972-76, the carefully refined Mk V debuted for 1977 and continued in production through 1979. Importantly for faithful Lincoln buyers and enthusiasts who endured the painful fuel-supply crisis of 1973-74 and the downsizing trend of the latter 1970s, the Mark V would stand alongside the massive Continental among the largest Lincoln models ever produced. With its only true remaining competition being the equally grand Cadillac Eldorado, the Mk V continued to be offered with the optional high-style Designer Series, first offered in 1976 on the Mk IV. Featuring special paint finishes, interior upholstery and special amenities, the Designer Series drew on the aesthetic inspirations of Bill Blass, Cartier, Givenchy and Emilio Pucci, initiating further special-edition cars, including the 1978 Diamond Jubilee Edition celebrating Ford Motor Company’s 75th Anniversary and the Collector’s Series Lincoln models of 1979. The Cartier Designer Edition was by far the most popular of the four available choices, with 8,520 produced out of total Mk V production of 72,602 cars for 1978. Accompanied at auction by a copy of the original build sheet, this 1978 Lincoln Continental Mk IV Cartier Designer Edition was manufactured at Ford’s Detroit-area Wixom Assembly Plant during May 1978, finished in Code 52 Light Champagne over Champagne velour upholstery with dark red accent straps and a Light Champagne vinyl roof. Power is delivered by the optional 460-cid V-8 engine and C6 three-speed automatic transmission. Following a brief stint as a demonstrator with Manhattan Ford, Lincoln-Mercury Inc. located on West 78th Street in New York City, the Mk V was sold there on June 14, 1978 to Marie A. Dimicelli of Yonkers, New York, with an Odometer Mileage Statement still on hand with the vehicle. As offered, this Mk V remains very nice in presentation, having obviously been a prized possession of its owners, with only 53,120 indicated miles of use at the time of cataloguing. As expected, factory features and amenities are numerous, including air-conditioning, AM/FM stereo radio, a Cartier-scripted clock, cruise control, power brakes, power door locks and power windows, a power reclining seat and more. Other desirable features include a tidy engine bay and a fully carpeted trunk with space-saver spare tire. Riding on a set of turbine-style forged alloy wheels (part of the Designer Series) and handsome throughout, this 1978 Lincoln Continental Mk V Cartier Edition is a collector-grade example of one of Lincoln’s premier full-size models of the late 1970s....more

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1972 Chevrolet C50 Truck

Lot # 118 (Sale Order: 17 of 106)      

350 cid V-8 engine, four-speed manual transmission with two-speed rear end, tandem axle dually rear suspension with leaf springs, front independent coil spring suspension, power drum brakes
It’s either the biggest pickup you’ve ever seen, or one of the most compact C50s around but, either way, this totally customized C50 is highly unique and is also amazingly easy to drive. Worried about a payload in your pickup? Fear not, this unit will handle the heaviest loads! With a solid build quality and a massive payload capacity, you’ll never get stuck or wimp out on a job again. The fabricator removed five feet of frame in front of, and five feet behind, the rear wheels. A stock width 8' Chevy truck bed was installed and sits atop the shortened original C50 frame rails. Power is provided by a strong, reliable 350 V-8, mated to a four-speed manual transmission with a two-speed rear end behind it for a total of eight forward gears, including an amazing low-end set for pulling or hauling. The dually rear end and front axle both wear excellent tires that give amazing grip. This custom runs and drives well and is totally sorted with no vibrations. The engine compartment is completely restored with the carb rebuilt, working manual choke, all new belts and hoses, and a new master cylinder. The rear end, wheel bearings and brakes also just received comprehensive service. The body and frame are rust-free, and everything on the truck looks absolutely fantastic and works, stops, and functions like new. The body has a nice thorough dark green paint job, with only minor issues apparent. They include some minor bodywork shrinkage and a few tiny bubbles on the bedsides. The interior is clean and original, with green vinyl seating surfaces and clean floors. The wood bed floor is brand new and completely redone just like the rest of this amazing truck. This truck is a blast to drive and turns heads everywhere. If you’ve always wanted a sports car, buy something else. But if you long to “one-up” your pickup buddies, here’s your chance - with a proven, reliable custom that they will find impossible to beat....more

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1972 Chevrolet El Camino SS

Lot # 119 (Sale Order: 18 of 106)      

402 cid V-8 engine, 240 HP, three-speed automatic transmission, front and rear coil spring suspension, power front disc and rear drum brakes; wheelbase: 116”
Round two of El Camino production began in 1964, based on the Chevelle platform, and when the Chevelle grew up and got bigger and stronger, so did the El Camino. Many consider the 1972 model to be the peak of that rise, with the big 402 cubic-inch V-8 - still known as the 396 to many fans - still pushing out 240 horsepower, and the soon-to-come hydraulic front bumpers not yet rearing their ugly heads. These classic 3rd-generation El Caminos have quietly risen to the top once again, for classic good looks and performance - all in a package that will still haul a load as well. Finished in the factory Cranberry Red with black SS stripes, this Chevy retains a deep shine and has excellent chrome, trim and SS emblems. The body panels are very straight, the deep-dish chrome wheels are like new, and every impression is that of a lovely, correct, and properly maintained SS. It’s a classic Chevy look that really ties this El Camino tightly to the Chevelle SS sedan, with both proudly displaying the performance hood scoop and those cool SS hubcaps and trim rings. The roomy interior shows only very light wear, with excellent black vinyl seats and door panels. Clean, clear glass and that classic padded dash contains factory air-conditioning and an aftermarket Kenwood AM/FM cassette. The console-shifted automatic, cruise control, power steering and power brakes make this muscle car/pickup truck a very exciting ride that is a pleasure to drive. Car guys will love popping this hood, with the big 396 looking bold and clean, just as it did in 1972. By 1973, even the El Camino had been stripped of its horsepower and saddled with huge bumpers, making these 1972 SS models highly desirable. Some call it the Billy Ray Cyrus of classic autos - “Business up front, party out back” - but we call it one of the best-looking and highest performance El Caminos you’ll ever find....more

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1938 Cadillac Series 60 Special Sedan

Lot # 120 (Sale Order: 19 of 106)      

346 cid L-head V-8 engine, 135 HP, three-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, hydraulic four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase: 127”
With a young Bill Mitchell now heading the Cadillac styling studios under the direction of Harley Earl, the new 1938 Cadillac models solidified General Motors’ position at the forefront of automotive design. In fact, by 1938, Cadillac was the undisputed king of luxury cars in America, surviving while its longstanding competitors including Pierce-Arrow, Duesenberg, Marmon, Stutz and Franklin. Cadillac’s model lines were streamlined for 1938 along five models. The V-12 Series 85 was dropped, leaving the V-8 Series 38-60, the new 38-60S Sixty Special, 38-65, and 38-75 and 38-90 V-16 lines. Series 70 and the Fisher-bodied Series 75 Specials were also dropped, but a Convertible Sedan was added to Series 65. Mechanical updates for 1938 made the great Cadillac models even better than before, with a level of sophistication, ease of operation, and drivability that was second to none. Larger and more expensive than Cadillac's entry-level Series 60, yet cheaper than the less-flamboyant large Cadillacs, the Bill Mitchell-designed Series 60 Special was a forward-looking design on several levels. Built on a double-drop frame, it stood three inches lower than other Cadillacs for 1938, with its low profile yielding improved handling and elimination of antiquated running boards – a landmark for any car from the “Big Three.” The 60 Special was also the first sedan with a fully integrated trunk compartment. Of further note, the distinctive roof of the Series 60 Special looked more like a smart convertible top rather than a customary 1930s sedan roof and the model’s generous side windows were delineated with thin, elegant chrome frames instead of the normal thick painted stampings, lending an overall look quite similar to postwar hardtops. Buyers were enthused, with 3,587 sold for the inaugural 1938 model year, plus 108 CKD (completely knocked-down) examples for export and 8 bare Series 60 chassis. An original Paint Code 11 – Fairhaven Blue car, this 1938 Cadillac Series 60 Special is an automotive design landmark that rightly enjoys CCCA Full Classic® recognition and event eligibility. Repainted with very nice finish quality and featuring a well-preserved and presentable interior, this Cadillac is powered by a 346-cid flathead engine delivering 135 factory-rated horsepower via a three-speed manual transmission. Features and passenger amenities include a heater and defroster, dual side view mirrors and rear armrests at each side and a central folding armrest. As offered, this 1938 Cadillac Series 60 Special Sedan is a highly collectible example of its maker’s fast-growing dominance of America’s fine-car market during the immediate prewar years....more

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1966 Jaguar XKE 4.2-Litre 'Series I' FHC

Lot # 121 (Sale Order: 20 of 106)      

4,235 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine, 265 HP, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with torsion bars, double wishbones and anti-roll bar, independent rear suspension with coil springs, four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes (inboard rear); wheelbase: 96"
The immediate impact and lasting influence of Jaguar’s brilliant E-Type (‘XKE’ in North America) simply cannot be overstated. Universally admired from its March 1961 Geneva launch by legions of enthusiasts and reputedly capable of inspiring even Enzo Ferrari to comment on its beauty, the new Jaguar was very much a racing car for the road, sharing DNA with the Le Mans-conquering C- and D-Types of the 1950s. Developed from the E1A development “mule” (‘XKE-101’) and the E2A sports-racer campaigned by Team Cunningham at Le Mans in 1960, the new Jaguar delivered breathtaking performance and remains the first series-production sports car to hit a factory-claimed 150 mph. While built along three distinct iterations throughout its run spanning 1961-1974, the ‘Series I’ cars are particularly coveted today for their unadulterated performance, aircraft-styled cockpit, and pure bodylines with minimalistic bumpers and sleek Perspex-covered headlamps. Main updates during ‘Series I’ production delivered greater interior comfort and from 1964, a larger-displacement, 4.2-litre engine and fully synchronized gearbox. Numbered 1E32482, this 1966 Jaguar XKE is a desirable left-hand drive, 4.2-Litre ‘Series I’ Fixed-Head Coupe with an older restoration that was performed under the prior owner. While attractively finished in Old English White with burgundy upholstery, complemented by chrome wire “knock-off” wheels, this XKE would benefit from some sorting to improve various aspects of the vehicle, including replacement of the windshield, attention to door closure, the hood-opening mechanisms, and the driver’s side interior door panel and fitment. In addition to a car cover, this XKE is accompanied by a cargo compartment filled with miscellaneous spare parts, plus numerous parts, restoration, and Jaguar reference books, plus a fire extinguisher and show trophy. As offered, this XKE will provide the opportunity for astute collectors to acquire a truly legendary sports car and with some selective attention and effort, elevate the car for the show field or as a highly enjoyable classic sports tourer....more

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1956 Chrysler 300B Coupe

Lot # 122 (Sale Order: 21 of 106)      

354 cid “Hemi” V-8 engine, twin four-barrel Carter carburetors, 355 HP at 5,200 RPM, 2-Speed PowerFlite automatic transmission with pushbutton control, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs; four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes; wheelbase: 126”
Following the successful launch of the C-300 of 1955, Chrysler released the even more powerful 300B for 1956, continuing the growing “Letter Car” legend, which would continue through 1965. As one of the finest expressions of Chrysler designer Virgil Exner’s “Forward Look” design theme, the 300B continued for 1956 with sleek Newport hardtop bodywork fitted with “egg-crate” grille elements borrowed from the Imperial, plus a slightly revised taillamp treatment. Inside, the 300B was purposeful, albeit with rich leather upholstery and pushbutton dash controls for the two-speed PowerFlite automatic transmission. Lurking underhood was Chrysler’s “FirePower” V-8 engine with hemispherical combustion chambers, now displacing 354 cubic-inches for 1956 and delivering 340 horsepower in single four-barrel tune or 355 HP with the very rare optional “Dual Quad” setup. While known as a “banker’s hot rod,” the 300B and its C-300 forebear were purpose-built by Chrysler to dominate AAA and NASCAR stock-car racing. Spearheaded by successful businessman Karl Kiekhaefer of Mercury Marine, Chrysler 300s were race-prepared at the Mercury Research Lab, where his racing headquarters were located. Selecting former Hudson star driver Tim Flock, Kiekhaefer’s first race came in 1955 at Daytona, resulting in victory. The Kiekhaefer team entered 40 of 45 races for 1955, winning 22 – 18 with Flock, who won his second national title. For 1956, Kiekhaefer’s team campaigned the 300B and quickly expanded with more cars top-name drivers. In 1956, the Mercury Marine team took 21 of the first 25 races, including 16 consecutive victories from March 25 to May 30, going on to 30 wins out of 50 races entered. The 300B was critical to this success and helped make legends of its drivers. Restored and continuing to be handsome in presentation, this 1956 Chrysler 300B is one of those rare examples powered by the optional “Dual-Quad” Hemi V-8 engine developing 355 factory-rated horsepower. It carries fascinating history as well, having once been fitted with a secret compartment underneath the front seat to hold a .38 police revolver, which was discovered only after the car was purchased at auction by George Finley. Desirable features include power steering and a Town and Country AM radio, plus Kelsey-Hayes wire-spoke wheels. In addition to a spare tire mounted on a wire wheel and roadside jack, this 300B also includes an original 1956 Chrysler Service Manual. No collection of the finest postwar high-performance cars can be complete without an early Chrysler 300 “Letter Car,” and as one of just 1,102 produced, this example demands serious consideration....more

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1953 Mercury Monterey Two-Door Sedan

Lot # 123 (Sale Order: 22 of 106)      

255 cid V-8 engine, 125 HP, three-speed manual column shift transmission, front independent coil spring suspension, rear longitudinal leaf springs, four-wheel power drum brakes; wheelbase: 118”
Mercury got a styling and engineering redesign for 1952, as the division stepped up their game in order to move out of Ford’s shadow. Improvements included 18 percent more window area, and the heater and vent controls were changed to levers and placed on a plane set perpendicular to the dash behind the steering wheel, inspired by flight controls in large aircraft. Monterey became a separate series for the first time and was Mercury's top model line in 1953. A convertible and four-door sedan were included in the new series lineup, and Mercury sales began to climb. This very original restored Monterey has gone through a comprehensive body-on restoration that shows great attention to the originality of the early Mercs. This two-door hard top is powered by a rebuilt Flathead V-8 with a two-barrel Holley carburetor and three-speed column shift transmission. The Monterey jumps to attention quickly and runs silently like a good Mercury should, and the car is equipped with factory power brakes. These are spacious, easy cruising cars that handle with ease and provide a very comfortable ride. This example has a very solid body and is very straight throughout, with great panel gaps and lines that show easily on the Yosemite Yellow paint finish. The trim and chrome are likewise very sharp, with all the brightwork either highly polished or re-plated. The rubber meets the road with wide whitewalls and full chrome hubcaps, and it’s simply a beautiful presentation of a classic and popular Mercury body style. The interior is done in the black and white cloth and vinyl style, and the entire cabin looks like new. A clean dashboard with clear gauges is cleverly laid out, and there’s plenty room for five in the spacious cabin. Everything operates properly, and this Monterey is a pleasure to drive. A Texas car, this 1953 Monterey remains in fine, stock condition throughout, and serves as a reminder of how great these Mercurys really are....more

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1974 Citroën 2CV Camionette

Lot # 124 (Sale Order: 23 of 106)      

Air-cooled, flat two-cylinder engine, four-speed manual gearbox, front and rear trailing-arm suspension, four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase 94.5”
Unveiled at the October 1948 Paris Salon, the minimalistic Citroën 2CV went on to be every bit as criticized, yet beloved, as Volkswagen’s Beetle. Capable of reaching perhaps 40 mph flat out and consequently the butt of countless jokes, the 2CV was crucial to mobilizing postwar French reconstruction, nonetheless. Despite the critics, including France’s president, Citroën took a veritable flood of customer orders at the car’s Paris debut. In fact, the 2CV was an immediate and massive commercial success, with a three-year waiting list within months of it going on sale and soon extending to five years. Interestingly, used examples frequently commanded higher sale prices than new cars because buyers were not required to wait. Given the importance of the 2CV to the French economy, priority for new cars was given to those required to travel by car because of the nature of work, and for those whom ordinary cars were too expensive to purchase. Among the favored 2CV buyers were veterinarians, doctors, midwives, priests and small-scale farmers. As production numbers increased, the 2CV was carefully and methodically developed and improved, helping to explain the unusually long 2CV production run, which continued through 1988 in France and from 1988-90 in Portugal. By 1951, the 2CV received such welcome upgrades as an ignition lock and lockable driver's door, with production now reaching 100 cars per week and 16,288 for the year. Following the basic 2CV, the 2CV Camionette panel van, also known as the Fourgonnette, arrived. Predictably, the Camionette was a frequent sight everywhere in France, given its trim proportions, startling economy, and generous cargo compartment. This 1974 Citroën 2CV Camionette is a clean, well-presented example of these hard-working yet utterly charming French vehicles. Basic and purposeful as expected, it retains a French number plate and features a cargo compartment with side windows and a tool/storage compartment. The Dove Grey paint finish is nicely contrasted by the green-finished steel wheels, the engine compartment and interior appear driver-quality and highly original, with the vehicle quite presentable throughout. Looking as though it was just taken out of commercial service, this 1974 Citroën 2CV Camionette is a wonderful and rare find at auction....more

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1958 Citroën 2CV

Lot # 125 (Sale Order: 24 of 106)      

297 cc air-cooled, flat-twin engine, 9 HP, four-speed manual gearbox, front and rear trailing-arm suspension, four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase 94.5”
When Citroën introduced the 2CV, short for Deux Chevaux (“Two Horses”) in 1948, it is certain that no one thought it would still be in production through 1988 in France and from 1988 to 1990 in Portugal. Rooted in a 1936 brief penned by Citroën vice-president and head of engineering and design Pierre-Jules Boulanger to his design team, the TPV (Toute Petite Voiture – "Very Small Car") was to be developed in secrecy at the facilities of Michelin, Citroën’s corporate parent, by the same staff responsible for Citroën’s revolutionary Traction Avant. The outbreak of war in Europe frustrated the project, as did anticipated postwar aluminum shortages; however, with only an estimated 100,000 of two million cars remaining in operation after the war, the urgency of postwar reconstruction spurred production of Citroën’s new small car. While sometimes disparaged as the “Tin Snail,” the 2CV was elegantly simple, offering a durable, low-cost way to get farmers away from their horses and economically mobilize the general public. With its minimalistic body, seating for up to four adults, easily serviced air-cooled engine, the 2CV also offered excellent gas mileage. Importantly, its long-travel suspension offered a soft ride while being rugged enough for limited off-road use. These elements and the renowned near-indestructability of the 2CV kept it in demand and production far longer than the most optimistic early forecasts. Today, it continues to rank on many “Greatest Cars” lists and remains a favorite in the collector-car market. Offered here is a fascinating “garage find” 2 CV that appears to be complete and nicely preserved. It also features a rare vinyl roof that retracts all the way to the rear bumper. While this feature may be seen as a nod to open-air touring, it was in fact more for utilitarian purposes, allowing larger items to be carried in back. The minimalistic interior reflects the purposeful nature of the car, with simple with upholstered cushions over steel seat frames. The dashboard is also a simple affair with a speedometer set directly ahead of the steering wheel. At the rear is found a spare wheel and tire plus lug wrench. The Citroën 2CV is a car that represents a significant milestone in the development of the automobile and this example could be preserved and enjoyed or restored....more

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1939 Packard Super Eight Convertible Coupe

Lot # 126 (Sale Order: 25 of 106)      

320 cid inline eight-cylinder engine, 130 HP, three-speed manual transmission, independent A-arm coil spring front suspension, rear leaf springs, hydraulic drum brakes; wheelbase: 127”
Packard introduced their 16th series of automobiles on September 30th, 1937. By 1939, Packard was still the leader of the small independent manufacturers, due in part to its popular Packard Six and the Super Eight being still offered in six different body styles. By 1939, the 17th Series Senior Packards consisted of the Twelve and the Super Eight, both of which saw styling improvements including a V-shaped windshield, increasingly rounded fenders and an all-around smoother profile. A new instrument panel allowed for full instrumentation with built-in defrosters on the interior. This Packard Super Eight rides on a factory chassis with a 127” wheelbase that was new for 1939, which redistributed the weight of the car. This, coupled with new steering geometry and the larger 320 cubic-inch engine, made the 16th series Super Eight one of the most maneuverable Senior Packard’s ever constructed. Most Senior models for 1938 were still built to order, but their high price tags made them unavailable for 1939. One of the most striking and practical factory offerings was the Super Eight Convertible Coupe which offered room for four passengers and the option of open-air motoring. This beautiful Convertible Coupe represents the pinnacle year of the Super Eight designation, and the last year of production for the Convertible Coupe. The occupants will enjoy a large roomy cabin, leather upholstery, and a quiet and comfortable ride. The woodgrain veneers are spectacular, with clean round gauges and a classic banjo-style steering wheel. The eight-cylinder engine starts with ease and runs virtually silently, a testament to Packard’s engineering. The car is well-detailed under the hood, and the fit and finish of this body is excellent, with lovely cream paint and straight chrome bits throughout. The side-mounted spares with metal covers are literally swallowed up by the sweeping front fenders. For 1939, Packard produced 3,962 Super Eights and, as always, they were built to the highest standards, and remain one of the finest American cars of the pre-war era....more

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